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silver2k
02-23-2004, 05:11 PM
I have a question about wood used for shafts.

I have two cues that I am comparing(I own both.)

One is a sneaky pete made by a local cuemaker(he is very nice and his work seems top noch thus far.) If I look at the bottom of his shaft I can see that the wood he used had many 'growth' rings, I count 18 total.

Next up is a jacoby that I picked up. If I count the growth rings on the bottom of the shaft, there are 5 total.

My viking(which i LOVE dearly) seems to be somewhere in the middle with 10 or 11.

Is the jacoby any good of a cue?

Here are some pics of it:
http://www.pitt.edu/~cah7/97_1.jpg
http://www.pitt.edu/~cah7/97_2.jpg

I picked it up for $150. It is brand new, never been chalked. The tip sucks on it. I am deciding whether or not I should get a predator shaft(I tried one and liked it) for the viking or for the Jacoby.

Should I just resell the Jacoby? How much do you think I could get for it?

Candyman
02-23-2004, 05:27 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote silver2k:</font><hr> I have a question about wood used for shafts.

I have two cues that I am comparing(I own both.)

One is a sneaky pete made by a local cuemaker(he is very nice and his work seems top noch thus far.) If I look at the bottom of his shaft I can see that the wood he used had many 'growth' rings, I count 18 total.

Next up is a jacoby that I picked up. If I count the growth rings on the bottom of the shaft, there are 5 total.

My viking(which i LOVE dearly) seems to be somewhere in the middle with 10 or 11.

Is the jacoby any good of a cue?

Here are some pics of it:
http://www.pitt.edu/~cah7/97_1.jpg
http://www.pitt.edu/~cah7/97_2.jpg

I picked it up for $150. It is brand new, never been chalked. The tip sucks on it. I am deciding whether or not I should get a predator shaft(I tried one and liked it) for the viking or for the Jacoby.

Should I just resell the Jacoby? How much do you think I could get for it? <hr /></blockquote>

I am no expert, but Dominiak makes cue and also sells cue stock. Here is their address and it explains cue wood grades.


http://www.dominiak.com/cuestock/grade.htm

tateuts
02-23-2004, 06:12 PM
I am not a cue maker but I have a lot of cues. As far as quality goes, the cellular density of the shaft and how straight grained they are seem to be more important than how many growth rings they have, and the two don't seem to have a big relationship with each other.

Somehow, experienced cuemakers can tell which shafts will produce that "pop" they are looking for. I have two Huebler custom shop cues, each has two shafts. These have the best quality shafts of any cue I've ever had, and the shafts weigh the same and play identical to each other, which is rare. I was thinking about getting another one made up, so I called Paul Huebler and asked him how much. He said $285. I said, why so much, you only charge $100 for your production cue shafts? He said "my custom shafts are special. I have to look through hundreds of shafts to find the right ones. I asked him how he knew when he found the right ones? He said "well, you have to know what you're doing".

I believe him because you can have two identical shafts and have a 25% weight difference between them. He can pick out the solid shafts that play well somehow.

Chris

Ralph S.
02-23-2004, 09:15 PM
I own a Jacoby, and have no complaints. Should you still want to unload the Jacoby, send me a pm. I will try and work something out with you.

Fred Agnir
02-24-2004, 07:49 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote silver2k:</font><hr>
Is the jacoby any good of a cue?<hr /></blockquote> Yes. Check out the February 2004 issue of InsidePool Magazine. I hear there's a writeup on Jacoby Cues.

Fred &lt;~~~ that's what they tell me

Wally_in_Cincy
02-24-2004, 08:03 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> Yes. Check out the February 2004 issue of InsidePool Magazine. I hear there's a writeup on Jacoby Cues.

Fred &lt;~~~ that's what they tell me

<hr /></blockquote>

Although I'm not "cue-obsessed" like some of the people here, I found that to be quite an interesting feature. I don't recall anything similar previously in the billiard mags. I'll assume it was your idea and offer you kudos on the concept and execution.

Wally~~looking forward to the next one....

P.S. ...BTW nice mug shot too /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

shoop1969
02-24-2004, 09:15 AM
Jim Buss, one of the best living cuemakers around today, offers some premium shafts that are made from stock that comes from the bottom of Lake Erie.

The wood comes from logs that have sank to the bottom of the lake over one hundred years ago when the logging industry was still cutting down the "old growth" forests. In the days before the forests of North America were cut heavily, the trees grew closer together and therefore grew slower, making the grain, i.e. growth rings, closer together. The temperature, mineral content, and oxygen levels of the lake preserve the wood in a pristine condition. Much of the old wood pulled from the lake is used in fine furniture and musical instruments.

The people I know who've gotten these shafts swear by them and are convinced that because of the dense growth rings that they hit truer and have less deflection.

Fred Agnir
02-24-2004, 09:16 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> Although I'm not "cue-obsessed" like some of the people here, I found that to be quite an interesting feature. I don't recall anything similar previously in the billiard mags. I'll assume it was your idea and offer you kudos on the concept and execution.

Wally~~looking forward to the next one....

P.S. ...BTW nice mug shot too /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif <hr /></blockquote>Thanks Wally. The column existed before I got involved. I think they had maybe two cuemakers done: Layani and Barry Szamboti.

Fred