PDA

View Full Version : Keyball before the break?



mickey2
04-24-2004, 08:56 AM
What sort of balls do you like to keep as a keyball in 14/1

One of the key balls I Like:
START( %AM0S9%BL7P8%CJ5O4%DL7N1%EM7P1%FK6P1%GK6N8%HM7N8%I L7O4%JK6M5 %KJ5P7%LJ5N2%MK6Q4%NJ5R0%OQ0V5%PV9P5 )END

15 =key ball 1 break

http://endeavor.med.nyu.edu/~wei/pool/pooltable2.html

What balls do you like to keep as the last 3-4 balls ?

Wally_in_Cincy
04-24-2004, 09:23 AM
In a perfect world?

START(
%AM0S9%BL7P8%CJ5O4%DL7N1%EM7P1%FK6P1%GK6N8%HM7N8%I L7O4%JK6M5
%KJ5P7%LJ5N2%MK6Q4%NJ5R0%OX7U7%PV4P8%U[4[6%VY0V8
)END

/ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Wally_in_Cincy
04-24-2004, 09:24 AM
or this

START(
%AM0S9%BL7P8%CJ5O4%DL7N1%EM7P1%FK6P1%GK6N8%HM7N8%I L7O4%JK6M5
%KJ5P7%LJ5N2%MK6Q4%NJ5R0%Og2U4%P[1Q4%Uq5Z4%Vh1U9
)END

or leave the cueball in the rack

START(
%AN0K2%FK1M8%PP3S3%UD5E0%VJ3L8

)END

04-24-2004, 09:27 AM
I'm embarrassed to tell you how long it took me to learn this, Mickey, but this concept comes from Dan DiLiberto: the ideal key ball is one inside the rack area, with an angle that allows you to send the cue ball two rails around your proposed break shot. Even if you under-hit it slightly, the angle still works in your favor...and if you wind up too straight on the key ball, you can always just stop-shot it in and accept ball-in-hand behind the string for your break. GF

Popcorn
04-24-2004, 10:31 AM
Like George Fells, I also learned this from Danny D. What they are, are key balls that almost guarantee you getting into the next rack. For the beginning player who can't seem to run multiple racks, keeping key balls a little away from your break ball that let you in a zillion ways fall on your break shot, will have you running balls in no time. The problem with many players when keeping key balls, is keeping key balls that you have to get perfectly on in order for you to fall on the break shot. It is amazing how many good key balls there are on the table that work fine. The balls I show on the table are not meant to be exact but to illustrate a theory, they could be a little different. I have taught this to players that could never run over a rack or two who in no time were running 50 and 60 balls. I play this way, I have a perfect key ball in mind, but I always keep balls out that I know will keep me going if something changes. One of the secretes of playing, is playing a game that works for you within your abilities, we are not all Mosconi. I heard someone say something funny about Mosconi once at a tournament. He said " Here we have the greatest collection of pool talent in this room, since Mosconi was here by himself".
Of course I know where he got the quote, but it fit.


START(
%AN0T2%Bf6S3%CJ7O4%DL8N2%E[1R8%FK7P1%GK7N8%Hk9I8%I[2G3%JK8M6
%KJ7P7%LJ7N2%MK7Q3%NJ9Q7%OG4H3%PB2\7%RN4S1
)END

Steve Lipsky
04-24-2004, 11:46 AM
Another important concept involves key balls on the rail near the break shot. For the most part, they are pretty terrible and should be avoided. You must land on them perfectly to keep them valid, and as Popcorn pointed out, this is usually trouble.

Here's an example:

START(
%AO2W4%Bg4Z5%CJ7O4%DL8N2%EO3[0%FK7P1%GK7N8%HM7N8%IL7O4%JK8M6
%KJ7P7%LJ7N2%MK7Q3%NJ7Q9%OJ7M0%P[3Y3
)END

In this situation, I like to shoot the 5, and then the 2. It seems counterintuitive, since the 5 is closer to the break shot. But if you get a little out of line on the 5 (as your keyball), your run is in jeopardy. You could wind up in a very common pitfall - too much angle to hold it, too little to cross it. The 2, at the other end of the table (and especially since it's a bit off the rail) provides a much greater margin of error than does the 5.

Another really useful endrack pattern is the following:

START(
%AN0K5%EJ8R1%JG5N1%PP8M5

)END

Sometimes a player might have been playing for the 1 as the breakshot the whole rack, and then when this situation comes up plays the 5 to the 10 to the 1. But changing the breakshot from the 1 to the 10 makes the most sense here. It's stop-stop (1 to 5 to 10), much easier to get perfect, and the 10 is just as good a breakshot as the 1, if not better.

For me, the hardest part of learning straight pool was/is that patterns do not have to be "classic" in order to be workable. If you can find a way to play the balls without moving the cueball much, take it.

- Steve

#### leonard
04-25-2004, 10:34 AM
That was the Joe Canton style of playing 14.1. He had a last 5 ball pattern that he would use 40% of the time. It took me time to realize that he would manufacture that layout while he was clearing the balls off.####

mickey2
04-25-2004, 12:18 PM
Thank you very much to all of you!

Your replies gave me plenty to think of, now itís time to put it into reality on the table.

Chris Cass
04-25-2004, 11:05 PM
Food for thought. Those who don't play the game. It also works for 8 ball.

Regards,

C.C.

SpiderMan
04-26-2004, 09:10 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mickey2:</font><hr> What sort of balls do you like to keep as a keyball in 14/1

What balls do you like to keep as the last 3-4 balls ?
<hr /></blockquote>

The one, five, nine, and twelve.

SpiderMan

Leviathan
04-27-2004, 07:27 AM
GF: Greetings from Duke Mantee. Could you give us a Wei table diagram of a setup of the kind you describe? Thanks--AS

Wei table: http://endeavor.med.nyu.edu/%7Ewei/pool/pooltable2.html

thecardman
04-28-2004, 03:09 PM
Can someone please help me out and stop me going crazier than I already am!!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

How do I get to see the diagrams of the tables that you are all talking about? All I get is a bunch of letters and symbols. Is there something I need to download??? Please help - I want to learn!!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

Many thanks in advance.

thecardman
/ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Popcorn
04-28-2004, 03:25 PM
Just copy the code and go here and paste it in.

http://endeavor.med.nyu.edu/~wei/pool/9egg/

thecardman
04-30-2004, 03:59 PM
Popcorn

Thanks for the help. It's a great help!

thecardman
/ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

tateuts
04-30-2004, 08:37 PM
The "ideal" break shots are not always available on a table, or if you mess up on shape you may have to shoot your break ball. It's a good idea to practice secondary break shots. Here's one of my favorites. What you do is hit the cue ball pretty hard with low outside (in this case, left) english. This rack breaks up well enough and if you stroke it, the cueball will come back to the siderail and spin to the middle of the table.

START(
%AD1J4%BL8P7%CJ7O4%DL8N2%EM7P1%FK7P1%GK7N8%HM7N8%I L7O4%JK8M6
%KJ7P7%LJ7N2%MK7Q3%NJ7Q9%OJ7M0%PG3R5%_I3Q0%`D1K6%a G3R1%bT5P5
%cL3[0%dI6Q8
)END

Basically, it's good to have three or four of these alternate type of break shots you are very familiar with in your hip pocket in case the usual favorites don't work out. Key ball position on the shot is pretty obvious.

Chris

Frank_Glenn
04-30-2004, 08:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote tateuts:</font><hr>
Basically, it's good to have three or four of these alternate type of break shots you are very familiar with in your hip pocket in case the usual favorites don't work out. Key ball position on the shot is pretty obvious.

Chris <hr /></blockquote>

Here's one that's always good when you "have" to shoot your break ball.

START(
%A[3H3%BL8P7%CJ7O4%DL8N2%EM7P1%FK7P1%GK7N8%HM7N8%IL7O 4%JK8M6
%KJ7P7%LJ7N2%MK7Q3%NJ7Q9%OJ7M0%P`1N0%W[4C7%X[0G6%eB2b1%_N7M5
%`V4I7%a[1H8%b[6I4%c]2K0%d_4M2
)END

http://endeavor.med.nyu.edu/%7Ewei/pool/pooltable2.html