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MrSecant
02-06-2004, 10:38 AM
I always start playing well, wether it be practice or a match against someone else, but then I get the inevitable bad rolls. I always get so frustrated at this that I lose my focus and I can't pull out of my bad streak. I eventually end up losing the game or storming off. This doesn't happen to me in any other aspect of my life and I don't normally get this frustrated at anything. Any advice?

UWPoolGod
02-06-2004, 11:03 AM
Hey I can tell you it has happened to everyone...it all snowballs like this:

Great he slopped in one
Man he slopped in another one
He missed but I am hooked..awesome
Hooked again..this guy is getting all the rolls.
GAWD CAN I GET A SHOT!
YOU HAVE GOT TO BE KIDDING ME!!!!
WHY ARE YOU DOING THIS TO ME GOD!!!!!!!!!

And then you are off your game. When I start getting these feeling I start to take deep long slow breaths with my eys closed and that gets me back in concentration. You know how you hold your breath, but you try to exhale with you mouth closed and you turn red or are about to pop- that is what it starts to get like for me...but proper breathing rituals can keep you in the zone and handle frustation. Just be able to calmly wait your turn to tear the lucky bastard a new A-hole. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Keith Talent
02-06-2004, 12:56 PM
As far as I'm concerned, nobody owes me a good roll. And a "bad roll" -- when I'm shooting, anyway -- is nothing but a misplayed shot. Either I was playing it too fine and not allowing enough margin for error, was deliberately playing a low percentage shot and just hoping it would come off, or I didn't really know the shot in the first place and was improvising.

As for your opponent's rolls, what can you do? But I can't ever recall in, say, a race to 7, not getting a game or two on good rolls.

Wayne
02-06-2004, 02:53 PM
My advise would be to do a lot of work on your attitude. It basically sucks in my opinion. It sounds like you are way too wound up if you are storming off from practice because of bad rolls (lol).

Every person that plays pool gets bad rolls but evey person also gets good rolls. I've learned to take the good with the bad (most of the time). Of course it is frustrating to get a bad roll but a lot of times they can be overcome by maintaining a good attitude.

However, sometimes the bad rolls just keep coming, sometimes for a match and sometimes for several days but eventually (if you realize the inevitability of this happening) it passes.

So my advise would be to take a chill pill and maybe laugh at yourself when you find yourself reacting in a childish way because it is pretty funny for someone to go storming off because they got a bad roll.

Since you dont have it in any other aspect of your life it should be pretty easy to overcome when you see how ridiculous you are being.

Hope this helps.

Wayne

Popcorn
02-06-2004, 07:18 PM
quote
"I eventually end up losing the game or storming off."

That is the telling statement. One of the things experience teaches you is, things change and a lot can be over come if you hang in there. If you quit before you get your fair share of rolls you will never win. I am going to tell you a secret. I used to run around on the road and one thing I could always count on, was players folding. Not because they lack the skill, but they lack the experience to know when things begin going bad they still don't have to lose. In almost every instance when a good local player get you stuck. Once you get even, if you do, they think it is over and assume you will go on to beat them, it becomes a self-fulfilling prophesy. They get mad at themselves because they were 10 games ahead and now they are even. It just means they have more work ahead of them if they want to win, thats all, but instead they go down the drain. Learning to hang in there is an important lesson, but if you quit every time, you will never know if you would have won or not. You may be a better player then you realize.

Chris Cass
02-06-2004, 08:35 PM
Hi Chris,

Believe it or not the thing that costs you the most is yourself. Don't think the other player doesn't know he just got lucky. This too weighs on your opponents mind. Some even laugh about it, to get under your skin or to let it go in their own mind.

The best advice I can give is to tell you, to just let it go when this happens. It seems the bigger the deal you make of it at the time, will hurt you more. It will come back and bite you in the a$$. Acknowledgement of it happening will be evident. This frustration only turns into throwing your focus and direction into a talespin. These things you can't change and if you let it, will effect your play bigtime.

It's like the shooter than slops one in and runs out after that. If you let this get you overly frustated and you show this to your opponent, it will keep happening. This behavior can pump him up. Next your taking low percentage shots and you miss.

Let me give you an example. Take the guy who makes a combo on the 9 ball and makes it. Then, his opponent trys making a combo on the 9 ball to get even mentally and misses. The opponent didn't let it go and probably had a run out but wanted to get even. This stuff all comes back. There's no justice in pool. There's no such thing as good rolls or bad. It's only bad shots and bad strategy. A good shot will give you good results. Well, the right shots will.

Luck, by your opponent missing a ball by a mile and then, sticks you in jail, happens. Take it with a grain of salt and it will be just that. You have to realize that luck is also a weakness your opponent exposed to you. You have to turn this into a positive and let it pump you up. He didn't play it, right? Therefore, what's to be intimidated from? It sure isn't someone who didn't play the shot from start to end. Remembering, the shots not complete when it goes in but when the cb ends up where you intended. I'm sure Scotty will agree with me on this one.

Funny, there's a kid, well about 30 yrs old named Brad. Brad, misses and gets totally off the wall. Slop one in on him or the balls don't roll right? He goes through the roof. My son Spike had to play him next. Spike asks me, how does he play? I told Spike, he plays very well but if he gets angry he loses control and always loses the match. Sure enough Brad missed and got pissed. Spike pounded on him after that. Tough, being beat by an 11 yr old. I know I wouldn't want to. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Any event, try keeping your cool and see what happens. Just do it for an experiment once. Then, come back and tell us about it. Watch some championship poker and try to exhibit the same behavior. I bet you survive.

Regards,

C.C.~~this is strickly imho.... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

stickman
02-07-2004, 01:50 AM
I don't know a player that doesn't become frustrated at times. I keep it in perspective by remembering that it's just a game. I'm serious when I play, and want to win, but it's not a life or death situation. I play for the love of the game. When it stops being fun, I consider that I could use my time doing something else. Since I have no control over luck, I have accept that there are times when an opponent will be the benefactor of some lucky breaks. I try to smile and remember that next time it might be my turn. It usually balances out over time. I will always miss a few shots, and it seems that it is usually the easy ones. Rather than dwelling on a bad shot, I try to let it go and focus on my next opportunity. I can't stay focused on my game, if I let myself think about the last shot I missed, or the nineball my opponent just slopped in. I can't win them all, but I win more when I focus on what I'm doing, rather than what has been done. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

CarolNYC
02-07-2004, 02:24 AM
[ QUOTE ]
I lose my focus <hr /></blockquote>
Are you focusing on the bad rolls you just got? If so, you HAVE to forget about the past and stay in the present-a friend once said to me "the the games you lose are the ones you give away!"I know its easier said then, done but you have to train your mind to just "let it go" and get back on the table and do what yo gotta do!
Like the saying goes "stick to the fight when your hardest hit, its when things seems worse that you must not quit!
Carol!Good luck! /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

recoveryjones
02-07-2004, 03:17 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote MrSecant:</font><hr> I always start playing well, wether it be practice or a match against someone else, but then I get the inevitable bad rolls. I always get so frustrated at this that I lose my focus and I can't pull out of my bad streak. I eventually end up losing the game or storming off. This doesn't happen to me in any other aspect of my life and I don't normally get this frustrated at anything. Any advice? <hr /></blockquote>

It's been my experience that in a race to 5 or 7 that the rolls generally even out.SOMETIMES however, the rolls are brutally one sided either in my favour or my opponents.SOMETIMES the game can be cruel and just not fair and yes that one sided unfairness can be frustrating at times.

Judging by your post the game isn't SOMETIMES frustrating....It's ALLWAYS inevitably frustrating as the bad rolls (for you) are ALLWAYS inevitably coming.

Every set and a lot of games (at the amatuer level)contain good and bad rolls.The better players shake their misfortune off and make the best of their upcoming opportunties, while the weaker players become frustrated. This frustration tightens up the muscles and tight muscles and a cluttered mind lead to guess what .....MORE BAD ROLLS.

In a constructive critism type of way I would say the problem might just be in your attitude.There's just no way that I'm going to believe that your allways on the wrong side of the bad rolls.There's a guy in my pool hall who smiles or laughs every time he gets a bad roll. He often goes on to win his matches.There's another fellow who gets mad at some misfortune and plays progressivly worse and loses.HE BEATS HIMSELF.

By saying you end up losing and storming off leads me to think that you are not enjoying the game.Maybe you have set yourself up for defeat by having unrealstic expectations of yourself(based on your skill level) and COULD BE suffering from perfectionism.

In summary, I don't mean to judge or play doctor based on an internet posting and my reply is mearly a suggestion. It is also based on experience.My attitude killed me many times in the past and thank God I've mellowed with age and my frustration is fewer and further between.

Skill level wins games and thats the bottom line.A good attitude combined with skill level wins even more games, no matter which way the balls roll.

Try this a solution.Go into every game expecting that yes realistically that some bad rolls will come.When they come just have a smile or a laugh and do your best to remedy the situation. If you do this I guareentee that you will win more games and be happier. Why do I know....because it's working for me. Take care , RJ

Vagabond
02-07-2004, 06:20 AM
It will relax your body and mind.Cheers
Vagabond /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

stickman
02-07-2004, 06:40 AM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

cheesemouse
02-07-2004, 08:06 AM
MrSecant,

I suspect the following is true:


All pool players experience the frustrations that result from the 'pool gods' sense of humor. I don't know how many p/gods there are but I suspect there are a whole bunch of the bastards...LOL...and everytime the balls get dropped on a pool table it's the wake up alarm for these jokesters.

What do the gods feed on? Who do they get their jollies off on? What gives them a good belly laugh, you know, what brings tears of joy to their eyes?.......I think it's attitude. The gods love bad attitudes, bad attitudes are the nectar of the gods. Bad attitudes make them drunk with joy. When they see a player with a bad attitude they order another round of drinks and slide right up to your table. I'm sure they give each other knowing glances when you arrive. They know they are in for a good time, a good laugh at your expense. They love you man.

How do you get the gods off your back?......first of all you have to get the joke and laugh along, even if the jokes on you. If you have a 'good attitude', hell, they may even let you tell a couple zingers of your own......


How do I know all this? Just yesterday the guy I was playing had the gods rolling on the floor and I was in on the joke... /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Sid_Vicious
02-07-2004, 10:35 AM
"There's a guy in my pool hall who smiles or laughs every time he gets a bad roll. He often goes on to win his matches.There's another fellow who gets mad at some misfortune and plays progressivly worse and loses.HE BEATS HIMSELF."

It's all answered right there. I remember in my earlier years that I'd get upset and blow my game to hell with external blaming. What I started doing was laughing inside, or at least smiling about the last roll, good or bad, and another trick is to make yourself an imaginary collection jar, and mentally go "clink" to insert a bad experience for review latter after I'm done. The sooner you get back into your game-face the sooner you will see your wins returning.

Believe me, I know all about nights with bad rolls stacking up against me, and I used to lose a lot just because of my attitude from then on. I'll also say that there are nights where I got all of the rolls, and my opponent ran himself into the ground with his anger.

I'm reluctant to see that you are an inherent grumbler like some have said, you are just in a phase that most, if not all of us, have gone through. The key though is the length of time you allow yourself to let it eat on you. If and when the rolls go against you entirely all day, forget about it. Those days are rare, but they DO happen from time to time. Smile, keep filling that jar, and worry about the why-me-pool-gods tomorrow...sid

CaptMorgan
02-07-2004, 12:01 PM
I'm new to the boards here but old to the game and everyone has experienced frustration on the table, regardless of their skill level. The difference between us and the pro's in a large aspect is the ability to learn from your own mistakes. You first have to learn that when you're at the table their are no bad rolls, there are no pool gods who punish, there are no exscuses aside from the ones you make yourself. Your shot is your shot, good or bad. When I make a bad shot the first thing I do is look at the table and replay the situation. Many people that don't know me are sometimes confused by this b/c I will literally walk the table and appear to be shooting again but really I'm just trying to think of how I could have made the shot better. So learn first and be mad later. You'll soon find that you'll keep yourself so busy learning from your mistakes that there won't be anytime for frustration and anger. This takes time, patience, and most of all self discipline. But overcoming the mental lowpoints will allow you to become more tunned in to your own ability level and your shot selection will become better and your abilities will increase moderately overtime as become more confident.

MrSecant
02-09-2004, 07:37 AM
thanks for all the advice. i'll give it a try.

cycopath
02-09-2004, 03:51 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr>What I started doing was laughing inside, or at least smiling about the last roll, good or bad, <hr /></blockquote>

I have a couple of the Accu-Stats 8Ball Invitational matches on tape with Roger Griffis playing. And you can see him clearly smile and even kind of chuckle to himself when he follows out of line on the table. The worse the shape the more he chuckles.

Bob_Jewett
02-09-2004, 09:32 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote MrSecant:</font><hr> I always start playing well, whether it be practice or a match against someone else, but then I get the inevitable bad rolls. I always get so frustrated ... Any advice? <hr /></blockquote>

I think you need a stronger fix than you'll get from the suggestions written here. I urge you to get, read, and re-read two books:

"The Inner Game of Tennis" -- Timothy Gallwey

"The Pleasures of Small Motions" -- Bob Fancher

Together they'll cost less than $30, they are both enjoyable to read, and I think they will be both useful in developing a more positive attitude.

cheesemouse
02-10-2004, 09:28 AM
Bob,

These are the only two 'head' books that I would recommened for the pool player. It is reassuring to have someone of your standing in the pool industry agree with me....LOL /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

It is nice to have your input back on the board, sir.......thanks for joining in.

9ballbc
02-10-2004, 10:26 AM
I played a guy name Gene Robinson, a former pro player, a few times. He has the worst anger management problem I've ever seen! We were racing to 5 on my table...I broke and ran the first 3 racks then safed him up in the 4th rack. I heard a sound after the break and run of the 3rd rack and he was rubbing is chest....immediately after the safety in the 4th game I glanced over at him and he punched his own chest very hard! It really bothered me...he didn't get a hit, I took ball in hand on the hill and fell apart. He ran 2 racks, broke and made the 9, broke and ran a couple to combo the 9, and then we were all tied up. I lost that set in the final game. Strange that he had a problem dealing with frustration but it didn't bother the way he played...it BOTHERED ME! Kinda funny now when I think about.

TheButler
02-17-2004, 02:26 PM
I have a hard problem with controlling my anger on the pool table. I have broke a Joss sneaky pete and a Meucci Freshman 4 over my knee as a result of my anger. I dont get mad at anybody but myself. Ive tried to control it, but something happens and I just go off.

dooziexx
02-17-2004, 09:24 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote TheButler:</font><hr> I have a hard problem with controlling my anger on the pool table. I have broke a Joss sneaky pete and a Meucci Freshman 4 over my knee as a result of my anger. I dont get mad at anybody but myself. Ive tried to control it, but something happens and I just go off. <hr /></blockquote>

Butler,
Keep your composure and never let your opponent know how you feel. Once they find that out, they will take advantage of it and you'll eventually lose your match. When you make a mistake, dont be pissing and moaning. Nothing you can do about that mistake. Learn from it. Calm yourself down and play the game one shot at a time. Hope that helps.

recoveryjones
02-17-2004, 09:38 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bob_Jewett:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote MrSecant:</font><hr> I always start playing well, whether it be practice or a match against someone else, but then I get the inevitable bad rolls. I always get so frustrated ... Any advice? <hr /></blockquote>

I think you need a stronger fix than you'll get from the suggestions written here. I urge you to get, read, and re-read two books:

"The Inner Game of Tennis" -- Timothy Gallwey

"The Pleasures of Small Motions" -- Bob Fancher

Together they'll cost less than $30, they are both enjoyable to read, and I think they will be both useful in developing a more positive attitude. <hr /></blockquote>

I've got both these books and thought they were both excellent especially "The Inner Game of Tennis" Also read Phil Capelle's "A mind for Pool" and The Monks "Point the Way" and altough there was the odd tid bit of info(and lots of filler), I wasn't to impressed. RJ

Rod
02-17-2004, 09:59 PM
I've learned over the years frustration spells doom. You can't do anything well when your frustrared, let alone play a mental game like pool.

I played a guy just like you today. I haven't played for a few days so I was a bit slow and rusty. Well everything went his way. I got some real bad rolls. Speaking of rolls we all get them,real bad, bad, not so good, pretty good and great. I didn't expect anything great, bad, or good, I just accept them. I know however when I play for a while it always gets better because I get warmed up and start hitting them much better.

To make this short, with focused concentration, no matter what happened earlier, I pulled myself out of a rut. He however started playing bad and complained about every bad roll. It was his fault and he was not willing to accept that fact. His stroke turned into a punch with 3 c/b fouls by double hitting the c/b. He said it was not a good day and should have quit earlier. I said you were making everything when we first started. He could not dispute that himself. Some people play good and just a missed shot or a bad roll or two set them off. They can't beat anyone in their condition, especially a good player. Just accept what happens. Make a mental note and don't make the same mistake again. To play this game in the heat of competion, you have to give it your best focused concentration, nothing less will do. You'll never do that with a poor attitude. Work your way through that just one time and you'll start to know what it takes to win at this game, no matter your level of play.

Rod

KAM007
02-22-2004, 05:25 PM
There is a good story at billiardworld.com written by Jim Meador entitled " Jackass shooting pool syndrome ". Its under the tips n tales section. I ran across it after blowing a tournament and started looking for stuff to read on billiards on the web. As frustrating as pool can be sometimes, it's a great game. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Dagwood
02-22-2004, 05:50 PM
I've heard it refered to, and refered to it as a form of chinese torture...but yet we keep returning. We must be masochistic....

Dags

bluewolf
02-23-2004, 01:05 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote MrSecant:</font><hr> I always start playing well, wether it be practice or a match against someone else, but then I get the inevitable bad rolls. I always get so frustrated at this that I lose my focus and I can't pull out of my bad streak. I eventually end up losing the game or storming off. This doesn't happen to me in any other aspect of my life and I don't normally get this frustrated at anything. Any advice? <hr /></blockquote>

I watched this girl play pool the other night and it was a beauty to watch. Very nice stroke, shooting, shape etc. Then she shot this very difficult shot on the 8 and it hit dead in the pocket and bounced back out onto the table because those were just crappy pockets and you risk things bouncing out with a very hard hit, even a dead center hit. After that, she was so bummed that she started playing bad and lost to a much weaker player. I hated that for her because it was an absolutely beautiful shot on that 8, but I guess recognizing the table conditions and table limitations is part of the sport.

It just seems to me that when a person loses control of their emotions and loses that calm, somewhat dispassionate state, the concentration goes too and then it is all over for so many.

There is nothing worse than seeing a really great player play bad and lose because they could not hold onto their composure.

Laura