PDA

View Full Version : Distracted-- play through, or re-set?



phil in sofla
11-14-2003, 07:27 PM
When I'm down on a shot, and I catch some movement in the surroundings, I try to refocus without starting over my whole pre-shot routine, just restarting my practice stroking until I feel ready for my final stroke. I'm noticing this isn't always working, and wonder if I should instead stand up, and re-set?

Which way do you do it? Stay down, and work through it, try to regain the focus, or re-set from the beginning?

ras314
11-14-2003, 07:39 PM
I usually just go ahead and miss. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Sometimes I just get down on the ball wrong, usually because of some distraction. Then I have to stand up and start over to have any chance.

Actually once down and everything feels good not much short of getting bumped is liable to bother me. More or less used to rowdy bars.

Rick the stick
11-14-2003, 08:33 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> When I'm down on a shot, and I catch some movement in the surroundings, I try to refocus without starting over my whole pre-shot routine, just restarting my practice stroking until I feel ready for my final stroke. I'm noticing this isn't always working, and wonder if I should instead stand up, and re-set?

Which way do you do it? Stay down, and work through it, try to regain the focus, or re-set from the beginning? <hr /></blockquote>


Turn on prime time TV on Sunday, something pool is never on, watch real pros in action on Golf, they back off, reset, go back thru routine. Learn from Golf, it wil help your pool. Dont mess with Rick, mess with my wa, it aint pretty. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SPetty
11-14-2003, 08:54 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ras314:</font><hr> Actually once down and everything feels good not much short of getting bumped is liable to bother me. <hr /></blockquote>I'm beginning to learn this truth. Essentially, the only time that I'll get distracted on a shot is if I'm not really sure that I'll make the shot. Like you said, if I'm "there", I won't be distracted. If I'm not "there", any little thing seems to vie for my attention.

That's the real reason to get up and start over rather than staying down and working through it, even if you don't feel you're distracted too much. Just because you were distracted, you probably weren't set up just right or focused in on the shot.

Just a thought.

Ralph S.
11-14-2003, 10:56 PM
Always reset. If you do the routine half-assed the results you get are half-assed. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif

Karatemom
11-15-2003, 02:33 AM
Definitely get up and start back at step 1 again. If you're mind is on anything else, from someone walking in front of the table to "maybe I'll miss this shot but I'll try anyway", you will most definitely screw something up, LOL.

Heide ~ needs to take her own advice sometimes

pooldaddy9
11-15-2003, 05:19 AM
Start over, your mind isn't on the shot.

cheesemouse
11-15-2003, 05:33 AM
get up and repeat as nessessary....... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Sid_Vicious
11-15-2003, 08:34 AM
Well the answer is to stand back up in most cases, but where does one decide that there is an obvious distraction and were one simply understands that the PH is animated by nature and toughen up and shoot through? You could get to look like a yo-yo if every little thing gets into your head. I play pool with a guy who's game goes to crap when the music pipes up. I think that's a bit self destructive. I personally have little problems with sounds, my weakness is the occasional female bombshell walking by, gets me no matter what. On the other hand I can be bumped after getting into prestroke and I shoot through, doesn't seem to bother me that much. It's a matter of recognizing just what is a distraction and what you want to blame as one. Misses in this game are most always a distraction of some kind, some self made up, but real in our own minds, and that's where the answer lies. If you truly feel distracted, then stand up and start over. Otherwise try to realize that you are in a busy room and phase it all out and play the shot...sid

dg-in-centralpa
11-15-2003, 09:29 AM
I generally will reset. If I don't, I will usually miss. One guy who used to shoot in my league would come in a little late. He would wait to ring the buzzer at the club until someone was ready to pull the trigger, hoping they would miss. We always had someone watch for him.

DG - justm2c

Chris Cass
11-15-2003, 10:21 AM
Tap, Tap, Tap.

/ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif,

C.C.~~so many pool players would do anything to win. focus is what they're attacking.

cycopath
11-15-2003, 11:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> I personally have little problems with sounds, my weakness is the occasional female bombshell walking by, gets me no matter what.<hr /></blockquote>

Wanna play some $100 a game 9ball?

You don't mind if I bring a couple of strippers with me for cheerleading purposes, do you?

SRpool
11-15-2003, 11:45 AM
Always stand up...even though it's hard to get yourself to do. I have a bad habit of trying to talk myself out of the fact that I was distracted and try to make the shot regardless...which leads to missing...which leads to losing. So stand up and have a laugh at the stupid person who tried to shark you. Then get down and shoot.

Sid_Vicious
11-15-2003, 12:19 PM
"You don't mind if I bring a couple of strippers with me for cheerleading purposes, do you?"

Yea, if you'll let me take them home! They'd probably cost me about what it'd take to buy them up front anyways ;-)

Rod
11-15-2003, 02:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> If I'm not "there", any little thing seems to vie for my attention.

SPetty, I like this line of thinking. You HAVE to be there, matter of fact I can't think of anything more important at that moment. People seem to find many things that they must think is more important. Well that is until they miss the shot! LOL I hear people talk about sharking (someone took a drink, moved a foot, moved an arm, talked to someone, someone walked by, (sometimes 20 or more feet away), etc etc etc. Well if you have that problem, your not focused on a specific point of a 2 1/4" area, Your focused on the whole room!!! Think you might miss? It really is obvious that one needs to get it all together if you want to improve.

Just because you were distracted, you probably weren't set up just right or focused in on the shot.

(Or have the shot visualized completely. You may have aim along with any english if used but you haven't finalized the speed of stroke. Sometimes (more than people think) changes in speed (from the original thought) will cause a miss. At the least it will cause poor position. All of the necessities for that shot have to be "ON". Some shots at any players level get very intricate. If one ingredient is off kilter to far, the whole shot blows up "BAM". My Emerald routine. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif )

<hr /></blockquote>

Rod
11-15-2003, 02:49 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SRpool:</font><hr> So stand up and have a laugh at the stupid person who tried to shark you. Then get down and shoot. <hr /></blockquote>

So now your calling me a shark? LOL I'm Joe average person, innocent and just walking by. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif Could it possibly be that your really not completely focused? JAT. Funny, sometimes I see people walking around in near dead punch. They make most everything, nothing bothers them. That same person after a critical miss or two or on another day can let many things bother them. Something changed, guess what? LOL

Rod

SRpool
11-15-2003, 06:06 PM
I didn't mean it that the innocent person walking by that doesn't know any better tried to shark you, I meant the person you were sharked by. And true, sometimes people in dead punch aren't sharked by anything and other times everything bothers them.

nhp
11-16-2003, 05:08 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> When I'm down on a shot, and I catch some movement in the surroundings, I try to refocus without starting over my whole pre-shot routine, just restarting my practice stroking until I feel ready for my final stroke. I'm noticing this isn't always working, and wonder if I should instead stand up, and re-set?

Which way do you do it? Stay down, and work through it, try to regain the focus, or re-set from the beginning? <hr /></blockquote>

I'll tell you something interesting- nothing ever sharked me until a few years ago when I read a book on pool by Robert Byrne that had a section on sharking. I did not know sharking existed. Of course at that time the game was only two years old to me, but I was a progressing player. The next day after reading that part of the book, I played in a local tournament, and everything sharked me. I had psyched myself out, and it took me a few months to overcome that. It takes alot for me to get sharked these days. When I am "on" my focus is completely on the table, nothing else. If somebody calls my name when I am concentrating, it takes a few tries for me to actually hear them sometimes. If movement in the background bothers you, you should really try to work on your concentration. If you ever get the chance, see Scott Lee, he taught me a few things recently that has helped my concentration even more. Good luck to you /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Sid_Vicious
11-16-2003, 08:53 AM
"I hear people talk about sharking (someone took a drink, moved a foot, moved an arm"

I'm gonna admit something folks, I've gone through a phase in past years where I have done this. Yea I grew up since then, but in the early days when I wanted to prove myself by having a winning night for the team in league, I'd find opportunities when I found myself sitting in the other guy's line of sight, him down on a must make the ball shot, and I'd simply switch hands on my cue at a sneaky time. I ain't proud of it today, but it worked the highest percentage of the time. I've since then sat stone cold still or get up and move ahead of the entire shot. I also know that things happen and are said by other people around the table which are just coincidence and not a shark, but you'd be amazed how little it takes to rattle some average players, even some above average. What can I say, I regret those days, it doesn't happen anymore. Anyone else with a guilty past???sid

phil in sofla
11-16-2003, 08:35 PM
I generally play in busy pool halls, and the truly background movements and general noises, etc., I handle fine. It is when the movement comes up close, as in right by the table, and in my line of focusing, that it is a problem.

Standing up seems the best tactic then, and that's what I will do from now on, along with other unforced error reduction, such as not stretching for shots too far down the table.