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KGeeED
02-26-2004, 09:48 AM
A member on our pool team has a McDemott cue. He laid it on the table while racking the balls and it made a lopsided roll. The butt and shaft roll flat but when together it has this roll. The tip will raise about 1" off the table. Looking at the screw when rolling the butt it appears as if the screw is bent but the joint seems to join together with no gaps. If the screw is bent can it be replaced? He does not know how this happened. He said that he does not break with this cue which to me should not affect it and said nobody else uses it. What would cause the screw to bend? He uses a flat hinged cue case.

Big_Jon
02-26-2004, 10:43 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote KGeeED:</font><hr> A member on our pool team has a McDemott cue. He laid it on the table while racking the balls and it made a lopsided roll. The butt and shaft roll flat but when together it has this roll. The tip will raise about 1" off the table. Looking at the screw when rolling the butt it appears as if the screw is bent but the joint seems to join together with no gaps. If the screw is bent can it be replaced? He does not know how this happened. He said that he does not break with this cue which to me should not affect it and said nobody else uses it. What would cause the screw to bend? He uses a flat hinged cue case. <hr /></blockquote>

Yes, it can be replaced, the screw will have to be heated with a torch (or whatever) to heat up the glue (epoxy) and taken out carefully and a tap run back through the hole, to clean out the old glue, and another pin in it's place. Be sure to tell this guy, when he puts the money into repairing this problem, spend a little more for some quality joint protectors... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/ooo.gif

tateuts
02-26-2004, 11:03 AM
First I check each piece, the shaft and handle, to see if they are straight. I put the shaft on a flat counter, get down to eye level, and slowly turn it, keeping an eye on the gap between the shaft and the counter. The gap should stay the same size as you rotate it. Then I do the same thing with the butt. Most butts are slightly tapered the same way shafts are but some are just evenly tapered. What you look for is either the gap being the same, or lifting of either the joint or butt sleeve as you turn.

OK - assuming both parts are straight. Screw the cue together and sight down it like a gun barrel and slowly turn it. If the joint is out (which I suspect is the case) you will see a slight "crook" where the shaft is sitting on a different line than the handle. What I do is unscrew the joint a hair, and shim it with a piece of paper or two. Then I sight down it again and if the shims straightened it out, the chances are the joint collar got shifted and needs to be refaced. If that's all it is, this guy here can do it reasonably for you.

http://www.proficientbilliards.com/servicesframes.htm

I haven't had a cue with a bent joint screw. I think you can
see if a joint screw is off by rolling the handle on a flat surface and watching the screw turn - if it wobbles up and down, obviously it's bent. Joint screws are replaceable by a cue-maker.

McDermott has an excellent repair department as well.

Chris

BLACKHEART
02-26-2004, 02:13 PM
I get several of these repairs a year. It's a quick fix, if it's not bent too much. Your Q repairman can put the screw into the lathe chuck &amp; turn the lathe by hand, till he finds the highest point. Then by pressing down on the rear of the butt, the screw can be bent back, to where it was. It may take several tries, but you can get it almost perfect. Then with a small file, touch up the marks left by the chuck. It's much easier &amp; cheaper than removing the screw...JER

Big_Jon
02-26-2004, 03:46 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BLACKHEART:</font><hr> I get several of these repairs a year. It's a quick fix, if it's not bent too much. Your Q repairman can put the screw into the lathe chuck &amp; turn the lathe by hand, till he finds the highest point. Then by pressing down on the rear of the butt, the screw can be bent back, to where it was. It may take several tries, but you can get it almost perfect. Then with a small file, touch up the marks left by the chuck. It's much easier &amp; cheaper than removing the screw...JER <hr /></blockquote>

No offence to you jer, but i would rather take it out, and put a new pin in that i know is straight, and not risk damaging the cue worse that it already is. If the joint needs to be re-faced, then just about any local guy (with a lathe) could do it.

Thanks

Jon

BLACKHEART
02-26-2004, 11:11 PM
You're right Jon. The repair I suggested is a CHEAP,QUICK fix for those who don't want to spend the money, to do the removal &amp; replacement job...JER

KGeeED
02-27-2004, 09:01 AM
Thanks for all of the info. I am sure he will be happy to know that it is a repairable fix that will not cost more than the original price of his cue. It is a plain low end model

What would cause this to happen?