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View Full Version : Replacing a standard joint with a uni-lock



stickman
03-15-2004, 11:37 PM
I have the instructions and diagrams for installing the uni-lock pin and insert. What instructions can you give me for removing the existing pin and insert? /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Frank_Glenn
03-16-2004, 01:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote stickman:</font><hr> I have the instructions and diagrams for installing the uni-lock pin and insert. What instructions can you give me for removing the existing pin and insert? /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif <hr /></blockquote>

1. gather up the parts and the cue
2. give them to a qualified cue repair person
3. wait until he is done and pay him

This is how I would do it.

stickman
03-16-2004, 08:31 AM
That doesn't sound like any fun. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I'm buying some cheap used cues to play with. I'm not about to ruin a customers cue. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Fred Agnir
03-16-2004, 08:58 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote stickman:</font><hr> That doesn't sound like any fun. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I'm buying some cheap used cues to play with. I'm not about to ruin a customers cue. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif <hr /></blockquote>Thomas Wayne's Method on Joint Pin Removal (http://groups.google.com/groups?selm=36a73d59.13204246%40nntp.alaska.net&amp;oe =UTF-8&amp;output=gplain)

De Nada.

Fred

stickman
03-16-2004, 09:19 AM
Thanks, Fred. It sounds like a big task. I was sure that heat was involved, but couldn't figure out how it could be done without damaging other components. If you want a uni-lock joint, I think it would be best to have it built that way. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fred Agnir
03-16-2004, 09:28 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote stickman:</font><hr> Thanks, Fred. It sounds like a big task. I was sure that heat was involved, but couldn't figure out how it could be done without damaging other components. If you want a uni-lock joint, I think it would be best to have it built that way. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote> I had someone remove an epoxied-in weight bolt from one of my cues. He sent me the weight bolt after the job was done. It looked like he simply drilled a hole in it (repeatedly?) until the heat moved the epoxy enough for him to unscrew it.

Fred

stickman
03-16-2004, 09:56 AM
I removed part of a joint collar once. It was two pieces with a decorative ring between them. The epoxy had become loose and the ring was getting off center. I put the shaft in the lathe, and with a welding glove, I held the joint with the shaft spinning and was able to remove the piece and epoxy it again. The heat did the trick. It was my own cue. The cue was custom built for me about 6 years ago. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Popcorn
03-16-2004, 11:26 AM
I just read that whole piece and he is nuts. It does not take a million degrees to loosen epoxy. A little heat and it will come loose without damaging anything. Take a screw and heat the end and see how fast the other end gets hot. I just use a candle to heat the screw and it always comes out with no problem. Wood is an insulator not a conductor, It does not act like a heat sink when heating the screw. It keeps the heat in and helps the screw get hot with the least amount of heat needed. I have gotten out butt screws that were epoxied in down inside the cue, just using the tip of a soldering iron on the screw.

BLACKHEART
03-16-2004, 12:27 PM
POPCORN, you are right on, once again. I've used the soldering iron trick, quit a few times. And, less heat is needed, than you might think, to remove a glued in screw...JER.

Rod
03-16-2004, 12:45 PM
Like you said Popcorn, it does not take a lot of heat to make epoxy melt and crumble. Certainly not enough to burn the wood. I've never replaced a joint pin but have loosened many parts held together with epoxy with little heat. It sounds like someone who uses a big welding torch to solder. It takes little heat to make lead/tin solder melt.

Rod

stickman
03-16-2004, 01:01 PM
I thought of using a soldering iron, but without any experience I wasn't sure. That doesn't sound so drastic, and I might to try. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Cueless Joey
03-16-2004, 01:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> I just read that whole piece and he is nuts. It does not take a million degrees to loosen epoxy. A little heat and it will come loose without damaging anything. Take a screw and heat the end and see how fast the other end gets hot. I just use a candle to heat the screw and it always comes out with no problem. Wood is an insulator not a conductor, It does not act like a heat sink when heating the screw. It keeps the heat in and helps the screw get hot with the least amount of heat needed. I have gotten out butt screws that were epoxied in down inside the cue, just using the tip of a soldering iron on the screw. <hr /></blockquote>
That depends on the epoxy. If you use the quick drying ones, they usually melt around 140 degrees. Slow setting 24 HR ones usually melt around 180.
Of course, some hacks still use yellow glue on pins and collars.

Cueless Joey
03-16-2004, 01:20 PM
Use disposable cig lighter. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Cueless Joey
03-16-2004, 01:21 PM
Stick, does your lathe have a thread gear?
You might have to plug the hole up and thread a dowel there with 18 tpi.

Troy
03-16-2004, 02:49 PM
NO, NO, NO -- Do NOT use FLAME !!!
A soldering iron should do the trick quite nicely.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cueless Joey:</font><hr> Use disposable cig lighter. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote>

stickman
03-16-2004, 02:53 PM
Yeah, but I haven't tried it yet. I have some hardwood dowel. I've been intending to try it.

Jim

Cueless Joey
03-16-2004, 02:56 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Troy:</font><hr> NO, NO, NO -- Do NOT use FLAME !!!
A soldering iron should do the trick quite nicely.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cueless Joey:</font><hr> Use disposable cig lighter. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote> <hr /></blockquote>
Propane blow torch is used all the time. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
Used properly, it works fine.
Of course, try spinning the butt first and using leather to heat up the pin. Maybe, the pin is yellow glued or epoxied with a quick drying epoxy.

Cueless Joey
03-16-2004, 03:02 PM
And how are u going to thread internally, might I ask?

Popcorn
03-16-2004, 03:12 PM
I had a guy with an old Abe Rich cue that had a broken butt cap held in with a bolt. Nothing would loosen that bolt. We turned the rest of the butt cap away so we could get to the bolt and had about a half inch sticking out. Heat, vise grips, nothing would get it to come loose. I finally had to drill it out completely. I don't know what kind of glue that was but it was really strong. Most of the time the screw will let go even if you don't heat them unless they have a key way or flat spot cut in them. I like to, after heating the screw, clamp the screw in the lathe chuck with in the back gear so it won't turn and holding the cue turning it out. They almost always come out pretty easy.