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woody_968
12-22-2003, 01:44 PM
Have any of you gone to the Cue U College? If so what are your thoughts on it or any other program like that.

I would prefer to take lessons at regular intervals from someone close by, but have also thought about trying to get into teaching and think it would help to have some type of certifications. I know its not like a graduate college type thing, but for BCA and some of the other types of endorsements someone may want to have you have to attend a certain number of hours with certified instructors.

Thanks for any input.

pooltchr
12-22-2003, 02:00 PM
Woody,
I got my certification through Cue-tech with randyg who posts regularly on this board. I suspect the master academy programs are similar. I do know that in order to advance beyond the second level, you will sooner or later need to work with different master instructors. You can contact the BCA through their web site and get information about the instructor certification program. And yes, it's well worth the money!

www.bca-pool.com (http://www.bca-pool.com)

Steve

randyg
12-22-2003, 05:47 PM
WOODY: Bob Radford is the BCA Master Instructor at Cue-U. He has one of the best Schools in the country. His class is perfect for what you are looking for. Hopefully we will see you in the BCA ranks as an instructor.....randyg

randyg
12-22-2003, 05:49 PM
POOLTCHR: You must be getting close for your upgrade....randyg

griffith_d
12-22-2003, 09:34 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> Woody,
I got my certification through Cue-tech with randyg who posts regularly on this board. I suspect the master academy programs are similar. I do know that in order to advance beyond the second level, you will sooner or later need to work with different master instructors. You can contact the BCA through their web site and get information about the instructor certification program. And yes, it's well worth the money!

www.bca-pool.com (http://www.bca-pool.com)

Steve <hr /></blockquote>

To get to be an instructor, and this may sound ignornant, but is there a certain level of play that you have to attain, win certain number of games, make certain shots, know the diamond system, beat certain designated players...what?

Griff

pooltchr
12-23-2003, 07:00 AM
There isn't a magic number of games/tournaments to qualify. The biggest thing is you have to have enough ability to not only explain, but be able to demonstrate the different aspects of the course. For instance, if you can't show a student how to control a draw shot, you would have a hard time teaching it. As a general rule, I would think that most APA 6 or 7 sl would probably have the skills. But it's also about being able to communicate at a level that will be understood by the students. The good thing is that you have to work with a master instructor, and they are pretty good at teaching these skills. Personally, I think it's a great program. Not only did Randy teach me a lot about teaching the course, but I also learned some skills that have made my own game better. I have noticed that every time I teach a new student, my own fundamentals seem to improve, and in many cases, I end up learning something from the students as well.

pooltchr
12-23-2003, 07:02 AM
Randy. Last time I checked, I think I had about 24 or 25 in. I think I need 30. Will talk in Vegas and try to schedule a date for that. Thanks! sj

bluewolf
12-23-2003, 07:22 AM
I was on the site and noticed a person has to complete a course as a student at a recognized bca academy such as the course Randy g teaches ,before taking the instructor course, if I read correctly.

What is the difference between certified and advanced?

Laura~~not ready to teach by far,just curious

pooltchr
12-29-2003, 09:07 AM
Laura,
You have already been through Randy's student course so that isn't a problem for you. Send him a PM if you are interested in the instructor certification and I'm sure he can work something out with you. Only a Master instructor can recommend you for the instructor program. I believe Randy, Bob, Jerry, and Fran are the only ones on the east coast right now. I heard that another master academy might be coming to Ohio soon, but don't know the details.

There are 4 different levels of instructor; recognized, certified, advanced and master. You have to work up through each level. There's no way to skip a level. Even the pro's including Allison, Karen, and Gerta had to start at the recognized level. The BCA has a book that spells it all out, and I think it is on their web site as well.
Steve

Fred Agnir
12-29-2003, 10:02 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> Only a Master instructor can recommend you for the instructor program. I believe Randy, Bob, Jerry, and Fran are the only ones on the east coast right now. <hr /></blockquote>
Occasional CCBer Ken Tewksbury is also a Master Instructor on the East Coast.

http://billiardinstructor.org/

Fred &lt;~~~ is RandyG on the East Coast?

Scott Lee
12-29-2003, 10:16 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> Only a Master instructor can recommend you for the instructor program.

There are 4 different levels of instructor; recognized, certified, advanced and master. You have to work up through each level. There's no way to skip a level. Even the pro's including Allison, Karen, and Gerta had to start at the recognized level. The BCA has a book that spells it all out, and I think it is on their web site as well.
Steve <hr /></blockquote>

Steve...This is not correct. You do not have to be "recommended" by a master instructor, to begin the instructor certification process at a master academy. Anyone can contact any pool school, and arrange to enter an instructor certification program, beginning with the 'recognized' level, and progressing over the years (as you and I are doing) towards higher levels of certification.

Oh, and btw, last time I checked an atlas, Rockford, IL (Bob Radford), and Madison, WI (Jerry Briesath) were NOT located on the east coast...they are in the great American Midwest! LOL Of course, RandyG travels to the east coast, but he is located in Dallas, TX...nowhere NEAR the east coast! LOL

Scott

Qtec
12-29-2003, 10:35 AM
[ QUOTE ]
Steve...This is not correct. You do not have to be "recommended" by a master instructor, to begin the instructor certification process at a master academy. Anyone can contact any pool school, and arrange to enter an instructor certification program, beginning with the 'recognized' level, and progressing over the years (as you and I are doing) towards higher levels of certification.

<hr /></blockquote>

Scott, you make it sound as if anyone can become an instuctor, whether they can play the game or not.

that cant be true.

i,m sure I read somewhere that you had to be coaching for at least two years before being considered for the course.

Q

Fred Agnir
12-29-2003, 11:12 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr> <hr /></blockquote>


i,m sure I read somewhere that you had to be coaching for at least two years before being considered for the course.

Q <hr /></blockquote>What constitutes "coaching"?

Fred &lt;~~~ been coaching for over 15 years, I guess

duey_t
12-29-2003, 02:36 PM
Based on my knowledge of Cue U and Bob Radford I would say there is no coaching or playing requirement! No pool player in this area ever heard of him before he became an instructor. He has followed the BCA rules to become an instructor because he had an interest apparently. I have not attended his school and would not even consider it under any circumstances.

pooltchr
12-29-2003, 03:00 PM
Alright Scott....so geography wasn't one of my stronger classes. Let's say "more easily accessable" from the east coast. LOL

I will PM you about the other part.
Steve

Scott Lee
12-29-2003, 04:41 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote duey_t:</font><hr> Based on my knowledge of Cue U and Bob Radford I would say there is no coaching or playing requirement! No pool player in this area ever heard of him before he became an instructor. He has followed the BCA rules to become an instructor because he had an interest apparently. I have not attended his school and would not even consider it under any circumstances. <hr /></blockquote>

duey_t...It sounds from your post, that you are saying Bob Radford is "less than qualified" to be teaching. Nothing could be further from the truth. It is a rigorous process to become Master Certified, and you must demonstrate a very strong knowledge of pool skills, as well as the ability to communicate them on several different levels. It's true that some Master Instructors may be better than others, however, Bob Radford has the necessary skills (not to mention a state-of-the-art teaching facility), and is considered one of America's better instructors!

Just because, as you say, "noone ever heard of him before", means nothing. As Steve mentioned, you must demonstrate your abilities to better instructors than yourself, before you will be considered for higher certification levels.

Scott Lee

duey_t
12-29-2003, 05:31 PM
Hi Scott,

Glad to see all you "instructors" stick together so well! My response was to Qtec in regards to being an instructor whether or not a person can play the game. If you read more into that then I'm not surprised.

Mr. Radford has indeed attended the classes and fulfilled the BCA requirements. Does that make him even an average player? No.

I used to believe that the term "Master instructor" had some meaning in regards to playing ability but now I know better. There are many master level instructors that I am familiar with who are good players such as Randy G, Tom "Dr Cue" Rossman, Jerry Briseth and yourself who I would highly recommend to anyone.

In regards to Cue U, sorry, but it does not get my vote.

dmgwalsh
12-30-2003, 05:36 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote duey_t:</font><hr> Hi Scott,

Glad to see all you "instructors" stick together so well! My response was to Qtec in regards to being an instructor whether or not a person can play the game. If you read more into that then I'm not surprised.

Mr. Radford has indeed attended the classes and fulfilled the BCA requirements. Does that make him even an average player? No.

I used to believe that the term "Master instructor" had some meaning in regards to playing ability but now I know better. There are many master level instructors that I am familiar with who are good players such as Randy G, Tom "Dr Cue" Rossman, Jerry Briseth and yourself who I would highly recommend to anyone.

In regards to Cue U, sorry, but it does not get my vote.



<hr /></blockquote>

Duey- I see that you are from Rockford. i was born there and lived a lot of years there. I was curious as to why you give a thumbs down to Radford. Have you met him? Been taught by him? gone to his facility? played him?
I was curious about him and called. i wanted to look at his place, but I guess it's some kind of mystery. He wouldn't tell me where it is. They probably blindfold you when they transport you to their facility.

On another note, does Dallas West have a place in Rockford now? Do you ever play with him or see him play? Does he give straight pool lessons?

Fred Agnir
12-30-2003, 07:57 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote duey_t:</font><hr> I used to believe that the term "Master instructor" had some meaning in regards to playing ability but now I know better. There are many master level instructors that I am familiar with who are good players such as Randy G, Tom "Dr Cue" Rossman, Jerry Briseth and yourself who I would highly recommend to anyone.

In regards to Cue U, sorry, but it does not get my vote.
<hr /></blockquote>I understand what you're saying and there is definitely a gray area... but by your implied reasoning then one could argue that none of the instructors you mention should get your vote of confidence.

With no disrespect to any of the fine instructors, none of them will be winning on the pro tour any time soon, except for Tom Rossman's World Championship in last year's Trick Shot Magic competition.

I really believe Master's Level Instructor weighs more on the ability to evaluate, communicate, and educate with the goal of pulling the best game out a student. Yes, there has to be a certain level of skill, but again, the gray area doesn't have a clear definition of what that skill set needs to be.

If Radford has the Masters Instructor title, it didn't come for free or by correspondence over the internet.

Fred

duey_t
12-30-2003, 08:10 AM
Hi Dennis,

The fact that the location is a secret is rather odd don't you think? A friend of mine purchased a cue and subsequently an extra shaft from Bob and each time he was met at the door and not allowed to view the "state of the art" facility.

The location is inside the old National Lock building on 7th Street &amp; 18th Avenue. Nothing to see from the outside but you can see a few pics on his website of the interior. He uses several of the antique Brunswick tables that used to reside at State &amp; Madison.

Yes, I have met Bob and played a league match against his team. While I have never taken a lesson from him I do know of a local player who did take a lesson and he "filled me in" on his experience.

In regards to Dallas, he still does maintain a small room on Kishwaukee Street where he does give lessons. He does visit a private club just down the street from his room where he plays 3 cushion every now and then.

dmgwalsh
12-30-2003, 10:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote duey_t:</font><hr> Hi Dennis,

The fact that the location is a secret is rather odd don't you think? A friend of mine purchased a cue and subsequently an extra shaft from Bob and each time he was met at the door and not allowed to view the "state of the art" facility.

The location is inside the old National Lock building on 7th Street &amp; 18th Avenue. Nothing to see from the outside but you can see a few pics on his website of the interior. He uses several of the antique Brunswick tables that used to reside at State &amp; Madison.

Yes, I have met Bob and played a league match against his team. While I have never taken a lesson from him I do know of a local player who did take a lesson and he "filled me in" on his experience.

In regards to Dallas, he still does maintain a small room on Kishwaukee Street where he does give lessons. He does visit a private club just down the street from his room where he plays 3 cushion every now and then.



<hr /></blockquote>

I used to play a little at seventh street rec around 1970. There was another smaller spot about 4 blocks south of seventh street rec where the back entrance was a pool hall with either two or three tables and where the boys played cards in a separate room in the front facing the street. It was down by Eckstroms. Anyway, my brother worked there when he was about 18, collecting the dough on the card games and watching the tables. (My dad was one of the players in front). We played there a little bit, too. In about 1977, my brother got me into a little handicapped straight pool tournament at State and Madison, the guy gave me a good handicap, and I somehow got lucky and won. We used to play at Don Carter's and Fairview, too. Where do/did you play?

Can you pm me wth info on what your friend thought of the lesson? I've had several lessons with Scott Lee and he is very good. I was toying with te idea of going to Rockford for a weekend thing, since I'm in the neighbrhood. Thanks D

Qtec
12-30-2003, 10:15 AM
I would say that a 'level of competence'is required ,if not only for demonstration purposes. If an instuctor/coach[ I dont know what the difference is.] cant play a long draw himself,how can he teach someone else to do it.
You must know yourself that you need to have the confidence of the pupil to be able to help them. If you cant demonstrate what you teach you have a big problem, especially with younger pupils. Kids these days know everything better!

Imagine taking a tennis lesson and the coach who is teaching you the topspin backhand cant do it himself!

I totally agree with this,

[ QUOTE ]
I really believe Master's Level Instructor weighs more on the ability to evaluate, communicate, and educate with the goal of pulling the best game out a student. <hr /></blockquote>

Q