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View Full Version : 8 footers easier to play on?



UTAddb
11-15-2003, 11:34 AM
I find 8 footers much easier to play on compared to 9 footers. Is this common? On 8 footers I'm consistently running out and on 9 footers or even oversized 8's I'm always having trouble. A foot doesn't sound like a big difference, but it seems like on 8 footers you have to move the CB around so much less. I guess it's because I grew up on an 8 footer and I rarely play on 9s. Does this mean I just need to work on my long game or what? Thanks.

cycopath
11-15-2003, 11:42 AM
Probably the biggest thing would be try not to pysch yourself out by thinking how much bigger the 9ft table is, while you are playing on it.
Convince yourself that the 9ft table is better because of less clusters.

moblsv
11-15-2003, 12:30 PM
My experience with 9' table has been the same. I almost always play on 8' tables and when I play 9' I just seem to start missing easy shots. The good thing is it also seems that when I return to the 8' table it does seem easier.

it seems like
shorter table == shorter shots, more clusters
longer table == longer shots, more open table

Because the table is more open on a 9' I actually prefer playing it even if I am a bit uncomfortable on it.

Sneakster
11-17-2003, 09:55 AM
Isn't there some sort of method where some plays actually think of the table to be six feet (taking out a 1 1/2 feet each side, and going out of tht area would be off the table, but actually helps to get position). I'm not good at explaining things...but I read it in Precision Pool.

BTW, I mostly play on a six footer, but I am now finding it easiert o adpat to even Snooker tables.

RUNaRAK
11-17-2003, 10:05 AM
I agree with cycho... Most of it is mental but you are in the majority finding it easier to play on the 8 footer. I have come across many very good players on a bar box, put them on a Diamond Pro 9' and they cannot put 3 balls together. A good player with a true stroke will probably favor the bigger table. I have an 8" <font color="red"> {footer=" in my book LOL}</font color> in my home with tight pockets and I still would rather play on a 9'. It is a good test of my stroke and gives me more room to move the cue ball. Keep working on the stroke and confidence will increase= better play on the bigger tables..

Peace,

MarkUrsel
11-17-2003, 10:27 AM
Around here, all I've found so far are 6', 7' and 9' tables. I find the 9 footers harder, but not by a large margin, just because of the clustering factor. The 6 and 7 foot bar boxes are a lot easier if the break is wide and they don't cluster up too bad.

That being said, if I play on the bar box at my local pub, I will run out a lot more than if I'm on a 9 footer. Even with half a snootfull! The shotmaking is much easier.

Amsterdam has a tight-pocket 9' table that was manufactured by the devil himself. With very lively rails and 1/4" shims on both sides of the pockets it's a humbling table to play on.

cycopath
11-17-2003, 11:51 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote RUNaRAK:</font><hr>I have an 8" in my home with tight pockets and I still would rather play on a 9". <hr /></blockquote>

I would think an eight inch table would have really tight pockets.

Just kidding. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

UWPoolGod
11-17-2003, 12:04 PM
LOL I caught that too, but didn't want to say anything HAHA. Anyone ever have one of those tiny desk pool tables with the spring loaded cues? I have also seen some larger two foot coffee table pooltables on eBay...wonder how those are??????

RUNaRAK
11-17-2003, 12:08 PM
I would think an eight inch table would have really tight pockets.

Just kidding. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote>

I deserve that. Just hate that but you made me laugh at myself.. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
Not a problem, I just get my " and ' confused some times.

Peace

Rick the stick
11-17-2003, 03:41 PM
When I came up playing in Kling and Allens and Millers in KCMO I played in a world of 5x10' tables, pool and billiards was on the same size table and the rails could be changed to switch games if they wanted to. Playing pool then on the tens into those 4 l/2" pockets was one hell of a challenge compared to a bar box today with bucket slop pockets.

A foot does make a difference. With my eye sight failing me now I run racks on the home 8's with no problem but I now struggle badly on the 9's.

You can be a 9' player and go down to an 8 and 7 and play better. If you are a 7 or 8' player and you go up to a 9 you play worse. For years when I could come into my home room every day, the first thing I would do was get on the 10' snooker table with my pool balls and run 3 racks, 45 balls. I just kept shooting until I ran the 45, sure I missed a lot, but it would tighten my aim going into those ultra tight snooker pockets. When I would get where I could shoot that pool ball down the rail and pot, I knew I was on. I would then go over to the 9' table and run 200 balls in practice and the pockets would look like buckets and the 9' table felt like a bar box. Many of my high runs nobody believes today occured because of this practice and previous warm up on the snooker table before making the run on the 9's.

When I was a captain of a team in the APA I placed my team playing in a room that had 9' tables with 4 l/2" pockets. When the bar table teams came in to play us in our room coming off the 7' tables we had even their better players by the short hairs. We were unbeatable there once we got the feel of the tighter pockets and the longer size. Once we won a division and were going to Vegas, I would switch the team out of there and make it a traveling team that played on nothing but bar boxes to get ready for that competition. You can go down, you can't go up.
Don't mess wit da stick, mess with my wa, it ain't pretty.
/ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fred Agnir
11-17-2003, 04:04 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rick the stick:</font><hr> Once we won a division and were going to Vegas, I would switch the team out of there and make it a traveling team that played on nothing but bar boxes to get ready for that competition. You can go down, you can't go up.
<hr /></blockquote>If you can go down, but you can't go up, why wouldn't you have simply kept the team on 9' tables with 4.5" pockets to get ready to play on the bar tables in Vegas? Doesn't your statement "get ready for competition" simply mean that either size table, you have to get used to? And that even players who play mostly on 9' tables still have to practice on 7' tables because the transition isn't automatic?

I'm sure I'm not the only person that's seen very good players who play on 9' tables exclusively, that just don't perform to the same level "going down" to bar tables. Making balls usually isn't the problem. It's the traffic, cushion reactions, and a host of other bar table nuances.

IMO, it goes both ways. If you're more used to one, there will always be a period of adjustment when going to the other.

Fred