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View Full Version : How much practice is too much?



AnimalChin
03-04-2004, 12:51 PM
..or is there no such thing?

I've been playing pool for about two years, but it was mostly an excuse to go out and get drunk with my friends. In the last two months, I quit drinking and really fell in love with the game. I don't have my own table, and can't get one living in an apartment, so there is only so much I can play. I have four days off, so I try to squeeze as much pool in as I can.

Well, this week I logged 21 hours on the tables in four days. Some playing my friends, some playing strangers, most by myself doing drills. Today, my shoulder, knees, and brain are pretty much toast. Should I keep it up at this pace, or am I grooming myself for an early retirement?

-AnimalChin

Anonamus
03-04-2004, 01:08 PM
Practise for as long as it remains fun. Don't force it or you will burn yourself out. Don't worry about the physical pain, your body will adapt.

houstondan
03-04-2004, 01:57 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote AnimalChin:</font><hr> ..or is there no such thing?

Well, this week I logged 21 hours on the tables in four days. -AnimalChin <hr /></blockquote>

not counting the money and the fact that your muscles aren't used to it....that's really not all that much table time. most heavies that i know or know of have had long periods of 12 or more hours per day for long stretches. now, they don't usually maintain that pace for very many years but most can track their rise to those periods.

dan

Eric.
03-04-2004, 02:14 PM
Dan and Ed mentioned it; 5 hours a day isn't too much, there are people that do twice that. As long as you take care of your body i.e. stretch out so you don't pull a muscle, I don't think you have too much to worry about.

I think the quality of practice is more important than the quantity. I try to practice at the peak of my concentration level. Once my mind starts to drift or I find myself taking shots for granted, I stop. That could be after 1 hour or 10 hours.


Eric &gt;should be practicing

woody_968
03-04-2004, 02:32 PM
If you are keeping your focus and getting quality practice then its not too much. If you find yourself loosing focus, just winging at balls, and missing shots you no you should make then these are warning signs youve been at the table too long and may need a break. At times like these you can do more harm than good by ingraining bad habbits into your game.

SPetty
03-04-2004, 04:23 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Eric.:</font><hr> 5 hours a day isn't too much, there are people that do twice that.<hr /></blockquote>Of course, there are those of us with real jobs that prevent us from putting in as much time as we'd like. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Eric.
03-04-2004, 05:27 PM
Hey, I'm a working stiff too. That's why I'm lucky to make 2 balls in a row...


Eric

Barbara
03-04-2004, 07:06 PM
And let's not forget any other little thing that interests us... /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Here's to us! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Barbara

What do I know... I'm just some broad...

Barbara
03-04-2004, 07:26 PM
It depends on how you're practicing. Time is less important when quality comes into the picture.

If you're just banging balls around, that's not quality unless you have a plan on how you're banging the balls around. Not everyone can practice a "structured practice". It takes disclpine and committment.

But also realize that even if you do commit to a structured practice, your mind is going to want to take a break at some time. You can only focus for so long. This is where you can also train yourself how to focus, how long you want to focus, and how you want to take your break and how you regain focus back onto the table with the task at hand.

There are many things involved in practicing. And they're each very exciting to learn.

Good luck in your discoveries!

Barbara

But what do I know... I'm just some broad...

AnimalChin
03-04-2004, 08:28 PM
Wow, thanks for all the feedback, everybody. Here is roughly what I've been doing.

I usually start with a simple drill where I scatter three balls randomly and just practice positioning the cue ball, setting back up if I make the ball but blow the position. I experiment a lot with this, since I'm still learning. Always setting the shot back up if it suprises me.

Then I break a rack of 8-Ball, pocket all the stripes except the nine, then shoot the rest of the rack like a game of nine. Again, setting shots back up if I miss or blow my position badly (though I'm not as picky as I am in the three ball drill). I also do other drills to break this up, like setting balls up on the rails, freezing balls together, setting up straightforward kicks, etc, but honestly these get old fast.

I try to take short breaks every hour to get a soda and smoke a cig, and a longer break in the middle and stretch, clean my cue, and burnish the tip.

I also play friends of mine twice a week. One is way better than me, and we play 14:1 to 50. The other is way worse than me, so I play her left handed 8 and 9 ball.

Didn't mean to drone on so long, but thats pretty much what I'm doing. Thanks again all.

-Animal Chin

houstondan
03-04-2004, 09:26 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote AnimalChin:</font><hr> Wow, thanks for all the feedback, everybody. Here is roughly what I've been doing.

I usually start with a simple drill........Didn't mean to drone on so long, but thats pretty much what I'm doing. Thanks again all.

-Animal Chin <hr /></blockquote>

you keep doin what yer doin and i gurantee you'll improve. sounds like a pretty good regimin.

add in some small money games with different players if you're ready.

dan

SRpool
03-05-2004, 08:17 AM
I agree with everyone else, time doesn't matter as much as quality. And your muscles will adjust to walking around and bending so much. I think everyone goes through that. I know I do if I haven't played for long periods of time I get very sore when I finally do play for a long period of time. As for your drills, you seem to be very disciplined. You deserve to succeed just for being so disciplined.

Good luck with everything.
Sarah

Chris Cass
03-05-2004, 09:14 AM
I doubt it. I once took my 2 week vacation from work. I shot 92 hrs in that period. Yes, drilled 80 hrs alone. I'll tell you this though. The drills I did brought me up 2 balls. You might not see an improvement right away but I was told, I was making too many shots while I played a very good player in my hometown.

I only practice the drills that I needed to practice. Knowing the area where your weak in helps. Staying focused is key to any good practice regiment. I also took a ten minute break every hr. That's a must IMO. If you don't stay focused and have a written goal on paper or atleast in your mind. You'll be practicing for nothing. Have a goal, write it down, keep a record and list results. Be honest with yourself, and have a direction. Without this, your spinning your wheels. Hard work will pay off for those who stay honest with themselves. This game is knowing yourself better than anyone else. Strickly my opinion.

Regards,

C.C.~~ /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Wally_in_Cincy
03-05-2004, 09:30 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chris Cass:</font><hr> ... Have a goal, write it down, keep a record and list results....<hr /></blockquote>

And the perfect book for this is:

Black Belt Billiards (http://members.aol.com/blkbeltbilliards/)

SRpool
03-05-2004, 05:08 PM
I forgot to mention that if you are into doing drills you should check out the Billiards Workbook. It feels like there are a million drills to do (there might be?!?!) It was very helpful to me while I was getting used to my new cue.

Just an idea.
Sarah