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View Full Version : Cuemaking: procedure for fitting shaft to butt?



Leviathan
03-17-2004, 08:44 AM
Some custom cuemakers get a beautiful fit of shaft to butt. Others don't handle this so well--for example, I've got a cue that has a cokebottle contour in the joint area. Hits nice but looks lousy. Well, it's clear that cuemakers who do this work badly don't do the final turning and sanding of the joint area with the shaft assembled to the butt. My question is this: do the makers whose cues have great fit and a smooth contour in the joint area do the final turning of that area with the shaft assembled to the butt, or do they get their results by other methods?

Thanks for any info,

AS

BLACKHEART
03-17-2004, 10:26 AM
Making a new shaft for an old Q can be very frustrating. If the joint screw(I hate the term "pin"),is not perfectly centered, it requires a lot of hand sanding & fitting on the shaft. If you are making a Q from scratch the 2 pieces can be joined & sanded together with smooth results. What brands of Qs have you noticed this problem in?...JER

Popcorn
03-17-2004, 10:31 AM
quote

"Well, it's clear that cue makers who do this work badly don't do the final turning and sanding of the joint area with the shaft assembled to the butt. My question is this: do the makers whose cues have great fit and a smooth contour in the joint area do the final turning of the joint area with the shaft assembled to the butt, or do they get their results by other methods?"

Other methods, if you sanded the shaft and butt together, what would you do to fit a second or third shaft and no two joints would be the same size except by chance. One good method is to use a perfectly matched set of mandrels. Even though made separately, the shaft and the butt will be a perfect blend every time. Also, except for matching a joint design, you will not need to have the butt to make a new shaft fit perfectly. There are other methods but I think the mandrel method works very well, with consistent precision.

Leviathan
03-17-2004, 10:55 AM
Thanks, Popcorn. I've never worked with a lathe, so I've wondered how one deals with the "fitting-a-second-shaft" problem.

AS

Cueless Joey
03-17-2004, 10:57 AM
One of those tricks of the trades.
There is a proper way of sanding without a jig to match the butts and shafts perfectly.
But, the easiest way to do it is with a jig with a carbide ring. The jig holds the pin and the carbide ring has a slight angle on it and it's around .840 at the tip.
You just sand the shaft with that.
A jig for the butt has the threaded hole on it. You sand with that one too.
There are still cuemakers out there who make cues for thousands of dollars that do not mate their cues perfectly.

Leviathan
03-17-2004, 11:06 AM
Thanks, Joey. Interesting!--AS

Cueless Joey
03-17-2004, 11:12 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Leviathan:</font><hr> Thanks, Joey. Interesting!--AS <hr /></blockquote>
It can be done without a jig too.
Superb master cueamaker Eddie Prewitt still does it without a jig. He thinks doing it with a jig is lazy.
I won't argue with Eddie. He is a cuemaking God to me. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif When your no points cue sell for over a grand, you must be doing something right.
Btw, the divot you mentioned is created when the maker sands the two joints with his hand. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif It doesn't take a genius to figure out there is no way you can apply pressure here evenly. He'd be lucky if the collars are concentric.
If he did that with ivory, he'd have to epoxy some flat areas of the joint. /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

Popcorn
03-17-2004, 11:53 AM
Quote

"He thinks doing it with a jig is lazy."

I don't think he really means that, he is just comfortable with the way he works. Working with jigs is the secrete of wood working. It would be awful hard to build a matched set of chairs without using jigs or templates. It is not being lazy, it produces consistency and quality. As far as cues go, the more precision you do the work the easier it is. You don't have to be trouble shooting and correcting your mistakes. Points are always perfect, shafts always fit, every part of the cue should be made precision, even the parts you can't see. I watch that show American Chopper and it makes my skin crawl. Nothing ever fits right, everything is eyeballed. I have worked with guys like that and it is no wonder they are always angry, they work from crisis to crisis, they spend more time fixing mistakes then working, and the final outcome is always in doubt.

Cueless Joey
03-17-2004, 12:34 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> Quote

"He thinks doing it with a jig is lazy."

I don't think he really means that, he is just comfortable with the way he works. Working with jigs is the secrete of wood working. It would be awful hard to build a matched set of chairs without using jigs or templates. It is not being lazy, it produces consistency and quality. As far as cues go, the more precision you do the work the easier it is. You don't have to be trouble shooting and correcting your mistakes. Points are always perfect, shafts always fit, every part of the cue should be made precision, even the parts you can't see. I watch that show American Chopper and it makes my skin crawl. Nothing ever fits right, everything is eyeballed. I have worked with guys like that and it is no wonder they are always angry, they work from crises to crisis, they spend more time fixing mistakes then working, and the final outcome is always in doubt. <hr /></blockquote>
LOL Pop. Yeah, those choppers buy most of their parts too.
Kinda like custom cuemakers who buy Prather blanks and assemble them then sign their names on them. Shameless. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
I've seen it done without the jig. I ain't doing it myself.
Not when I can make jigs out of canvas phenolic sleeved with a carbide ring. /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

mworkman
03-17-2004, 02:35 PM
I just ordered a new shaft for my Pechauer and didn't even have to send in the Butt. I will let you know if it is perfectly straight like the original.

Popcorn
03-17-2004, 02:43 PM
I would almost bet you it will fit perfect. The only problem you have sometimes is when you have to match a one of a kind joint collar. It is best to have the butt next to you when you do it even though you made the original. If it is not perfect, color, (same kind of wood can look different from one piece to the next), or sizing of the parts, it is amazing how the eye can pick it up.