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sliprock
01-13-2004, 05:43 PM
I've recently started to do some cue repair. Last night, I got a request to replace a ferrule on a Viking cue. I've heard that the ferrules on a Viking have a threaded stud on the end of a short tenon, but wanted to find out before I accepted the job. Can someone shed some light on this?

If the ferrules are indeed attached with the threaded stud, can someone tell me where I can buy some replacements.. Thanks..

Popcorn
01-13-2004, 05:54 PM
You should be careful working on cues when you don't know how. You can end up replacing a $100. shaft doing a $10.00 repair. Do a lot of practice on junk cues. As far as the ferrule goes, although you can buy prefab ferrules, it is best to duplicate the original part from ferrule material and install it for a perfect fit. A badly installed ferrule can really screw up a cue.

Troy
01-13-2004, 06:02 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote sliprock:</font><hr> I've recently started to do some cue repair. Last night, I got a request to replace a ferrule on a Viking cue. I've heard that the ferrules on a Viking have a threaded stud on the end of a short tenon, but wanted to find out before I accepted the job. Can someone shed some light on this?

If the ferrules are indeed attached with the threaded stud, can someone tell me where I can buy some replacements.. Thanks.. <hr /></blockquote>

If you neeed to ask, I suggest that you require much more practice on "junk" cues prior to taking in a customer cue for repair.

Troy...~~~ Had a mentor at the start.

Cueless Joey
01-13-2004, 06:06 PM
If it is, order a ferrule from Viking that fits that one.
To take the old ferrule out, you can either use a paint remover gun or turn the shaft on the lathe and heat up the ferrule with thick leather on the lathe while it's spinning.
It will melt the glue. Don't use a blow torch though like one hack did to my ferrule one time.
The worst you can do is drilling the boring the shaft, thread the inside with a 5/16 18 tenon and gluing the ferrule.
Seen my local repairman do this a few times.

woody_968
01-13-2004, 06:16 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cueless Joey:</font><hr> Don't use a blow torch though like one hack did to my ferrule one time.
Seen my local repairman do this a few times.
<hr /></blockquote>

I knew a guy one time that said he could replace a ferrule. So some guy gives him a shaft to have it done, he was having trouble getting the old one off so he took a hammer and hit it thinking he could break the ferrule off /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Needles to say he ended up buying a new shaft.

Cueless Joey
01-13-2004, 07:50 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote woody_968:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cueless Joey:</font><hr> Don't use a blow torch though like one hack did to my ferrule one time.
Seen my local repairman do this a few times.
<hr /></blockquote>
Hell, Woody. Your hack is worse than my hack.
My hack though, uses that freaking 60 grit disk wheel contraption to flatten out the ferrule.
He's no longer repairing cues.
I knew a guy one time that said he could replace a ferrule. So some guy gives him a shaft to have it done, he was having trouble getting the old one off so he took a hammer and hit it thinking he could break the ferrule off /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Needles to say he ended up buying a new shaft. <hr /></blockquote>

sliprock
01-14-2004, 09:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> You should be careful working on cues when you don't know how. You can end up replacing a $100. shaft doing a $10.00 repair. Do a lot of practice on junk cues. As far as the ferrule goes, although you can buy prefab ferrules, it is best to duplicate the original part from ferrule material and install it for a perfect fit. A badly installed ferrule can really screw up a cue. <hr /></blockquote>


I understand that your response is meant to be helpful but it's not. I've been practicing on "junk" cues for a while. I've replaced quite a few ferrules as well as other minor repairs. I'm more than comfortable with having to fabricate a matching part from blank material, but I've never done a ferrule replacement on a Viking.

My original post was to gain information as to how Viking builds their cues. I understand that different cuebuilders have different methods of construction and I'm comfortable with adapting to matching those differences. I was hoping that someone could give me some info as to what I might run into. I'm looking for info such as taps that I might need etc. If you have any helpful information concerning the construction of Viking cues, then I thank you. If you can't provide anything, I thank you for your original post as it truly is great advice. Advice that I took to heart, last year when I started practicing on junk cues..

sliprock
01-14-2004, 10:26 AM
<hr /></blockquote>If you neeed to ask, I suggest that you require much more practice on "junk" cues prior to taking in a customer cue for repair.

Troy...~~~ Had a mentor at the start. <hr /></blockquote>

I appreciate your concern, but did you blindly accept cue repair work when you were starting out? Your signature line states that you "had a mentor at the start". Did you accept the work before talking with your mentor? I don't have the luxery of consulting a mentor. I was hoping that some of the "cue guys' on this forum would be willing to share a little knowledge about this repair, prior to my accepting the job.

Troy
01-14-2004, 11:01 AM
No, I did NOT blindlt accept repair work when I was starting out. I would only accept that work for which I felt comfortable and had some prior experience. I started by doing tips on house cues. If I needed a ferrule replaced I would practice on a broken cue after input from my mentor.

To answer your original question, both Meuller's and Atlas have a selection of ferrules.

Troy...~~~ Good Luck !!!
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote sliprock:</font><hr>
I appreciate your concern, but did you blindly accept cue repair work when you were starting out? Your signature line states that you "had a mentor at the start". Did you accept the work before talking with your mentor? I don't have the luxery of consulting a mentor. I was hoping that some of the "cue guys' on this forum would be willing to share a little knowledge about this repair, prior to my accepting the job. <hr /></blockquote>