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silver2k
03-28-2004, 01:26 PM
I am learning the game one pocket. My friend and I play it once or twice a week. I understand the rules completely, however as far as strategy is concerned, I don't know much.

I know how to bank, and how to play safeties in regular pool, I just don't know any of the intricacies of one pocket. Nobody at my regular pool room plays this game...all of the local good people are obsessed with 9-ball. I really would like to learn a lot of the important shots and what not, but can't really find anywhere to do so. I am not about to spend a lot of money for the book winning one pocket.

Does anyone have any internet sites that explain how to play it, strategies, shots, etc.?

Troy
03-28-2004, 02:54 PM
1. Get Jack Koehler's "Upscalr One Pocket" book. You should be able to get it thru Amazon for about $15.00.
2. Check Accu-Stats website http://www.accu-stats.com/ for tapes or DVD's on One Pocket.
3. Ask around your pool room. There just might be a 1-Pocket player willing to give you lessons....... for a "fee"... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Troy

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote silver2k:</font><hr> I am learning the game one pocket. My friend and I play it once or twice a week. I understand the rules completely, however as far as strategy is concerned, I don't know much.

I know how to bank, and how to play safeties in regular pool, I just don't know any of the intricacies of one pocket. Nobody at my regular pool room plays this game...all of the local good people are obsessed with 9-ball. I really would like to learn a lot of the important shots and what not, but can't really find anywhere to do so. I am not about to spend a lot of money for the book winning one pocket.

Does anyone have any internet sites that explain how to play it, strategies, shots, etc.? <hr /></blockquote>

NH_Steve
03-28-2004, 06:19 PM
There are four books that could help, if you are a book person:

Eddie Robin's Winning One-Pocket &amp; Shots, Moves, Strategy
Jack Kohler's Upscale one Pocket
and one more that you might even already have on your book shelf if you've been studying pool for a long time:
George Fels' Mastering Pool, which has a nice section on learning the game.

The time honored way to learn is to find a knowledgeable player -- especially an older one, who may not be able to execute so well anymore, but who enjoys passing along his knowledge.

Accu-Stat's Video Productions has many many One Pocket tapes and the commentary will definitely help you understand the thinking involved in the game. Accu-Stats also carries two instructional videos that are introductory -- one by Bill Incardona and the other by Allen Hopkins.

The most basic strategy concept is to get balls near your own pocket (ultimately into of course!), and at the same time make it difficult for your opponent to remove them (generally by leaving the cue ball behind blocking balls). The best of this sort of maneuver puts your opponent in a 'trap' which could lead directly to you having a good shot when you get back to the table!

If you don't have a shot to your own pocket to score a ball, try to improve the lie of the balls that remain on the table to favor you -- by removing balls from your opponent's side and moving them to your own.

If you've got a regular opponent, you're already doing one thing right! Have fun, One Pocket offers a lifetime of challenge and entertainment.

silver2k
03-29-2004, 04:00 PM
I go to college in Pittsburgh. I asked around, and it turns out Jerry Slivka plays a lot at a pool hall around here....I just need to go watch him...

Anyone have any info on him? From what I hear he shoots a really good game /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif.

Mike H
03-29-2004, 11:03 PM
Jerry plays jam-up one pocket. Finished 3rd in the US Open One Pocket in 1996. He's a very aggressive type of one-pocket player, but you could definitely learn a lot by watching him.

Chris Cass
05-17-2004, 08:16 AM
Hi Silver 2k,

Do you know how to use the Wei table? First lets talk about the break. I break from the left side of the table. This indicates my pocket will be the right corner. The ideal break for me is to have the cb end up on the left rail after the break and frozen. In between diamonds two and three. Two, is better as three would leave some an easy way out.

The idea is to get the balls on your side of the table and leave your opponent no shot at his pocket.

Don't one rail kick a shot at your pocket if the shot is further than one diamond away from your opponents pocket. It's a sell out shot most of the time.

Try to get a ball hanging near your pocket and double face your opponent. Or, rather make them look at a combonation to your hole.

If your shot is clear try to repeat this getting another ball near your pocket. Unless you can make the ball and get another shot. This way, most of the traffic is on or near your pocket.

If your opponent has a ball hanging in his hole with a chance to get the ball out? Then, just make the ball for him and stop the cb. It's better to not be cheap and try saving it by knocking it out. It'll burn you and you'll end up giving him more than the one shot. So, unless it's the last ball and your not giving up the game. Don't be cheap and make it.

Don't get nervous when your opponent has everything near his hole. Remember, placing the cb in the right place means no shot and will buy you time to get them out of the way.

Learning force follow is key in many tough shots and will prove valuable when playing safe. High ball in general is neccessary in this game to become good. Going in increaments of 1, 2 and 3" are very important.

If a player gets made and slaps his pants when he misses leaving you a noticable shot. Be sure and check it out. It could very well be a trap and he wants you to play it.

If your up a couple balls it's wise to drive the rack at the top of the table on your side. Rather than let him pick away at them.

More important, learn the lag stroke. The only way to play this game is knowing table speed. Get the balls to barely drop in your pocket. If your shooting a bank you don't want to miss and leave your opponent a cross corner bank.

Learn how to jump a ball off the table with the cb also. This will be a foul and require the ball to be spotted along with one penalty ball. key, in the last ball shot. If your opponet has a ball in his jaws. You'd want to make it and scratch or fly off the table with the cb while making his. He doesn't get this ball and has a tough shot behind the headstring.

Geez, there's so many things. Get the Koeller book. Haven't read it myself but I know Jack knows this game hands down.

Regards,

C.C.

PQQLK9
05-17-2004, 09:02 AM
Thats good advice Chris. I was pleasantly surprised to find Jack Koehler's "Upscale One Pocket" in Vegas.
Maybe you can give me some lessons at the Open this year /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif.

Popcorn
05-17-2004, 09:55 AM
There is a lot to the game. You can learn a lot by just watching, but it is important to know why a player did what he did. The reason I say this, is because players don't play the same game. You won't play the same game I play and I won't play the same game Grady plays, but we will all play base on the same principles. On the surface the game appears to be mostly defense, this is not at all true. Just because you did not shoot at your pocket, does not mean you did make an offensive shot. Here are some key things that all levels of players need to do know.

Always before you shoot try to imagine how the balls will be after the shot, what will you leave your opponent.
Learn to break properly
Learn to get balls away from you opponents pocket. (Taking balls out)
Never leave free banks, "Ever". (Banks that can be hit no matter how difficult, without any jeopardy)
Always know the score of the game.

Early in the game, look around for dead balls, to both of the pockets.

The risk and reward rule is always in effect. You don't risk the game to get one ball.

When you get balls near your hole, try to protect them.

Practice cross over banks that are near the bottom rail. (In the end on a game with the players needing 1 or 2 balls. when a player puts a ball to their hole, this is the most common shot that may be left. You HAVE to be good at these.

Spend a little time of every practice session, practicing banks to the two corner pockets.

Practice running balls into one pocket. ( this is also kind of fun and will help your game in general).

After you play, try replaying things that came up and see if there was something better you could have done. This can be fun and also gives the people on the side lines a chance to tell you everything you did wrong, they always enjoy that.

There is a lot more but this is some general stuff that applies to players of all skill levels.
You will probably get a lot of good advice here on this question.

Frank_Glenn
05-17-2004, 10:06 AM
Pay attention in the pool hall. I found a guy that was a very good player at one time who is older now and on a fixed income. I used to play with him for time. He got to play free, and I got to ask questions. He would stop me when I was going to do something "bad" and explain why not to do it. He showed me lots of shots. This was very cheap lessons ($3/hr). I also used to play 3 or 4 hours a day at work when I worked for Quick-Clean. David, the owner is a very good one pocket player and taught me lots. I have found that since I do not play so much one pocket now, a lot of the "shots" I used to make are not so easy now. I am referring to 3, 4, &amp; 5 rail shots. To be really good at one pocket, my other games suffered because it is a different mind set. YMMV, but it messed up my stroke for other games. The best way to learn is to play with better players and pay attention.