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View Full Version : All different aiming systems represented!



superstroke
04-22-2004, 06:52 PM
I think if we all put our minds together we could all post down our aiming techniques. It would be neat to see everyones different approaches and at the same time, when everyone is done posting here, this particular thread is going to be every informative.
For example:
On spot shot type angle shots I like to aim the edge of the furrel to the edge of the object ball.

Bob_Jewett
04-22-2004, 09:24 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote superstroke:</font><hr>... For example:
On spot shot type angle shots I like to aim the edge of the (ferrule) to the edge of the object ball. <hr /></blockquote>
If you place the cue ball so your stick passes over the corner pocket on a spot shot, the shot is half-ball -- the stick aims directly at the edge of the object ball.

Various systems:

Fractional ball (1/4 1/2 3/4 or with finer divisions)

Ferrule-based (side of ferrule to some point on OB)

Overlapping lens (for thin cuts, shown in my June column)

Shadow at the base of the ball (gives about a 3/4 hit)

Ghost or phantom cue ball

Inch and an eighth (Actually, to the center of the ghost ball)

Martin shows how to shoot a spot shot by aiming at a diamond rather than the object ball, but I think that's insanity.

Using reflections of lights on either the cue ball or object ball as targets. (Yes, this sometimes works.)

In Kanov and Stauch's "Pool Player's Edge," there is a long section on how to adjust aim when beginning or having problems.

Some would include "aim and pivot" or "backhand english" in aiming systems, but I'd put them in squirt compensation methods.

Popcorn
04-22-2004, 10:32 PM
I used to know a guy named Doc Hazard and he had a system for everything, he used to drive me nuts with all that stuff. I don't use any systems when I play, no tricks, I know where I want to hit the ball and what I want to do. 95% of what I do involving making the shot, takes place before I ever get down. When I am finally down on the ball I am ready to shoot. I do believe some systems may be of value as a training device, but not when you are actually playing. You just mentally can't be doing all that stuff when you are playing, it undermines your play. OK in practice, not good in real play.

randyg
04-23-2004, 05:09 AM
POPCORN: How right you might be! All systems must be properly taught so that you operate in "sub-concious motor funtion". Some what like riding a 1947 Harley. In the begining we had to train the both hands, the right foot and the left foot, all at the same time. Now we just go, no thought process involved. Why, because we started with a system to operate our Harley.....randyg

pooltchr
04-23-2004, 06:18 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote randyg:</font><hr> POPCORN: How right you might be! All systems must be properly taught so that you operate in "sub-concious motor funtion". Some what like riding a 1947 Harley. In the begining we had to train the both hands, the right foot and the left foot, all at the same time. Now we just go, no thought process involved. Why, because we started with a system to operate our Harley.....randyg <hr /></blockquote>

Randy...Just don't let that "HD Grip" find it's way into your pool game! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
Steve

cheesemouse
04-23-2004, 06:31 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> I used to know a guy named Doc Hazard and he had a system for everything, he used to drive me nuts with all that stuff. I don't use any systems when I play, no tricks, I know where I want to hit the ball and what I want to do. 95% of what I do involving making the shot, takes place before I ever get down. When I am finally down on the ball I am ready to shoot. I do believe some systems may be of value as a training device, but not when you are actually playing. You just mentally can't be doing all that stuff when you are playing, it undermines your play. OK in practice, not good in real play. <hr /></blockquote>

Hear! Hear! I love to mess with stuff when I practice but when the music starts I gotta just dance with what brung me...LOL...when an instructor like Randy G indictates the same you know your on to something.

Fred Agnir
04-23-2004, 07:05 AM
Among those that have already been said:

Double-the-distance


Edges and Centers
Small Ball Aiming
9/16ths
Points of Lights (or light if it's a single tube)

Feel


Fred

#### leonard
04-23-2004, 07:14 AM
Ahhh Yes, E.C. "Doc" Hazard. W.C Fields and Doc Hazard what a pair.####

cheesemouse
04-23-2004, 07:54 AM
Fred,

What is double-the-distance? Just curious, thanks in advance..... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fred Agnir
04-23-2004, 08:26 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote cheesemouse:</font><hr> Fred,

What is double-the-distance? Just curious, thanks in advance..... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote>The theory is that on a cut shot, the contact point is directly in the middle of the overlapping edges of the cueball and object ball, if you could see through the balls. Drawing it would be easier to explain.

If you look at the distance from the center of the object ball to the theoretical contact point, then the aimpoint for the center of the cueball is "double the distance" or "twice as far."

Double the Distance (http://groups.google.com/groups?q=twice++group:rec.sport.billiard+author:sh epard&amp;hl=en&amp;lr=&amp;ie=UTF-8&amp;oe=UTF-8&amp;selm=shepard-2909971824020001%40macrls.tcg.anl.gov&amp;rnum=7)

Fred

daviddjmp
04-23-2004, 08:50 AM
Bob-

Which of these do you use?

04-23-2004, 09:34 AM

Bob_Jewett
04-23-2004, 10:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote daviddjmp:</font><hr> Bob-

Which of these do you use? <hr /></blockquote>
When I'm playing well, none of them. See the ball, shoot the ball -- it's as simple as that.

However, I think it is useful for beginners and struggling veterans to have some kind of systems available for when they are at a loss to see the angle.

bluewolf
04-23-2004, 11:10 AM
I tried some aiming systems early on, thought about half ball hits, ghost ball and several others and really came to the conclusion that the more I play, the better I will get and that takes time. Gotta put in the time...

Laura

PastPrime
04-23-2004, 11:11 AM
For over 95% of all Bank Shots (you can see instantly the ones that it won't work on) I have found that by incorporating Hal Houle's method of lineing up any bank by keeping the tip slightly to the right or left, then swerving (similiar to backside english) and aiming the center of the cue ball to the correct edge, right or left, of the object ball. That gives us the spot to aim then I simply refine it to the closest one of three points to the left or right of the object ball. This works for short rail or long rail banks and has helped me tremendously. The same system will work well for two or three rail shots also. It sounds complicated but after a few minutes practice it is almost instantaneous. I have selectively shown this to some good players and they grasped it immediately. Of course you need to use a consistant speed or adjust for any English or extra length.

141and3c
04-23-2004, 01:03 PM
Of course kick shots are the toughest. On a tough kick, I sometimes visualize trying to miss the kick on both short and long sides of the object ball. Then, I divide the difference with cushion spot hit, speed, or english.

superstroke
04-23-2004, 03:53 PM
I agree with you to an extent. Thereare certain shots that come up in a game that could be made easier if you had a system for it. Maybe the system just gives you an extra bit of confidence, but whatever it does it helps.

DMoney1644
04-23-2004, 04:09 PM
i use ghost ball almost exclusively. i used to shoot by some weird combination of the "holy light" system, ghost ball, and distant point. needless to say, it didn't work very well. as soon as i switched to ghost ball my game picked up quite a bit. and yes, im a noob.

#### leonard
04-24-2004, 11:18 AM
I like his shooting off the end rail at a ball that was straight in line with the cue ball. His system was to aim straight at the object ball and your bridge thumb straight up and it would put english on the cueball and whamo the ball would go in the pocket. ####

phil in sofla
04-25-2004, 11:12 AM
Not sure if this has been mentioned in the thread, but I didn't see it.

Very thin cuts on balls close to the rail are often undercut, hitting the ball too thick.

Many people advocate getting the line on the ball (however one does that; as the thread illustrates, many possible ways), and then, sighting beyond that, to a spot on the rail, fixing that in your aim, and then letting the shot go.

Sid_Vicious
04-25-2004, 11:57 AM
I too have adopted feel, and also dwell on the stroke refinement as premier. Very rarely do I use sighting tricks, but there is one or two that gives me a touch more confidence. All in all though, we all think too darn much about what's happening while we are down on a shot...sid~~~currently on a pool sabbatical, so take what I say with a bit of skepticism