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stickman
12-02-2003, 09:05 AM
There are several portable cue lathes for repair work, but most of them are very expensive for the hobbyist wanting a little better tools to work with. The amount of work that I expect to generate would take a long time to recover my investment. I started a small homemade lathe just before my divorce, but lost it during the divorce, and it was very limited anyway.

I found Shaftmaster.com and was very interested. The price seems reasonable, and comes complete. (Not a lot of expensive options /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif ) I have no desire to make cues, I just want to be able to do good quality repair work, with a little more precision than most hand tools will allow.

Has any else looked to it or tried one?


Just a side note: The new poolhall is doing very well. It is only small, but is very clean, and well managed. The food is very good and is open 7 days a week. I have a part-time job. (cash /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif ) Once a week, I vacuum, and clean the tables (Windex works great) I polish the the balls with the the mini-buffer. (Liquid Turtlewax works great too) I also repair the house cues. I am starting to repair a few customers cues, but am limited to some hand tools.

The effects of my stroke gets better every day. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Jim

Cueless Joey
12-02-2003, 09:35 AM
I've seen the owner of that, Jude, a few times.
It's very handy but requires skill and patience as the parts are really small.
It'd be hard to retenon shafts with that machine.
You will also have to use a Porper tenon die to thread the tenon.
If the owner allows you some room, I'd put in a used table lathe down there. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif Like a Logan 11 by 36.

stickman
12-02-2003, 10:29 AM
I appreciate the opinion. I might continue looking for a small, used, metal lathe.

Troy
12-02-2003, 11:19 AM
Unfortunately, the Shaftmaster Lathe is not even on my radar ---
At first glance ---
First, I don't how you could work on house cues 'cuz of the limited bed length.
Second, the chuck is NOT a "feed through" but more like a drill motor chuck.
Third, there is NOT a front/back axis adjustment unless you actually move the bit in the tool holder.
Forth, the left/right axis is awkward.

I have seen or used a Cuesmith, but it appears adequate.
You take a look at http://www.cuesmith.com/main/lathes/mid_size/index.php

I have a Porper Mini Lathe Lathe and am very satisfied. When I bought mine the cost was $1500 but I think it's now up to $1800. You can take a look at http://www.porper.com/lathes.htm
I recovered my investment in less that 6 monthe.

If I had to do it over I'd still get the Porper even though it's NOT reall portable at about 150 pounds.

Hope this helps... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Cueless Joey
12-02-2003, 12:04 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote stickman:</font><hr> I appreciate the opinion. I might continue looking for a small, used, metal lathe. <hr /></blockquote>
Stick, I'd definitely try to find a good metal lathe if I were you. Assuming you have machining skills.
Find an 11 inch by 36 if you can. The spindle bore should be around 2 inches so the cue butts go in ( with a soft plastic collet). This way you can work on house cues.
The Porper lathe looks handy though.

stickman
12-02-2003, 12:38 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Troy:</font><hr> I recovered my investment in less than 6 months.

Hope this helps... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif <hr /></blockquote>

That's very interesting. I will have to keep patient until the divorce property settlement is done. I can only guess when that will be. In the mean while, I can continue exploring all the options.

Good information.

griffith_d
12-02-2003, 02:47 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote stickman:</font><hr> There are several portable cue lathes for repair work, but most of them are very expensive for the hobbyist wanting a little better tools to work with. The amount of work that I expect to generate would take a long time to recover my investment. I started a small homemade lathe just before my divorce, but lost it during the divorce, and it was very limited anyway.

I found Shaftmaster.com and was very interested. The price seems reasonable, and comes complete. (Not a lot of expensive options /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif ) I have no desire to make cues, I just want to be able to do good quality repair work, with a little more precision than most hand tools will allow.

Has any else looked to it or tried one?


Just a side note: The new poolhall is doing very well. It is only small, but is very clean, and well managed. The food is very good and is open 7 days a week. I have a part-time job. (cash /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif ) Once a week, I vacuum, and clean the tables (Windex works great) I polish the the balls with the the mini-buffer. (Liquid Turtlewax works great too) I also repair the house cues. I am starting to repair a few customers cues, but am limited to some hand tools.

The effects of my stroke gets better every day. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Jim <hr /></blockquote>

I have looked at several of the mentioned sites, but here is one that might make something worth looking at.

http://www.uniqueinc.com/

Griff

pooltchr
12-02-2003, 02:49 PM
since you're shopping, here's another one to check out. Very well made and mine has been working for me for several years with no problems.
http://www.uniqueinc.com/

buddha162
12-03-2003, 03:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote griffith_d:</font><hr>
I have looked at several of the mentioned sites, but here is one that might make something worth looking at.

http://www.uniqueinc.com/

Griff <hr /></blockquote>

Is the Travel Tipper as good as the bigger lathes if all I want to do is tip work (replacing, trimming, etc)?

Roger

pooltchr
12-03-2003, 06:51 AM
I haven't tried the travel tipper, but Brian makes a quality product. I use the Cue Companion lathe and have been very happy with it. You might want to give him a call and talk to him. He was very helpful when I was shopping and I ended up getting exactly what I needed.

Popcorn
12-03-2003, 10:18 AM
Not that many lathes that size have a spindle bore over an inch. Most are 3/4 to 7/8. There are a few Logans and the South Bend heavy 10L have 1 3/8 inch bore. To be honest, someone is better off just getting one of the new Chinese lathes like the Speedway 7 x12 or one of many out there under $400. then some of those so called cue lathes. With a little modifications you can do really precision work and they have a 3/4 spindle bore. Here is a web site that may be interesting.
http://www.mini-lathe.com/Mini_lathe/Versions/Versions.htm
Also if you get a chance to get a bigger lathe you will still find use for the small lathe, it is not wasted money. I just picked up an old Atlas 6 x 18 last weekend for $300. It is like new in the original shipping crate. The owner moved some 20 years ago and never set the lathe up again. It is not really any good for cue work because the spindle bore is only 17/32 but I will use it for part making or what ever. It is really cool because it is a duplicate of the bigger Atlas 10 x 36 lathe and very well built. Doing house cues is not that hard. I have a pipe that sticks out on the outboard side of my big lathe to support the cue, this is a 2000 pound lathe though and vibration is not a problem. On a small lathe you would have to make a pretty substantial support but it will not be hard. I only charge $4.50 to re-tip house cues and I often get them by the dozen from the local condo's. I have had guys tell me that I do them too cheap, but I can do a dozen cues in less then two hours and that is not bad money, (That is doing a nice job, not a hack job), plus there is a limit to what you can charge for a house cue.

Rip
12-04-2003, 08:33 AM
Very true Jim. The motorized shaft and tip machines available today for the hobbyist are pricey, costing from $700 and up.

The good news is a new machine will be available in a couple of weeks designed especially for the home user. The machine will spin all shaft types with a variable speed 2500 rpm motor which will enable us to clean, smoothe and condition cue shafts up to 31" long and replace, shape and burnish tips in a matter of minutes.

All tip replacement supplies will be included and the price should be around $385.
Feel free to PM or email me if you'd like to know more!
Happy Holidays,
Rip

PQQLK9
12-04-2003, 09:41 AM
That sounds like something I gotta have Rip.
Keep me posted.

Chicago9Ball
12-04-2003, 12:42 PM
Popcorn,what type of modification needs to be done to use the mini lathes for tip replacement?

Fred Agnir
12-04-2003, 03:35 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chicago9Ball:</font><hr> Popcorn,what type of modification needs to be done to use the mini lathes for tip replacement? <hr /></blockquote> You need to make a collet to hold the shaft, and you need to make a steady rest as the joint-end will be cantilevered to the left and through the headstock.

For trimming, some of the softer tips, IMO don't trim well with single-point tools. So, I've been using the razor blade technique. It works best if you buy a cupped live center (available from Hightower)to steady the tip head, but I've been going without for a while. Pressing my luck I guesss.

PM an e-mail address, and I'll send you pictures of my setup.

Fred