PDA

View Full Version : Is the Blue book ruining the pool cue market?



Alex_Delodge
12-25-2003, 02:33 PM
(What is the blue book? see this amazing article I found on the blue book, which has a whole guide on what to look for when buying a cue: http://www.epinions.com/content_122551570052)

I am looking to sell one of my cues. I was looking for pricing online to find out what is should go for because the 1999 Blue Book of Pool Cues lists it at a much lower price than I think it should be at. Is this book artificially lowering cue prices? Think about it: since there's no other book for pricing cues, maybe the prices in the book are having a huge effect on prices in the market.

I know that samsaras have gone up and up in price, but the Blue book lists my model as only $1200. I think this is totally wrong, and will hurt my chances of selling for a fair price.

snook
12-25-2003, 03:07 PM
that first requires everyone having a blue book, which many dont, secondly, anybody wh is into pool enough to buy a blue book is also probably smart enough to know if your cue is worth more than its current "blue book" price.

so i think you'll be ok

Popcorn
12-25-2003, 03:51 PM
The value of a cue is like anything else, a willing buyer and a willing seller. Unlike other Bluebook pricing guides, the Blue Book of Pool Cues prices are not derived from current sales of cues. The price come strictly from the cuemakers. They fill in a form asking what they think their cues are worth. The numbers are completely arbitrary. The new book will be coming out in a few months and I would expect to see the prices different. But again they just come from the cuemakers, not some kind of market analysis. Ebay has improved what you can get for a cue. I sold a cue not long ago on ebay (Billy Stroud Joss) that I got $1000 more then the best offer I got locally. Tough to sell a cue locally in the pool room. Everybody wants something for nothing and resent paying you more, then they know you may have paid, even if it is worth it.

dg-in-centralpa
12-25-2003, 07:27 PM
I agree with Popcorn that ebay is the way to sell the cue. The blue book is good for identifying older cues, and in some instances I thought that some prices are over inflated to protect Brad Simpsons' cue collection. I've seen that done with the Elvis Presley record market years ago when I had my record stores.

DG - blue book is a guide only and not gospel

JohnBarton
12-25-2003, 09:23 PM
Ebay is a pretty good barometer of what a cue is worth - sometimes.....

At least on Ebay you have a large community of collectors, players and neophytes to look at the cues on offer.

Sometimes though, I see complete junk selling for hundreds of dollars when really good cues are being lowballed.

Life is weird.

John

Dakota Cues
12-25-2003, 09:28 PM
eBay isn't a bad place to sell cues. I have sold quite a few on there. I think the biggest thing about ebay is for people like me that live in a smaller (Bismarck ND) town where custom cues are pretty rare, none of the ones I had would have sold for a lot since people around here don't know that much about them. Ebay opens up the whole world. I have sold a handful of cues to buyers overseas (Taiwn, Singapore, etc.) and they are willing to pay top dollar for some of the right cues.

As far as the blue book, I would say this: The Blue Book is a good guide and offers at least a ball park figure of the value of cues. Of course, blue book value and actual market value are different, both in a good way AND a bad way. With me, if I'm looking to buy a cue I won't pay top dollar for it since I'm going to try and resell it. I'm trying to sell a good cue to someone that's been looking for this particular cue for a while and is willing to pay a good price for it. I'm not price-gouging in any way, but I'm not giving the cue away either.

Here's another thing to consider. I deal with a few cuemakers (Hercek, Searing, Tascarella, Ginacue) that actually have a waiting list for cues. Even if a potential buyer could actually buy the cue from the cuemaker for less, they would rather pay more and get the cue now than wait, in some cases YEARS, to get the exact same cue, and that's harder to put a value on.

Cueless Joey
12-25-2003, 09:36 PM
Agreed. I don't know how Samsara can appreciate value when they make a ton of cues.
The only cues that appreciate are the ones that are getting more recognition and aren't easy to get.
Somehow cuemakers who are known to make great hitting cues, like Searing, Jensen, Mace/Howard, Zylr and Gilbert, have very good selling value on Ebay.

tateuts
12-25-2003, 11:27 PM
Well, I have some bad news for you. I buy and sell a lot of cues and I think the Blue Book is more frequently listing values above current prices than below them. The fact is, $1200 cash can buy you a ton of cue in the secondhand market. A lot of people have an inflated idea of the value of their cue.

Did you think your Samsara would go up in value once it left the shop? Maybe it will in 20 years, but for now unless your cue is very special, unique, collectible, or very expensive to duplicate, I doubt it. If you have a relatively common Samsara six pointer - realistically you are looking at selling it for $700 - $1000 depending on condition.

That's not to say that Samsara's are not great and desireable cues. They are. However, you must realize that great cues depreciate less than not-so-great cues. So, while your may lose 30% of it's original cost, there are others that are losing 60%.

Chris

Alex_Delodge
12-26-2003, 12:53 AM
It's an early really nice samsara and I think I should be able to get $2,000 and I really need the money.

Ralph S.
12-26-2003, 02:10 AM
For starters, one minor, maybe even major problem is that you are using a book that is five years old. I would try to get ahold of the 2003 edition or wait a few months for the 2004 edition. Any kind of pricing guide eventually becomes outdated.

As for Blue Book ruining the buying and selling of used and collector cues, I disagree. This book is a very helpful tool from the identification of certain cues to giving a "general" idea of any cue under current market conditions.

In some respects, this is just like the stock market. It is also very comparable to other collectible hobbies such as sports cards. To give an example, it would be like a Balabushka cue and a Mickey Mantle rookie card. Both are rare, sought after, and very desirable. They will hold there value and most likely increase. The opposite would be a common $300.00 Viking cue and a Roger Clemens common card. Neither is likely to gain in value. They actually will be more likely to decrease slightly in value.

On another note, an item is only worth as much as somebody is willing to pay for it. E-bay would be a good route to try, since you will have a specific demographic of people looking for certain items.

If you have a picture of this cue, post it. I will be more than happy to see what my 2003 edition says in relation to your cue.

Dakota Cues
12-29-2003, 09:50 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Alex_Delodge:</font><hr> It's an early really nice samsara and I think I should be able to get $2,000 and I really need the money. <hr /></blockquote>

Alex,

Nothing personal here, but the only way that Samsara is worth $2K is if you paid roughly $3K for it. Samsara's are a great custom cue (based out of the same state as me), but because they make so many, and so many of the same model, they don't have good resale value.

You can try to put it up on ebay or some other site with a reserve of $2k, but like I said, I don't think it would hit that reserve if you paid anything close to that price for it...

Fred Agnir
12-30-2003, 08:03 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Dakota Cues:</font><hr> Nothing personal here, but the only way that Samsara is worth $2K is if you paid roughly $3K for it. Samsara's are a great custom cue (based out of the same state as me), but because they make so many, and so many of the same model, they don't have good resale value<hr /></blockquote>They make so many of the same model? Of a $3K cue? Could you expound on this?

Out of the same state as you? North Dakota? Could you expound on this too?

Fred

Popcorn
12-30-2003, 10:51 AM
Quote
"I will be more than happy to see what my 2003 edition says in relation to your cue".

You have a 2003 edition of the Blue Book of Pool cues?

Quote
"This book is a very helpful tool from the identification of certain cues to giving a "general" idea of any cue under current market conditions."

I don't think anyone has studied current market conditions, the prices are just made up by the cuemakers themselves.

ted harris
01-02-2004, 04:40 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr>Out of the same state as you? North Dakota? Could you expound on this too?

Fred <hr /></blockquote>
Samsara Cues
601 First St NE. Rugby, ND 58368 Tel (701)-776-7240 Fax (701)-776-7242

Fred Agnir
01-02-2004, 06:13 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ted harris:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr>Out of the same state as you? North Dakota? Could you expound on this too?

Fred <hr /></blockquote>
Samsara Cues
601 First St NE. Rugby, ND 58368 Tel (701)-776-7240 Fax (701)-776-7242 <hr /></blockquote> When'd they move? When did they start making "several of the $3K models"?

Fred