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View Full Version : Greetings and a question about the USPPA



TonyR
05-02-2004, 07:59 AM
Hi folks. It's been a while since I've posted here. A long while. (I'm thinking at least 2 years, probably closer to 3.)

I see that some of the "old guard" is still here (Fred Agnir, Barbara, etc.). Also, some seem to be missing (Fran Crimi, George Fels, etc.). At any rate, it's good to be back.

A quick summary of what I've been up to, pool-wise, then I promise I'll get to my question:

I quit playing seriously for a couple of years, starting around mid-2001 (due to shifting priorities). Yeah, I still played, but only occasionally. It wasn't uncommon for a month to pass before I whipped out my cue. Those who knew me from way back, especially from when I was playing in college, would have gone into shock had they found out, simply because there was a time when I'd get the shakes if I went for more than two days without playing/practicing.

Then, from January of 2003 to November of 2003, I didn't shoot a ball. I did, however, buy a few (more) accu-stat tapes, a new cue (Schon) and watched the June Reno open. Even when I'm not playing, I'm addicted and can't stay away from the game.

In November, I moved to Los Angeles and started playing again. I shot around some in House of Billiards in Sherman Oaks (Hello to anybody who plays there and posts here who might remember me) before moving out of Los Angeles again (only a temporary move). For about the first three months I was reluctant to play anybody but "The Ghost", then I decided if I was really going to get serious (even semi-serious) about this game again, I needed somebody shooting back at me. So, I played a few of the regulars and signed up for the weekly USPPA tournament (only played in one before moving out of L.A., though... I played like sh*t, btw).

And now for my question...

For those of you who are utterly familiar with the USPPA system...

What are the average runs for people at various... well, averages? How many balls will someone at, say, 50, run on average on a good day? 75? 100? 125? I don't want to know what the "secret formula" is or anything like that. I just want to rate my own game before I play in a USPPA tournament again (short on funds right now). Find out approximately where I am right now, without the ambiguous guesswork. (my average is currently a 68, but with only two sheets)


Thank you in advance,

Tony (old guard)

Tom_In_Cincy
05-02-2004, 10:52 AM
TonyR,

Welcome Back.

I run the USPPA tournaments at Hard Times Billiards in Sacramento, CA.

My estimations for your questions.

50 speed should be able to run out occasionally
75 speed should be able to run out at least once in a race to 5
100 speed should be able to run out at least once and maybe twice in a race to 5
125 speed will always run out at least one rack.
After those ratings, 125+ the performance level is capable of stringing runout racks.

Hope this helps and once again... Welcome

Troy
05-02-2004, 01:06 PM
That's a fair explanation.

Troy...~~~ USPPA TD at Campbell Billiards
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tom_In_Cincy:</font><hr> TonyR,

Welcome Back.

I run the USPPA tournaments at Hard Times Billiards in Sacramento, CA.

My estimations for your questions.

50 speed should be able to run out occasionally
75 speed should be able to run out at least once in a race to 5
100 speed should be able to run out at least once and maybe twice in a race to 5
125 speed will always run out at least one rack.
After those ratings, 125+ the performance level is capable of stringing runout racks.

Hope this helps and once again... Welcome

<hr /></blockquote>

superstroke
05-02-2004, 05:41 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tom_In_Cincy:</font><hr> TonyR,

Welcome Back.

I run the USPPA tournaments at Hard Times Billiards in Sacramento, CA.

My estimations for your questions.

50 speed should be able to run out occasionally
75 speed should be able to run out at least once in a race to 5
100 speed should be able to run out at least once and maybe twice in a race to 5
125 speed will always run out at least one rack.
After those ratings, 125+ the performance level is capable of stringing runout racks.

Hope this helps and once again... Welcome

<hr /></blockquote>WHen you say 100 speed should run out 1 maybe 2 on a run to 5. Do you mean break and run 2 racks or run out first chance he gets with an open table?

Tom_In_Cincy
05-03-2004, 12:16 AM
either way, but 100 speeds are able to break and run also.

TonyR
05-03-2004, 07:27 AM
Tom -

That definitely helps... takes some of the guesswork out of this crazy system. About five years ago, I was rated at a 65 (with about five sheets -- I've never gotten myself anywhere near established) and I won three race to five matches in a tournament, totally skewered my opponents, then lost to some dude who only had to win two games against me. He did so by banging away at the nine-ball. When I came back the next week, I was a 49. Never could figure that out.

The next time I decided to get myself into the system (about 2 years later... I played mostly in a very small 8-ball tournament in my local pool hall between USPPA memberships), they started me out at a 65, and I played like crap in the tournament (though, I won two matches). The next week I was an 82. I played a few tournaments at that speed (not too poorly, either... surprised myself).

This time, they started me at a 75 based on watching me warm up, but I played terribly in the tournament (hadn't played under pressure in about two years). Now, I'm a 68. Your assessment, however, matches my observations at House of Billiards. I guess getting established is the key.

Thank you and good to see you again, Tom_In_Cincy/SacTown.

Troy
05-03-2004, 07:40 AM
With very few score sheets, it is extremely easy for your average to swing. The more score sheets, the larger the base, the smaller the swing.
This may help explain it -- http://www.usppa.com/sheetex.htm

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote TonyR:</font><hr> Tom -

That definitely helps... takes some of the guesswork out of this crazy system. About five years ago, I was rated at a 65 (with about five sheets -- I've never gotten myself anywhere near established) and I won three race to five matches in a tournament, totally skewered my opponents, then lost to some dude who only had to win two games against me. He did so by banging away at the nine-ball. When I came back the next week, I was a 49. Never could figure that out.

The next time I decided to get myself into the system (about 2 years later... I played mostly in a very small 8-ball tournament in my local pool hall between USPPA memberships), they started me out at a 65, and I played like crap in the tournament (though, I won two matches). The next week I was an 82. I played a few tournaments at that speed (not too poorly, either... surprised myself).

This time, they started me at a 75 based on watching me warm up, but I played terribly in the tournament (hadn't played under pressure in about two years). Now, I'm a 68. Your assessment, however, matches my observations at House of Billiards. I guess getting established is the key.

Thank you and good to see you again, Tom_In_Cincy/SacTown. <hr /></blockquote>

tateuts
05-03-2004, 01:47 PM
Now, this is just in my own terms. I wouldn't put too much emphasis on the numbers, especially if someone has improved quickly. Here's what I've seen from a practical standpoint:

40- 50. Average intermediate player. Takes and gives a lot of chances, struggles with difficult shots and makes a lot of position errors.

50 - 80 Good intermediate player. Good shotmakers, decent position and safety skills. Will run out open tables.

80 - 100. Into the advanced player league. Strong players who play excellent shots, position, and safeties. Shortstop or near shortstops.

100 - 120 - established shortstop speed/semi pro.

120 - 130 Semi pro or pro speed.

130 plus - Pro speed

The rating can be well off for a variety of reasons. For example, someone who always plays tournaments on tight tables will be rated too low, as would someone who has improved rapidly.

Anyway, that's my take on it. The tournament directors, I have found, have usually been able to figure someones average better than the score sheets.

Chris