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shooter72283
04-28-2004, 12:36 AM
My buddy and I have recently started playing straight pool when we gamble with each other, instead of 9-ball or 1P (the only way he'll play me in 1P these days is if I spot him 6-10, and he hates 9-ball, neither of us are big fans of 8-ball). I like the game and am familiar with the rules, but I don't know anything about the various strategies behind it. Could somebody fill me in with some tactics every straight pool player should know?

Popcorn
04-28-2004, 01:30 AM
Some things to know, from my point of view anyway.
Once you are open with a makeable shot, your opponent is no longer a factor, he may in fact, possibly never come to the table again.
Try not to leave the table on a miss.
No score is insurmountable, you can win games from very far behind and lose them needing one.
Try to run balls in one area at a time, avoiding moving all around the table. You don't want the last few balls to be all over the table, but in one area with the key ball close by.
Always know the score and never forget how you came to the table. If you came to the table on an opponents scratch, he is on "1". No matter what happens, you can always take a scratch if you remember he is on "1", no matter how long you have been at the table.
If you see problems with the rack, deal with them early while you still have options.
Know your break shots and how the rack reacts to when it is hit. It is often predictable how the balls will break.
Balls by pockets are in the way of other balls, clear the pockets.
Study dead balls and how they react, throw and so forth.
Look for dead balls, even if you don't shoot them, you need to know they are there. I once saw Mike Massey play a safe putting a guy up table and leave a dead ball. He was the only guy in the room who did not see it, he lost by the way due to the dead ball with a 50 point lead at the time. This was in Vegas a few years ago, I think he was playing Grady if I remember right, it was Grady's tournament.
It is a creative game with many theories of how to play it, but those are a few of mine. I almost forgot the biggest one, don't get something so set in your mind that it keeps you from seeing other options. There is nothing wrong with altering a plan as things happen.

1Time
04-28-2004, 01:31 AM
Make sure you have a decent break, the one where you barely clip a rear corner ball of the rack. Don't break the rack open and go for a run until you are certain you can pocket a ball with that shot. Practice shooting shots that pocket a ball and break the rack open. String racks together by leaving the last ball and cue in shape to pocket it and break the rack open. Play safe when you are not sure you will make a shot so you don't leave your opponent a chance to make a run.

dmgwalsh
04-28-2004, 04:29 AM
The above comments are all great. I am just a neophyte in the game. Some learning aids include "Play your best Straight pool" by Phil Capelle, Mike Sigel tapes, Perfect Pool and Run out series, Rempe tapes, How to run a rack and How to run 100 balls, and Grady Matthews straight Pool. Babe Cranfield has a book, the straight pool bible.

I like to throw about 5 balls out near the rack and concentrate on getting a break shot for the next rack. practice the break shot and don't overhit it. Practice safes on a 14 ball rack so you can see where to hit the rack safely.

There was a thread here within the last month where I believe Steve Lipsky illustrated his favorite break shots. check it out. Search this forum for straight pool. There's a lot of good stuff. Dennis

Wally_in_Cincy
04-28-2004, 06:39 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dmgwalsh:</font><hr> ..., Rempe tapes, How to run a rack and How to run 100 balls... <hr /></blockquote>

My personal favorite tapes.

Something that was not mentioned, if the stack is not completely broken up I like to leave an "insurance ball" near a side pocket or a head corner pocket in case I go into the stack and leave myself no shot into the bottom corner pockets.

All this stuff is on Rempe's tapes. I highly recommend them.

daviddjmp
04-28-2004, 09:39 AM
I watch the Jim Rempe tapes over and over again, as well as Cappelle's book which I have read about 4 times. Rempe's "How To Run a Rack in Straight Pool" is fabulous because he thinks out loud while he is playing. This is the best single resource IMO on straight pool technique available-

Chris Cass
04-30-2004, 12:45 AM
Hi Shooter,

You've already have gotten plenty of great advice. I will add one small thought that might help you out. It's simple and a good thing to bare in mind. Especially if your a 1p player.

You only need 7 balls each rack and 1 rack where you score 8 to win the game. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif The reason I mention this is because as a one pocket player too. I don't need to run racks to win. I only need to play smart. I do go for many runs when I can but not afraid to take a safe over a questionable breakout shot.

One other thing to do is check the rack everytime it's your inning. It's easy to pass up a dead ball in the rack if you don't check it frequently. Even the slightest movement can render you an opportunity. So, everytime you effect the rack, check it.

Ok, another thing in the way of moves. LOL Watch the player that puts their hand on the table near the rack. It appears he or she is looking if the ball will go but in reality they might be moving the cloth ever so slightly to ripple it and the ripple from the cloth actually moves the ball slightly enough, that it might go. LOL Tell me you haven't seen that move. LOL

Regards,

C.C.~~ok, three more things. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Wally_in_Cincy
04-30-2004, 06:57 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chris Cass:</font><hr>
...Watch the player that puts their hand on the table near the rack. It appears he or she is looking if the ball will go but in reality they might be moving the cloth ever so slightly to ripple it and the ripple from the cloth actually moves the ball slightly enough, that it might go. LOL Tell me you haven't seen that move. LOL <hr /></blockquote>

I haven't seen that move /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

One more thing. If your opponent fouls and leaves you no shot don't be afraid to play an intentional foul.

Steve Lipsky
04-30-2004, 08:37 AM
Hey Chris. Johnny Ervolino was famous for being able to nudge balls with his nose. He'd get down really close, as if straining to determine if the ball was dead... but in reality all he was doing was getting close enough to move the damned thing with his nose.

Sometimes he'd move it too far, in which case he'd have to get down again and move it back.

For the life of me I can't imagine letting someone get away with this lol.

- Steve

dmgwalsh
04-30-2004, 09:01 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Steve Lipsky:</font><hr> Hey Chris. Johnny Ervolino was famous for being able to nudge balls with his nose. He'd get down really close, as if straining to determine if the ball was dead... but in reality all he was doing was getting close enough to move the damned thing with his nose.
- Steve <hr /></blockquote>

I was listening to him call the sequences on the Dallas West Mike Zuglan match last night. very knowledgeable.

Chris Cass
04-30-2004, 10:42 AM
Hi Wally,

That's not what I heard from Eric Durbin. HAHAHAHA J/K Most don't pick up on it. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Regards,

C.C.

Chris Cass
04-30-2004, 10:45 AM
HAHAHAHAHA He's definitely has the shnozz for it. LOL Man it's good hearing from you Steve. Hope all is well and hope I can make it to the Open this yr. Will you be going?

Regards,

C.C.~~wishing Gina Kim well... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif