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View Full Version : PVC Ferrules WARNING



MaineEAck
04-22-2002, 12:43 PM
Just a warning to anyone out there who is planing on buying the PVC/ABS Ferrules from Meuller... (I know pvc is not a good quality but thats what people around here wanted) They say 5/16" Threaded interior. They are not threaded. I just had to send all of mine back, and now have to wait a long time before I can get any more... WHAT A HASTLE I guess it is a miss-Print in the Catalog.

Cueless Joey
04-22-2002, 05:02 PM
I know they are the cheapest kind. I think melamine ferrules are the best of all synthetics.

Harold Acosta
04-22-2002, 07:38 PM
They probably didn't have the threaded ferrules and sent you the non-threads. It is your choice to keep or send back. They will give you credit or refund your money.

I have noticed that they are not keeping stock of a lot of items. Maybe there having some problems, who knows?

They are still a good choice for many other items....

TomBrooklyn
04-22-2002, 07:50 PM
Are threaded ferrules generally preferable to non-threaded? Seems like they would be more rigidly attached with the threads.

Harold Acosta
04-22-2002, 07:57 PM
In PR, we prefer fibre ferrules instead of PVC's, unless you have a Meucci. Most of the ferrules I work with are non-thread unless the shaft of some of the cues have the threaded one.

Most people don't know what type of ferrule they have unless it has broken-off entirely. So in a sense, ferrule preference depends on the cues in your area, and the knowledge of some of the people on what they really want.

Troy
04-22-2002, 08:00 PM
Also more contact surface for epoxy/glue.

In response to another post re Meueller's stock, I ordered their "deluxe" rubber bumpers for house cue repair about a month ago and they are on back-order until June.... JUNE.....

Troy

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: TomBrooklyn:</font><hr> Are threaded ferrules generally preferable to non-threaded? Seems like they would be more rigidly attached with the threads. <hr></blockquote>

Chris Cass
04-22-2002, 08:21 PM
Hi Troy,

Why not go through http://www.cuestik.com?
Most items in stock and ship 24hrs from receiving the order.

Regards,

C.C.

MaineEAck
04-22-2002, 08:24 PM
I don't b/c I don't have the tap to tap the ferrules after I cut them, I like to sue threaded ferrules.

Troy
04-22-2002, 08:32 PM
Thanks Chris, I do go to Atlas on occasion. But, first, Atlas has a $50 minimum order &amp; I'm not always ordering that much stuff, and second, the bumpers at Atlas are not as good and cost more.

Troy

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Chris Cass:</font><hr> Hi Troy,

Why not go through <a target="_blank" href=http://www.cuestik.com?>http://www.cuestik.com?</a>
Most items in stock and ship 24hrs from receiving the order.

Regards,

C.C.
<hr></blockquote>

04-22-2002, 08:33 PM
Thanks for the warning. I have been worried about this ever since the war in Afghanistan broke out. Now I can get a good nights sleep. Whew!

Troy
04-22-2002, 08:34 PM
Your Dad works as a Machinist and you don't have access to a Tap ????? Yet you have a die for the tenon ????? Very curious indeed..... /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif By the way, Atlas offers threaded ferrules.

Troy

&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class=&amp;quot;small&amp;quot;&gt;Quote: MaineEAck:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt; I don't b/c I don't have the tap to tap the ferrules after I cut them, I like to sue threaded ferrules. &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;

MaineEAck
04-22-2002, 08:36 PM
The metal taps they use are like 8" thick and get about as course as 2 TPI

Troy
04-22-2002, 08:39 PM
Thanks for the contribution

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Anonymous:</font><hr> Thanks for the warning. I have been worried about this ever since the war in Afghanistan broke out. Now I can get a good nights sleep. Whew! <hr></blockquote>

TonyM
04-22-2002, 10:47 PM
"Are threaded ferrules generally preferable to non-threaded? Seems like they would be more rigidly attached with the threads."

This is a cuemaker specific issue. I personally never thread a ferrule on, nor am I ever likely to. They are not as well centered (play in the threads), weaken the tenon too much, add too much labour, and with the quality of glues today a ferrule is not likely to ever fail at the glue joint anyway (unless it was botched up).

The cheap thermoplastic ferrules found on many import cues are threaded because the ferrule materials do not glue well. But the bond between a thermoset ferrule material (phenolic, melamin etc.) is so good that the threading is just not needed. I like to drill, and then ream my ferrules so that the fit between ferrule and tenon is very precise.

Other cuemaker's do this also, so I'm not alone (Cognescenti for example).

Tony
-no threads for me, or did you all get that?

Cueless Joey
04-23-2002, 02:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: TonyM:</font><hr> "Are threaded ferrules generally preferable to non-threaded? Seems like they would be more rigidly attached with the threads."

This is a cuemaker specific issue. I personally never thread a ferrule on, nor am I ever likely to. They are not as well centered (play in the threads), weaken the tenon too much, add too much labour, and with the quality of glues today a ferrule is not likely to ever fail at the glue joint anyway (unless it was botched up).

The cheap thermoplastic ferrules found on many import cues are threaded because the ferrule materials do not glue well. But the bond between a thermoset ferrule material (phenolic, melamin etc.) is so good that the threading is just not needed. I like to drill, and then ream my ferrules so that the fit between ferrule and tenon is very precise.

Other cuemaker's do this also, so I'm not alone (Cognescenti for example).

Tony
-no threads for me, or did you all get that? <hr></blockquote>......
Tony, I've seen enough unthreaded ferrules become unglued to convince me that threading them is the way to go. I have never seen a threaded ferrule come lose.
Lucasi and Meucci who don't thread their ferrules keep cue rapair business going.

Troy
04-23-2002, 10:01 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Cueless Joey:</font><hr> &lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote: TonyM:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt; "Are threaded ferrules generally preferable to non-threaded? Seems like they would be more rigidly attached with the threads."

This is a cuemaker specific issue. I personally never thread a ferrule on, nor am I ever likely to. They are not as well centered (play in the threads), weaken the tenon too much, add too much labour, and with the quality of glues today a ferrule is not likely to ever fail at the glue joint anyway (unless it was botched up).

The cheap thermoplastic ferrules found on many import cues are threaded because the ferrule materials do not glue well. But the bond between a thermoset ferrule material (phenolic, melamin etc.) is so good that the threading is just not needed. I like to drill, and then ream my ferrules so that the fit between ferrule and tenon is very precise.

Other cuemaker's do this also, so I'm not alone (Cognescenti for example).

Tony
-no threads for me, or did you all get that? &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;......
Tony, I've seen enough unthreaded ferrules become unglued to convince me that threading them is the way to go. I have never seen a threaded ferrule come lose.
Lucasi and Meucci who don't thread their ferrules keep cue rapair business going. <hr></blockquote>

As TonyM said, not likely to fail unless botched.

I have seen numerous tips fall off with the first hit due to insufficient glue by the manufacturer.

Troy

TonyM
04-23-2002, 10:22 AM
Well Joey, I've seen many threaded ferrules come loose also. As for Meucci ferrules, they rarely come loose, but they do crack. Again, it is a case of thermoplastic ferrules not bonding well, not the method of attachment. Done correctly, a non-threaded ferrule will last a leftime.

Tony
-still no threads

04-23-2002, 02:03 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: TonyM:</font><hr> Well Joey, I've seen many threaded ferrules come loose also. As for Meucci ferrules, they rarely come loose, but they do crack. Again, it is a case of thermoplastic ferrules not bonding well, not the method of attachment. Done correctly, a non-threaded ferrule will last a leftime.

Tony

See, joey? You think you are always right? huh... just like mark23 ...pool expert wannabe like you. hahaha LOL
-still no threads <hr></blockquote>