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View Full Version : Stepping BACK from shot??



phil in sofla
01-26-2004, 07:13 PM
I've noticed that I'm frequently stepping back from my shot lining up stance to get down on the shot.

This would appear the opposite of the recommendation to step INTO the shot, and I guess I'm setting up my feet appropriately to where I'm going to be bridging, rather than where my back foot should eventually be. I'm also 6'2", if that makes any difference.

Looking for feedback on this. Do you think it's a problem, and it would be better to be setting up further back and stepping into the shot? I should add that MAYBE this only occurs on the break shot, where I bridge from the side rail (not sure about that). If it is only the break shot, would that make any difference?

houstondan
01-26-2004, 09:40 PM
seems that the "step into the shot" stuff starts with the idea that you line up the shot from way back and then move into the table. as i understand it, the questions are really, are you comfortable in the stance? are you balanced so you're able to lift your bridge hand without falling on your face? sounds kinda like an "if it aint broke...."thing.

dan

tateuts
01-26-2004, 10:15 PM
I used to do the same thing and changed it. I think stepping forward into position is a very important positive move which I've incorporated it into my pre-shot routine so it is now habit. Personally, I miss fewer shots with this sort of set up.

You might just want to test this on yourself by spending a little time sinking long shots. I think that after you adjust to it, you'll find as I did that this is a comfortable and stable way to get on the shot and to be as accurate as possible.

Chris

Foxtrott
01-26-2004, 11:00 PM
Id have to agree with Dan, I shoot side stroke and have had tons of people tell me the correct way to shoot when I fist meet them .Usually after Im about 40 balls ahead they get quiet about it . Yes there is to be the basic priciple of stepping into a shot and a perfect way to hold your cue and to keep your site line etc etc etc . I have also seen so many good players also slump their game from dramatic changes that were to be the proper move. I would take that into consideration also . I mean take a look at Efrin and everyone and his brother is affraid of him . He follows the principles but you will see Efrin throw in a side stroke or a slip stroke when needed and have a strange stance and that is totally against the basic format that the books say we are to shoot but he is comfortable.Id go with the "if it aint broke theory{" as Dan stated also" but if you are not consistant with what you are doing then I would definatly seek dramatic changes .Id rather be consistantly bad than not consistant at all as that way when I made changes it effects my whole game evenly and not just in a certain situation .If you notice there are alot of great certin situation shooters out there but not many consistant shooters . If you feel comfortable with what you are doing now and your bridge is good and your stroke is good and you are consistant with what you are doing I would start with smaller changes if you are unhappy with your game . This is a true story : I know a now famous cue maker that went into a slup on his game years back. Now the guy could shoot a ton but when he started makeing cues his game went a down .He went to a school for training in pool .I have seen people that have left this same school with a better game. This person came back with an impressive looking game . All the basics were in line and he looked like a pro on tvman just the perfect looking game . When he went to this scholl he could run about 50 balls when he came out he could run about 15 but he sure did it the correct way.Now he dont shoot anymore and that is a shame as he was a great player but I think too many things got into his head at once . I would second guess making dramatic changes . But that is just me . I shoot wrong anyhoo.
Fox

Perk
01-27-2004, 10:29 AM
I am probably a bit different than most, but I step into the shot. I feel a weird feeling of confidence/cockiness when I do this. I am not sure how I came to doing this, but after watching others do this, I started. Now its almost like it relaxes me, gets my thoughts on the particular shot (nothing else).

I agree though. If its not broke dont fix it. Most importantly you should have a good supported stance. Good luck.

Iowashark
01-27-2004, 10:42 AM
I never really thought about this until now but when I get down on the shot my back foot is stepping back into position, as well. When I line up the shot I get my bridge hand into position as well as my front foot, then when I get down for the shot it is my back foot stepping back, not my front foot stepping forward. Just for the record Phil, I'm 6'4 and maybe this stepping back process is more comfortable for taller players.

pooltchr
01-27-2004, 10:54 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Iowashark:</font><hr> I never really thought about this until now but when I get down on the shot my back foot is stepping back into position, as well. When I line up the shot I get my bridge hand into position as well as my front foot, then when I get down for the shot it is my back foot stepping back, not my front foot stepping forward. Just for the record Phil, I'm 6'4 and maybe this stepping back process is more comfortable for taller players. <hr /></blockquote>

RandyG taught me that same thing. Once you think you are down on your shot, kick back your back foot and it brings you down further without bending and straining the lower back. Not only good for tall players, but great for us old guys who don't bend as well as we used to.

JimS
01-28-2004, 06:49 AM
I guess I do both. I step forward...and it feels agressive (!), after making my shot plan standing back. After feet are planted, and I've checked my body line-up with the aim line, I bend, then step back a little further with the back foot in order to bend at the knees. Not tall. Old. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

edit: old and incorrect....that's not what I do, it's what I thought I did but after "watching" myself for a while it's not what I do...at least not when I get set up right.

The only time I was re-setting my feet was when I wasn't taking care to get my body aimed properly. I tend to take care aiming while down but do a haphazard job of aiming while standing....where the care should be taken.

I'm hard-headed and slow to change. I'd never heard of or considered aiming while standing until I came around here and it's been hard for me to grasp the importance of that practice.

It's becoming more and more clear to me that aiming is all about getting down on the shot already aimed.

So...I've found that I move my feet only when I'm improperly alinged and I should just get up and start over.

charlieb
01-28-2004, 10:36 PM
For what it is worth--Bert Kinister on his "Advanced Fundamentals" tape says to align yourself, he has an interesting way of doing this, and then step back. His alignment procedure is to face the shot with your cue held at the balance point (approx) with the cue acoss your body and let the cue swing naturally back across your body until it is lined up with aiming path. This automatically lines up your shoulder, elbow and wrist with the shot and allows either a pendulum or piston stroke. You then step back and stroke. Different but sound.

phil in sofla
01-30-2004, 06:42 PM
Interesting reminder, as I have that tape, and may have incorporated that into my shooting and didn't realize the source of it.