PDA

View Full Version : Barringer's Shaft Sealer



SpiderMan
04-12-2004, 10:04 AM
Has anyone used this product?

http://www.cuecomponents.com/shaftdealer.html

Specifically, I'm wondering:

1. Did it change the color of the wood?

2. What did it feel like after sanding? Just like the bare wood, or did it feel like a surface coating?

3. Any opinions on long-term effects? Did this product really "close the pores" and prevent discoloration due to chalk build-up?

SpiderMan

stickman
04-12-2004, 10:54 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> Has anyone used this product?

<font color="blue">Not me, but I'm interested. I currently use Cue Man Billiard Products. I think it is a cyanoacrylate formulation. .
</font color>

http://www.cuecomponents.com/shaftdealer.html

Specifically, I'm wondering:

1. Did it change the color of the wood?

<font color="blue">Mine doesn't necessarily change the color of the wood. More like the difference between flat black or gloss black. When sanded, it gives a nice smooth and glossy surface. </font color>



2. What did it feel like after sanding? Just like the bare wood, or did it feel like a surface coating?

<font color="blue">Mine feels slicker. It is glossier than bare wood, but not sticky. The three or four inches near the joint usually are sealed with something like a polyurethane. The polyurethane is noticeably glossier.</font color>

3. Any opinions on long-term effects? Did this product really "close the pores" and prevent discoloration due to chalk build-up?

<font color="blue">I've used the sealer for only about 6 months. I'd be more worried about the person putting the sealer on than the shaft. It's pretty strong. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif I am happy to tell you that it does prevent discoloration due to chalk build-up. </font color>

SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue">I believe in the use of a shaft sealer, but there might be a product that is healthier to use.

Jim </font color>

SpiderMan
04-12-2004, 03:45 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote stickman:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> Has anyone used this product?

<font color="blue">Not me, but I'm interested. I currently use Cue Man Billiard Products. I think it is a cyanoacrylate formulation. .
<font color="blue">I've used the sealer for only about 6 months. I'd be more worried about the person putting the sealer on than the shaft. It's pretty strong. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif I am happy to tell you that it does prevent discoloration due to chalk build-up. </font color>

Jim </font color> <hr /></blockquote>

Stick,

Got a URL?

SpiderMan

SPetty
04-12-2004, 03:55 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr>Got a URL?<hr /></blockquote> http://www.cuesmith.com/main/accessories/index.php

stickman
04-12-2004, 04:02 PM
That's the place. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif I love the stuff, but constant exposure is probably not good for you.

Big_Jon
04-12-2004, 04:25 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> Has anyone used this product?

http://www.cuecomponents.com/shaftdealer.html

Specifically, I'm wondering:

1. Did it change the color of the wood?

2. What did it feel like after sanding? Just like the bare wood, or did it feel like a surface coating?

3. Any opinions on long-term effects? Did this product really "close the pores" and prevent discoloration due to chalk build-up?

SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>

I've got some, here is the best I can do:

1) It hasn't changed the color, just a different "hue" if you will.
2) After sanding, well it depends on how much you sand /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif, if you just take the "glaze" off, it feels smooth, but if you sand back down to the wood (it's supposed to "penetrate" down) it's a lot smoother.

3) Well, I haven't noticed any "long term" effects yet, but if my camera was working, I would show you the bluing, I usually (when cleaning my shaft via lathe) sand w/600 (knocking glaze off). Then clean with lacquer thinner (just don't smoke when using it lol, great shaft of fire), then sand w/600 again, seal, sand w/600, apply wax, burnish, and buff, sand w/2000. I have "moist" hands when I play, so it gums up after about a week, then all I need is a damp paper towel and a dry one, and it's back to normal.
I tried just sanding the sealer (no wax) this past weekend, and my shaft is blue, not bluish green or brown or yellow, the same color as the chalk. I wouldn't mind using something else, and keep the Barringer sealer for under the clear coat.

Thanks,

Jon

Big_Jon
04-12-2004, 04:28 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> Has anyone used this product?

http://www.cuecomponents.com/shaftdealer.html

Specifically, I'm wondering:

1. Did it change the color of the wood?

2. What did it feel like after sanding? Just like the bare wood, or did it feel like a surface coating?

3. Any opinions on long-term effects? Did this product really "close the pores" and prevent discoloration due to chalk build-up?

SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>

Oh and just another question for Spiderman, how do people (like Scott at proficient) get that really shiny look on the edge of the tip? I've tried saliva, water (via q-tip), superglue, sealer (before shaping tip), wax (also before shaping tip), and even all of the above with polishing compound. All to no avail. What's the secret lol?

Thanks,

Jon

SpiderMan
04-13-2004, 09:25 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Big_Jon:</font><hr> Oh and just another question for Spiderman, how do people (like Scott at proficient) get that really shiny look on the edge of the tip? I've tried saliva, water (via q-tip), superglue, sealer (before shaping tip), wax (also before shaping tip), and even all of the above with polishing compound. All to no avail. What's the secret lol?

Thanks,

Jon
<hr /></blockquote>

Jon,

Superglue seems to give the shiniest glass-like gloss for me. If it didn't work for you, I wonder how you put it on? What I do is finish-sand the sidewalls up to about 2000 grit, then spit-burnish to a gloss before applying anything else.

Next, I wrap a layer of Scotch tape around the ferrule at the base of the tip, so that the glue doesn't get on anything else. Then I put a drop of SG on my index finger (covered by a piece of plastic from a grocery sack) and apply to the sidewalls while the shaft is spinning in the lathe. I immediately stop the lathe and peel off the tape before the glue eats into it. Then I let the glue dry. The high gloss is provided by letting the glue self-level and harden without any further treatment.

Finally, after the glue dries, I use a razor blade to shave the glue "step" smooth where the tape was masking the ferrule. Then I touch up the crown on the tip to eliminate any glue that flowed over onto it, and remove the shaft from the lathe.

The result is a hard glassy surface on the sidewalls. It won't last forever, but it will keep it's looks a lot longer than a plain spit polish.

SpiderMan