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Bassn7
04-02-2004, 02:57 PM
1) Both the bottom of the tip and the top of the ferrule need to be sanded rough. 60 grit works great.
2) I have a small piece of 2x4 on a hindge that swings up for the shaft to sit under while the tip is being pressed onto the ferrule. I also add 10 lb. weight to the top of the 2x4 while the super glue is drying. 2 hours before removing and then letting the shaft sit over night before trimming.
3) None come off and I have a hard time replacing my own tips. They are on there like they're part of the ferrule.

(Hope the 2x4 image makes sense.)

Barbara
04-02-2004, 04:33 PM
What 2x4 image??

Here's my tip replacement stuff:

1. Collect cue case and pack into car.

2. Drive to My Cueman's house.

3. Quietly watch (read: take in the "new stuffs" in his workshop) while he grinds off the last of the old tips and glues new ones onto my shafts.

4. Sit and talk for an hour or so while the glue sets up.

Works for me. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Barbara~~~road trip!!!

Popcorn
04-02-2004, 04:51 PM
Quote
"Sit and talk for an hour or so while the glue sets up."

You mean waste an hour of his time, (Worth about $60.00 or so) as he is trying to work.

I know one cue maker who has all but lost his business, because his shop has turned into nothing but a hangout. They just can't take a hint, actually, he is too polite to give them one. They even mess with his equipment. The ones he helped out, that wanted to learn a little about cue repair, repaid him by going to the pool rooms around and trying to steal his repair work. Best policy, keep the door locked and when you take in repair work, no hanging around. Sorry for being so blunt.

Barbara
04-02-2004, 05:11 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> Quote
"Sit and talk for an hour or so while the glue sets up."

You mean waste an hour of his time, (Worth about $60.00 or so) as he is trying to work.

I know one cue maker who has all but lost his business, because his shop has turned into nothing but a hangout. They just can't take a hint, actually, he is too polite to give them one. They even mess with his equipment. The ones he helped out, that wanted to learn a little about cue repair, repaid him by going to the pool rooms around and trying to steal his repair work. Best policy, keep the door locked and when you take in repair work, no hanging around. Sorry for being so blunt. <hr /></blockquote>

Popcorn,

I can totally understand this. I would hate to waste his time because time is money. But friends are friends and we need to catch up on each other's lives.

Trust me, I would never want to waste his time either!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Barbara

BLACKHEART
04-02-2004, 05:33 PM
I do over 1000 tip replacements a year. I let the Super Glue Gel sit for 60 seconds, trim the edge,burnish the edge,shape the tip &amp; you can break with it, as soon as you find a table. If I waited 2 hours to let the glue dry, I'd be out of business, let alone letting it set over night...JER

Popcorn
04-02-2004, 06:07 PM
The problem is, you are one of many who would say the same thing. They drop off a cue for a $10.00 tip and spend 30 minutes talking about how they played in league last night. The same thing when they pick it up. This adds up and the guy ends up putting in 12 hour days and working into the night trying to do 8 hours worth of work. If you really are a friend, drop if off and say, "I know you are busy, I will be back in a few hours". Trust me, he would be much happier. I have lots of friends, but I don't go to where they work and hang around. I intentionally took this slant on the subject because it opened the door for me to say this. It is just so commonly done and very unfair to the man trying to make a living. Nothing personal.

Candyman
04-02-2004, 06:17 PM
They don't call it super glue for nothing! I was in industrial maintanence of 37 years and I depended on Loctite Products almost daily. They truely have a product for almost any kind of adhesive application you can imagine. Most products were designed to work PDQ. jm2cs /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Barbara
04-02-2004, 06:20 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> The problem is, you are one of many who would say the same thing. They drop off a cue for a $10.00 tip and spend 30 minutes talking about how they played in league last night. The same thing when they pick it up. This adds up and the guy ends up putting in 12 hour days and working into the night trying to do 8 hours worth of work. If you really are a friend, drop if off and say, "I know you are busy, I will be back in a few hours". Trust me, he would be much happier. I have lots of friends, but I don't go to where they work and hang around. I intentionally took this slant on the subject because it opened the door for me to say this. It is just so commonly done and very unfair to the man trying to make a living. Nothing personal. <hr /></blockquote>

Wow Popcorn. You really openend up my eyes. If you knew who I was referring to as My Cueman, you'd realize that you're making an a$$ of yourself.

And I'm not being all and almighty, he's just that personable and wants to sit and talk. Even with a Fred and a Jimbo. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif And Chris Cass finally found out just what a sweetie he is. And those are my terms.

Maybe one of these days, I might be able to introduce you to him and just sit and jaw. You really have some knowledge, maybe you can exchange some ideas.

Peace,

Barbara

Popcorn
04-02-2004, 06:46 PM
I had assumed you were talking about Barry Szamboti, I knew his father very well. That doesn't invalidate my point, even if it may not apply in your case. The mechanic that works on my wife's car, she won't let me touch it, was over for dinner not long ago. Just what we are talking about came up, he said it was the worst part of his business. People come in, ask a million questions, and because he specializes in exotic cars, in no time they are looking at the cars in the shop. "What are you doing to this car, Wow that is a nice car". He can't get rid of them and he is just a small two man shop. He said customers that don't and will never spend a dime, take up as much as 25% of his time everyday. He doesn't know what to do about it. You have to talk to customers, how else can you be in business. It would just be nice, if they could just on their own realize he has no time to just BS with them about cars. Many people, just by nature, are so self-centered, they just don't get it.

Tom_In_Cincy
04-02-2004, 08:08 PM
Popcorn,

Is it so difficult to say "Excuse me, I have to get back to work, see ya later"?

If they can't or won't do that, they are always going to have to live with the consequences.

Troy
04-02-2004, 10:18 PM
Whether it's during my shifts at the pool room or in the shop, that's just the way it has to be. Friends will understand, if it needs saying to friends in the first place.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tom_In_Cincy:</font><hr> Popcorn,

Is it so difficult to say "Excuse me, I have to get back to work, see ya later"?

If they can't or won't do that, they are always going to have to live with the consequences.
<hr /></blockquote>

Popcorn
04-02-2004, 11:12 PM
The thing is, the biggest enemy of a self employed person is a lack of self discipline. I go to my accounts office, who is a pool player, I know him since he was a kid coming in the pool room. The first thing he will say is, "Come on, lets go get something to eat or something". I always say no, it is the middle of his work day, he can't go screwing around with me like he has nothing better to do. Given any opportunity, most self employed people will goof off. That is why so many of them fail and work at home business require a person with exceptional discipline. People drop over and forget you are working, because you are at home.

My sister-in law moved her office to her home to save a little expenses and travel and in one year her business was on the ropes. She had "No" discipline at all. She was always playing catch up because all she did was goof off. and a lot of it had to do with friends who had nothing better to do who would come over. Cue makers are some of the worse self employed people I have ever met. I think that is why so many have such long waiting lists for cues, they never get any work done. They drop everything to do some little repair that comes in and never get back to what they were working on. They talk about putting in 70 or 80 hours a week, but you don't see the results of it. If you work right, you can work 40 hours and do more then the goof off does in 80 without growing to hate your business. They should work on a very strict schedule, maybe only do repairs two days a week. Never unlock the door without a plan for the day and commit to it and get it done. It is just common sense but doesn't seem to be part of the makeup of cue makers. I am off my soap box.

Popcorn
04-02-2004, 11:35 PM
It can be bad working at a pool room. Friends, if you can call them that, expect you to give the free table time or not ring up drinks. It can be very awkward if you are the owner, now asking friends for money. They say "What do I owe you", with that look. You find yourself saying, "Oh don't worry about it", or "Just give me $5.00" when they owe $20.00. You become resentful pretty quick, the lack of respect they seem to have for you. It can be an eye opening experience.

JDB
04-03-2004, 01:25 AM
Popcorn,

As usual, all of your posts make a lot of sense.

Always like reading your posts.

Rich R.
04-03-2004, 06:08 AM
Although I can appreciate the comments made by both Popcorn and Tom, I think you have to consider that the self employed cue maker, in a small shop, may not get much personal contact with other people. They may look forward to a little friendly conversation with an old friend. After all, they do not get to join in a conversation at the coffee pot or the water fountain, like many of us.

If the cue maker schedules his work properly, he can get a lot of his work done, when nobody is around, and allow a little time for conversation, when some one comes in. It is good business to take a little time, with good customers and old friends. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

That said, I agree with Popcorn. The cue maker can not afford to allow his shop to become a daily hangout, although I am sure a number of cue makers do that.

I think part of the reason anyone becomes self employed, is to allow themselves a little freedom in the scheduling of their work. A few more hours at the end of the day, may be worth a little enjoyment in the middle of the day.

Wally_in_Cincy
04-03-2004, 07:56 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr>...You mean waste an hour of his time, (Worth about $60.00 or so) as he is trying to work....<hr /></blockquote>

Those were my thoughts too when I read Barbara's post, but as she states, they are friends, and maybe, just maybe, Barry may enjoy talking to an intelligent attractive woman like Barbara as opposed to some other bum pool players.

He lurks here. Maybe he will share his thoughts.

Barbara
04-03-2004, 09:31 AM
Rich,

All of you guys have valid points. And you especially nailed it when you mentioned the lack of personal contact. While Barry is far from being a hermit, he just doesn't get out much at all. And when he does, it's usually for a family thing, not pool-related.

And Popcorn, if he didn't have time to sit and chat, he'd tell me.

Barbara

BLACKHEART
04-03-2004, 10:53 AM
You're right about the time management, of a small business. My brother had a furniture refinishing business. He was constantly going off, to have coffee with friends &amp; customers &amp; would end up working till midnight &amp; weekends to catch up. Your thought about your friends taking advantage, is also right on. I make &amp; sell Qs costing thousands of dollars all over the world,but friends seem to think I have a 1/2 off sale for them...JER

heater451
04-03-2004, 11:53 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> It can be bad working at a pool room. Friends, if you can call them that, expect you to give the free table time or not ring up drinks. It can be very awkward if you are the owner, now asking friends for money. They say "What do I owe you", with that look. You find yourself saying, "Oh don't worry about it", or "Just give me $5.00" when they owe $20.00. You become resentful pretty quick, the lack of respect they seem to have for you. It can be an eye opening experience. <hr /></blockquote>I've had several friends who worked in bars, and I never expected free drinks, although I got them from time to time. Of course, these people were not owners, but I was also often friendly with the owners, and still didn't expect anything for gratis. In fact, I almost feel that it's stealing, since the employees weren't paying for the drinks that they gave away (beyond a normal, two "comp" drinks).

For an owner, I think that they should always answer the "what do I owe you" question with the truth. It might be helpful to make a small production of consulting the cash register, or hand-totaling a ticket, before giving the amount, but they should never apologize--or even feel guilty for charging. It also might be better to make a point of saying, "I'll get this one for you" for the occasional drink, when serving it--but rarely, if ever, saying that for a whole tab. Hopefully, this will train the friends to understand that they don't get the policeman's discount all the time, and maybe they'll appreciate the odd freebie more.

Some people may not like it, but then what true "friend" expects to be comped all the time? Do they compensate in return, in what they do? (I will add, however, that some people may be friendly enough that the gifts are reciprocal, because their businesses support it. And, I am sure that some business people have long-time friends that warrant never getting charged--along the lines of, "You're money's no good here.")

Then there's the other end of the spectrum--when did you ever hear of a lawyer not charging? (j/k--I'm sure it happens all the time. . . . /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif )


========================

Barbara
04-03-2004, 12:02 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote heater451:</font><hr>
Some people may not like it, but then what true "friend" expects to be comped all the time? Do they compensate in return, in what they do? (I will add, however, that some people may be friendly enough that the gifts are reciprocal, because their businesses support it. And, I am sure that some business people have long-time friends that warrant never getting charged--along the lines of, "You're money's no good here.")

Then there's the other end of the spectrum--when did you ever hear of a lawyer not charging? (j/k--I'm sure it happens all the time. . . . /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif )


======================== <hr /></blockquote>

This is so true. As a Tour Coordinator, I do not "expect" to get comped at any room that's hosting an event for us. They're alreeady losing their day business to us. I do, however, ask to be able to run a tab and at the end of the event, I pay that tab. One time a room owner "lost" my tab. I ended up tipping the waitress $20 and the cook $20 - quite conveniently the amount of the "lost" tab. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Barbara

Troy
04-03-2004, 12:24 PM
Good for you Barbara. I'm proud of you... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Barbara:</font><hr> One time a room owner "lost" my tab. I ended up tipping the waitress $20 and the cook $20 - quite conveniently the amount of the "lost" tab. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Barbara <hr /></blockquote>

Ralph S.
04-03-2004, 01:51 PM
Popcorn, with all due respect, you are right and wrong at the same time. Not all small business owners or self-employeed people lack discipline. Many have sold off their businesses for very large amounts of money and some became leaders of the biggest companies in America. However, for every one that succeeds, many do fail. Your assessment of all being lacking of discipline was narrow minded to a degree.

Your coming down on Barbara was a little uncalled for too. There is a distinct possibility that they may have inititiated the conversation and if they complain afterwards, they have nobody to blame but themselves.

Being a small business owner, espescially a one man shop, you better be accustomed to working long hours. Many people wanting to become an entrepeneur, know this ahead of time. It is a sacrifice they know they will have to make to possibly be successful in the future.

Popcorn
04-03-2004, 03:06 PM
No business can function in chaos. Not only does the business suffer, but the owner and employees do as well. Nothing worse then working for a boss who has no idea what he is doing. Business owners who put in the long hours may very well love what they do so much it is not work to them. Long hours and constant problems though, can make you wonder why you even got into it. There is a day when you wake up and just don't want to do it any more. That is a sad thing if it was not necessary, and just the result of mismanagement. You know, when you work for yourself, you may be working for the worst boss you will ever have. Many failed business are the direct result of a the owner. You see it all the time, a new owner comes in and turns a failing business around. We have no disagreements though. Many owners are very good or learn fast enough before they self-destruct.

Troy
04-03-2004, 04:08 PM
All you say may be true, but that's NO REASON for you to come down so hard on Barbara. It is quite likely that she and Barry are really good friends and he actually WANTS to spend that time talking with her. This in NO WAY makes Barry a bad businessman.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> No business can function in chaos. Not only does the business suffer, but the owner and employees do as well. Nothing worse then working for a boss who has no idea what he is doing. Business owners who put in the long hours may very well love what they do so much it is not work to them. Long hours and constant problems though, can make you wonder why you even got into it. There is a day when you wake up and just don't want to do it any more. That is a sad thing if it was not necessary, and just the result of mismanagement. You know, when you work for yourself, you may be working for the worst boss you will ever have. Many failed business are the direct result of a the owner. You see it all the time, a new owner comes in and turns a failing business around. We have no disagreements though. Many owners are very good or learn fast enough before they self-destruct. <hr /></blockquote>

Barbara
04-03-2004, 04:28 PM
Okay, whoa! Everyone? Let's chill a little... okay?

First of all, Popcorn had some very valid points and I tried to send him a pm to say so and apologize for calling him an a$$ last night, but he doesn't accept pms. BTW Tom and Rich R also had valid inputs.

I know where I stand with Barry and anyone else for that matter. I don't presume anything with anyone. I'm a Tour Coordinator and when I start treating anyone without respect or presume things that I shouldn't, I'm in trouble and I lose respect for not only me and my Tour, but my members as well.

And no, Wally, Barry's not going to input on this thread. but he did call me today and told me that when he has time for me, he has time. And if anything should change on that day that he doesn't have time, I'm outta there because it's his business and that's that.

Love you guys and gals and let's lighten up here. No flame wars, okay? You know that the CCB Admin will be right on all our butts if that happens.

Thanks,

Barbara /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Popcorn
04-03-2004, 04:45 PM
I don't think I ever said that. I was speaking objectively and I don't think she took it personal, because she knows her relationship with him better then I do.

Troy
04-03-2004, 10:45 PM
PEACE !!!

'nuf said... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Popcorn
04-04-2004, 12:02 AM
Next time you talk to Barry Szamboti, tell him the guy you are posting with was a good friend of
Louie Esposito. I bought one of the first cues his dad ever built on Louie's recommendation, maybe the first cue he built that was sold. His dad made me quite a few cues over the years. Here are a couple of pictures he may like to see. One is his dad doing a trick shot on his table and the other is a picture on his mom and dad when my wife was picking up her new cue. His dad is looking down at the dog. This is around 1980 I would guess. I spoke to Gus not long before he died and we talked quite a while about the cue business. He had a lot of plans how he was going to change what he was doing. He felt a little angry and betrayed that players had taken advantage of him over the years. He would make them a cue they would beg him for as a rush job,(I am talking name players), only to have them sell the cue for twice as much as he charged them. He said, things were going to change, but it was never to be.
http://www.81x.com/Authors/popcorn23/gus.JPG
http://www.81x.com/Authors/popcorn23/gus1.JPG

Barry
04-04-2004, 07:56 AM
Popcorn,
Thank You for the pictures of my Mom and Dad.
I do not want to argue with you or anyone else. I will let the group know that Barb is a DEAR FRIEND and is always concerned for me. We are honest with each other and if I'm busy we get together later.

I recognize your opinions and you make general points that can be valid about people in their own business.

The only thing I want everyone to know is that Barb is ALWAYS welcome in my Home and my Shop!

Barry Szamboti

Popcorn
04-04-2004, 11:19 AM
Do you have any memories of Louie? He was quite a guy and a very good player. Was he at all instrumental in your dad getting into building cues?

Barry
04-04-2004, 12:17 PM
Popcorn,
I only heard Dad tell stories about him. Some family and some gambling. He wasn't responsible for Dad building cues, but may have had something to do with Dad playing pool as well as He did.

Barry