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bluewolf
11-10-2003, 08:35 AM
This was tagged onto the lengthy Sigel thread, so I figured it better to move it here.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote AzHousePro:</font><hr> Cycopath, we do occasionally have speed issues like most sites out there. I am not sure about the "completely down or nearly every link dead" part.

Mike <hr /></blockquote>

Mike, it does come up for me, sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. Would the type of connection a person is using have any impact on this?

I use cable.

Laura

Buzzsaw
11-10-2003, 10:18 AM
There are a few things that determine speed when accessing a web site. Probably the main culprit is the connection type. If you're using a 56K modem compared to a T1 or DSL connection then you're going to get a very slow transfer rate. Then when a site has some really cool images/graphics that have not been compressed your speed will start to be really effected. Bottom line is you get what you pay for. If you want speed on the internet you're going to have to spend the money.

cycopath
11-10-2003, 01:02 PM
I never go to their board, but the website is hit or miss with me. And I'm on DSL.

bluewolf
11-10-2003, 01:10 PM
I wonder if it is that those buttons are graphic intensive and take longer to load????

Laura

Nostroke
11-10-2003, 01:17 PM
There is something amiss I think as even with my cable connection, there has been a big change recently for the worse which started around the time of the Open. Like someone else said it's hit or miss. It's such a good site though -it will have to get real bad before i give up on it.

MarkUrsel
11-10-2003, 01:19 PM
A few other things probably affect AZ's site:

1) a server or server connection that's not quite up to the task of a busy site,
2) a Cold Fusion based site (it's greate for small sites, deathly inefficient for busy sites),
3) a slow or small-scale database providing content to the site,
4) pages that are too 'heavy'.

I've worked with Cold Fusion and Cold Fusion Enterprise Server and have hit the same problems on some of the commercial websites I've done (which is why I no longer use it). That'd be my guess. If they are using a small scale database such as MS Access to feed the site, that'd add to the problem a lot. Throw in a slow server and you have three serious bottlenecks.

AVB also hosts a lot of images and use very 'heavy' pages (lots of graphics, all of them too big). For example, the page and graphics for today's home page add up to over 185KB in total. That's twice as large as what I use as a maximum! That kind of load going out over a limited server connection, and you can chew up all your bandwidth in a hurry.

-- Mark &lt;-- why yes, that is what I do for a living!

RedHell
11-10-2003, 01:19 PM
The way buzzsaw described the problem is a simplistic way at looking at the problem. Slow performance is not only resulting from the clients bandwith. Many other factor could be involved. Buying more bandwith won't fix the problem.

Often when you try to load a web page and you're not getting all the graphics and buttons, you are facing a server problem. A web page is composed of many items which all require one connection. So to load a full page your computer will establish many connections. If one of those fail, the item won't load, just like described in the previous posts.

Often these imcompleted connections were dropped by the server because he was to busy and overloaded. In that case the client isn't at fault. Doing a refresh will usually fix the problem as most browser will cache the items that were already downloaded and will download the incompleted ones.

RedHell
11-10-2003, 01:24 PM
Mark,

I agree, server load and database load are often under-estimated in network design...

A 185kb picture isn't that big, but you are right in the sense that the longer the download, the less connection a minute can be serve...

Buzzsaw
11-10-2003, 04:10 PM
You're right all things being equal the problems generally are from the server side. However, most of the people I know that have an internet connection at home are usually running a small modem. As I'm sure you are aware no matter how streamlined the server is you're not going to get performance with a modem. Especially on a site that's heavy with graphics.

eg8r
11-11-2003, 07:24 AM
[ QUOTE ]
2) a Cold Fusion based site (it's greate for small sites, deathly inefficient for busy sites), <hr /></blockquote> I somewhat disagree. Maybe if the CF is not written well. Based on our systems here at work, the CF projects are significantly faster than asp and asp.net projects (our CF projects are written in the MX architecture which is significantly faster than the previous 5.0 and below).

[ QUOTE ]
3) a slow or small-scale database providing content to the site,
4) pages that are too 'heavy'.
<hr /></blockquote> This is probably more the reason than CF.

[ QUOTE ]
I've worked with Cold Fusion and Cold Fusion Enterprise Server and have hit the same problems on some of the commercial websites I've done (which is why I no longer use it). That'd be my guess. <hr /></blockquote> It's a draw. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif We have quite large sites (SupplierNet) running and far fewer problems than the asp and .net sites.

[ QUOTE ]
If they are using a small scale database such as MS Access to feed the site, that'd add to the problem a lot. Throw in a slow server and you have three serious bottlenecks.
<hr /></blockquote> Surely they are not running MSAccess. Tell me it is not true. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif Agreed, this would be the death of the site. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

[ QUOTE ]
Mark &lt;-- why yes, that is what I do for a living <hr /></blockquote> LOL, me too and I love it. I am not cut out for the manual labor thing. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif Just finished tiling part of my house (about 1100 sq ft) and the whole time I was thankful I had a desk job. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

eg8r &lt;~~~My allegiance to CF is more for development time savings than anything. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif