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Regulator
03-08-2004, 12:54 AM
Hi,

I've been reading through a lot of posts, and still have a question - maybe 5 or 6 - but this one is pressing.

The dealer I'm thinking of buying a table from has a cheap starter package that I plan on upgrading. I'm going to get better balls (Aramith Pro or Premium), but what about the cues ??

He includes 4 1-piece cues. He suggests I upgrade to Dufferin High Run 1-piece cues ($50 each, less $30 credit) because they're "better" and have a much better tip. The tip looks better, but what do I know.

I guess I could spend even more, but I'd like to have some money left over for beer. Already budgeted for Simonis or else you guys would come over and break my cues over my head. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Suggestions on what cues to buy for my house ??

(I haven't played much in years, so I'm going to wait on a high-end cue for myself.)

Thanks,

hadenball
03-08-2004, 01:02 AM
Dufferins are excellent and if you can get them for 20.00 I say go for it. You can also Meullers at www.poolndarts.com. (http://www.poolndarts.com.) They have valley's and others pretty reasonable, the more you buy the better the price.

Popcorn
03-08-2004, 01:39 AM
$50.00 is too much for the one piece cues. I assume the credit of $30.00 is for the cues you were getting.

1Time
03-08-2004, 02:54 AM
If the table will be smaller than regulation, I wouldn't pay more than $100 for a set of 4 house cues. I wouldn't be surprised if a cheap set of house cues could be found for under $50. Two 18 ouncers and two 19 ouncers would do it.

$50 each for one piece Dufferins is retail pricing, and these are good cues. I'd only consider them if your table will be regulation size. Reason: the better taper of the shaft and better tip could be noticably more useful on a regulation table than on a smaller one. I wouldn't recommend getting a 4' X 8' table.

Rich R.
03-08-2004, 04:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote hadenball:</font><hr> Dufferins are excellent and if you can get them for 20.00 I say go for it. You can also Meullers at www.poolndarts.com. (http://www.poolndarts.com.) They have valley's and others pretty reasonable, the more you buy the better the price. <hr /></blockquote>
Muellers also has some two piece cues, page 71 of the catalog, that are inexpensive and play pretty well. They sell for $49.95 each, but if you are buying 3-11, the cost goes down to $39.95 each.
IMHO, an excellent value.

Troy
03-08-2004, 08:57 AM
Try asking your local Pool Room owner if he'll sell you 4 of his house Dufferins. You should be able to get them for about $20 each MAX...

Troy

1Time
03-08-2004, 09:04 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Troy:</font><hr> Try asking your local Pool Room owner if he'll sell you 4 of his house Dufferins. You should be able to get them for about $20 each MAX...
<hr /></blockquote>

That would be an excellent buy; it pays to shop around.

Regulator
03-08-2004, 12:05 PM
Thanks for the replies. I am planning on an 8' table. I probably have the room for a 9' (16'-8" x 19'), but since most everyone around here has 7 or 8 at home and the bars are 7 or 8, I'm thinking that having an 8' at home is better.

I fully admit I don't have a clue, or a cue. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Wally_in_Cincy
03-08-2004, 12:07 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Regulator:</font><hr> ...I probably have the room for a 9' (16'-8" x 19')...<hr /></blockquote>

That's going to be cutting it very close. IMO better to get an 8' and have plenty of stroke room.

tateuts
03-08-2004, 12:14 PM
If you're only talking about $80 more to get good Dufferins over some junk chinese cues that are going to be thrown out in two years, I would do it, but it does sound like a money making gimmick to me. If he is already including basic Dufferin's in the package, then I wouldn't.

My table came with six Dufferin standard one piece cues 12 years ago. All of them are dead straight and are excellent house cues. Bear in mind that house cues will get banged up, etc.

By the way, these Dufferins squirt about as much as the modern high-tech Predator - go figure.

Chris

1Time
03-09-2004, 04:17 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Regulator:</font><hr> I am planning on an 8' table. I probably have the room for a 9' (16'-8" x 19'), but since most everyone around here has 7 or 8 at home and the bars are 7 or 8, I'm thinking that having an 8' at home is better.<hr /></blockquote>

I grew up playing on an 8' table. The only good thing I remember about it was a 4' x 8' sheet of plywood fit over it nicely as a ping pong table. A 7' table would be better for family and friends to play on. There's not as much green which makes it easier to make shots and kids can reach the shots easier.

Wally_in_Cincy
03-09-2004, 07:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr>.... A 7' table would be better for family and friends to play on. There's not as much green which makes it easier to make shots and kids can reach the shots easier. <hr /></blockquote>

If Regulator wants to be a better player he should get the biggest table that is practical. Therefore I must disagree with your statement above.

Hell the kids can't make balls anyway so what's the difference? When those kids get a little older they may want to get serious about the game. It would better for them to learn on an 8'

Wally~~would not choose a table just to accomodate ballpushers

Iowashark
03-09-2004, 08:14 AM
I'm going to have to agree with Wally here.

The only way putting a 9 footer in a room that's not quite big enough for it will make you any better is if you plan on taking your short cue to the pool hall when you go.

Ken
03-09-2004, 04:03 PM
Why would you need a short cue in a room that's 19 feet long? I don't think you could hit the wall on a backstroke if you tried.

Brunswick recommends 18 feet minimum. Now that is tight.

Iowashark
03-09-2004, 04:12 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ken:</font><hr> Why would you need a short cue in a room that's 19 feet long? I don't think you could hit the wall on a backstroke if you tried.

Brunswick recommends 18 feet minimum. Now that is tight. <hr /></blockquote>

Beats me, I don't have a 19 foot room, or a 9 foot table, or know the specs one would need for a 9 footer to fit comfortably. I was under the assumption from previous posts in this thread that it wouldn't be enough room. If I was mistaken I apologize.

Wally_in_Cincy
03-10-2004, 07:30 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ken:</font><hr> Why would you need a short cue in a room that's 19 feet long? I don't think you could hit the wall on a backstroke if you tried.

Brunswick recommends 18 feet minimum. Now that is tight. <hr /></blockquote>

Brunswick is nuts.

If a 9' table is 104" cushion nose to cushion nose and 19'= 228"

then...

228-104 = 124

124 / 2 = 62"

With a 58" cue you would have 4" of stroke length available. Is that enough? It's a judgement call I guess.

Where the heck is Fred? /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

ras314
03-10-2004, 08:24 AM
<hr /></blockquote>

Brunswick is nuts.

If a 9' table is 104" cushion nose to cushion nose and 19'= 228"

then...

228-104 = 124

124 / 2 = 62"

With a 58" cue you would have 4" of stroke length available. Is that enough? It's a judgement call I guess.

Where the heck is Fred? /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif <hr /></blockquote>
I haven't measured any 9 ft tables but Diamond shows theirs as 50 by 100 in. So would wind up with 5" of stroke avaliable?

Wally_in_Cincy
03-10-2004, 08:30 AM
Hmmmmm.....

If a 9' table is 100" cushion nose to cushion nose and 19'= 228"

then...

228-100 = 128

128 / 2 = 64"

With a 58" cue you would have 6" of stroke length available.

That would be enough I think. The rails are not wider than that.

My old 8' Brunswick is 46 x 92 and I made my assumptions from that. Oh well.

ras314
03-10-2004, 12:34 PM
Some inside dimensions from the Mueller catalog:

7 ft 38" X 78" home table
7 ft 40" X 80" coin-op
8 ft 44" X 88" standard
8 ft 46" X 92" oversize
9 ft 50" X 100" standard

Never have figured out what "regulation" size was suposed to mean. Nor who or what is the regulation agency. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Regulator
03-11-2004, 05:05 PM
Hi,

Thanks for the replies. I think I had a brain freeze that your replies helped me think through.

My room is 16-8 x 19, but one end of the 16-8 only has 3 foot wing walls on each side, so the opening going all the way to the front door 9 feet away is 10-8 wide.

If I do the math for a 9' table - leave 69" from the back wall to the edge of the rail, 100" of table, center the table in the room, use A squared plus B squared equals C squared, the distance from the edge of the pocket diagonally to the edge of the wing wall is 70". Seems like a 9' table should fit with lots of cue space.

Maybe I'll develop a "Happy Gilmore" break shot - run from the front door. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Hhhmmm, I wasn't thinking of getting a 9'.

1Time
03-11-2004, 11:31 PM
You will absolutely love having a 9' table, and it will be the envy of the neighbors for sure. You'll also get better, faster by playing on a "regulation" table.

1Time
03-12-2004, 08:39 AM
Here's (http://jamesglewis.com/house/billiardtable.php) a handy room size chart for help with choosing the right table for your room size.

Frank_Glenn
03-12-2004, 08:51 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr> Here's (http://jamesglewis.com/house/billiardtable.php) a handy room size chart for help with choosing the right table for your room size. <hr /></blockquote>

This looks like something made up by someone wanting to sell pool tables. Anything less than a 57" cue is unaccetable for me. With that being said, just add 10 feet to the size of the table and you have the minimum room size (4.5X9 = 14.5X19, 3X7 = 13X17, etc). Of course if you want to play with a 36" cue, well, go ahead, just don't expect your friends to come over and like it. YMMV

1Time
03-12-2004, 10:24 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr> Here's (http://jamesglewis.com/house/billiardtable.php) a handy room size chart for help with choosing the right table for your room size. <hr /></blockquote>
For those of us who don't use less than a regulation length cue, 57", you may find the recommended minumum room dimentions by looking under the 57" or 60" columns of the chart shown in the above link.

Fred Agnir
03-13-2004, 05:16 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr> Here's (http://jamesglewis.com/house/billiardtable.php) a handy room size chart for help with choosing the right table for your room size. <hr /></blockquote>
For those of us who don't use less than a regulation length cue, 57", you may find the recommended minumum room dimentions by looking under the 57" or 60" columns of the chart shown in the above link. <hr /></blockquote>Many of us will frown upon these types of room size listings. They're bogus and misleading. They show a room big enough to physically place the stick, but not to actually stroke it once the cueball ends up near the rail.

The Pool &amp; Billiard FAQ contains size requirements if you actually want to play the whole game.

Here's what the FAQ says:

http://www.faqs.org/faqs/sports/billiards/faq/
----------------------------------------
10. ** How much room do I need for a table?

The minimum space for a table is the playing area plus the length of a
cue (58") plus about 6 inches for the back swing, more for comfort, on
each side. This gives the table:


8' table
playing area - 44" x 88"
room size - 14'4" x 18'
metric - 4.4m x 5.5m


9' table
playing area - 50" x 100"
room size - 14'10" x19'
metric - 4.5m x 5.8m



"Seven foot" tables vary in size. Work down from the 8' dimensions. (Fred's note: most common 7' bar tables are 40" x 80" playing area while 7' home tables are usually 38" x 76". Measure.)

If your room does not meet these minimum size requirements, many
billiard retailers will suggest that you can still put a table in, and
use short cues (52", or 48"). Many people have found they are unhappy
having to resort to shorter cues, and should have either gotten a
smaller table, or no table at all. Others, of course, take the
opposite view -- they are delighted to have any table.

In the end, only you will know whether you are happy with the room
dimensions and need for short cues. Before you spend $2000 for a table
that will cause you to smash the walls in frustration, try this:
(1) Find an indulgent pool hall when it's not busy. (2) Measure your
space (at home) carefully, including the distance from the table to all
walls that require a special cue (3) Go to the pool hall with a piece
or pieces of plywood or some such, and a short cue, and set up the
"walls" to replicate where the walls would be in your house. Play for
several hours, using the short cue when needed.
------------------------

Fred

1Time
03-13-2004, 07:09 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr>Many of us will frown upon these types of room size listings. <hr /></blockquote>

It's good to know the the correct minimum room size recommendations. The dimensions given in the link I posted earlier are obviously bogus and misleading. I never thought to add the distance one uses to stroke the cue. Count me as another who frowns on such listings. Thanks Fred.

jamesglewisf
03-16-2004, 02:47 PM
[ QUOTE ]
This looks like something made up by someone wanting to sell pool tables.<hr /></blockquote>[ QUOTE ]
Many of us will frown upon these types of room size listings. They're bogus and misleading.<hr /></blockquote>[ QUOTE ]
The dimensions given in the link I posted earlier are obviously bogus and misleading. I never thought to add the distance one uses to stroke the cue. Count me as another who frowns on such listings. Thanks Fred. <hr /></blockquote>

You guys sure sound harsh. My web site doesn't sell anything. I just described the building of my home.

I have updated the page based upon your recommendations to include the back swing space. http://www.jamesglewis.com/house/billiardtable.php