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Perk
05-04-2004, 06:13 AM
First, I have tried the search function, but all I get is a blank screen. So pardon me if its a very common answer.

What do you use to seal your shaft after burnishing? I cleaned my shaft last night using the 'Eraser' and it turned out really well. Now before I use it, I want to seal it properly. What do you recommend?

Thanks in advance!

mworkman
05-04-2004, 07:26 AM
I used the magic eraser also. Then I used Q-Slick and then Q-Glide. I'm sure there are cheaper alternatives tho'.

SpiderMan
05-04-2004, 07:30 AM
I use Kar-Seal Cue Wax. I think it's pure carnauba wax. I'm still waiting for the community to agree on what is the best semi-permanent sealer. The cue wax is easily stripped off with rubbing alcohol.

SpiderMan

mworkman
05-04-2004, 08:11 AM
How do you apply the wax? Is it liquid form? I'm invisoning a beeswax kind of texture.

stickman
05-04-2004, 08:51 AM
It's a paste wax. Rub it on, let it dry a little, and wipe it off.

Jim

Frank_Glenn
05-04-2004, 09:06 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mworkman:</font><hr> How do you apply the wax? Is it liquid form? I'm invisoning a beeswax kind of texture. <hr /></blockquote>

Bees wax is soft. Carnuba is very hard. These wax "products" are almost certainly not pure carnuba. For one thing it's expensive, for another it comes in a block and you need to spin the shaft up on a lathe and use a lot of heat to get it right. The car wax as described is wipe on/wipe off, so it is not pure carnuba. I like RainX, but YMMV.

Troy
05-04-2004, 09:35 AM
Most of my customers feel that "wax" ends up becoming sticky from hand oil, etc.,
and I agree with them.
After burnishing with un-dyed leather, I use a piece of wax paper, microwave for about 20-30 seconds, and spin the shaft in the lathe until I can really feel the heat on my fingers. This seems to do a fair job of "sealing" the shaft and there's not enough wax residue to become sticky.

Troy

stickman
05-04-2004, 09:46 AM
I use a commercial shaft sealer. I buy it from Cue Man Billiards Products. I love it, but some finish their shafts in different ways. Some would only use bare wood and burhish the shaft with leather. Some like to seal with leather burnishing and then a coat of wax. There are those that let their shafts build up a hard patina. They like to simply leather burnish. Yuck, it looks ugly, and what is that stuff made of? /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif There are other ways, to each their own. Once my shaft is perfectly clean, I like to polish with a sheet of 5 micron burnishing film. I then leather burnish. I take a small pad of cloth and dab the cloth with a small amount of the shaft sealer. I work quickly down the shaft applying a thin film with the cloth. The sealer dries within a minute or two, and can then be burnished with my 5 micron film. The result is a very highly polished effect, almost glassy. The sealer reminds me of a very light thin varnish, but isn't sticky. It is very thin. It protects the shaft against moisture, and helps avoid warpage. I seldom ever need to clean my shafts, they stay clean. I use a micro-fiber towel to keep my shaft clean. (no chalk, hand sweat, or what have you.) /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif The feel is similar to a fiberglass clad wooden shaft. I love it, but it's not for everyone. You can use a carnuba wax after sealing, but I prefer not to. The wax feels good initially, but my feeling is the wax tends to attract gunk and becomes sticky after a while. If you want to remove it, you need to carefully light sand with fine grit and sand only down to the wood.

Jim

SpiderMan
05-04-2004, 12:06 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mworkman:</font><hr> How do you apply the wax? Is it liquid form? I'm invisoning a beeswax kind of texture. <hr /></blockquote>

I'd say it's more like somewhere between beeswax and candle wax. It comes in a metal can like shoe polish, but it's not as soft as shoe polish.

To apply, I fold up a piece of paper towel, gouge a small amount from the can onto the paper, and rub it into the shaft while it's spinning in my crutch tool. After you spin it on, it will feel like you rubbed a crayon all over the shaft.

Then I use another folded paper towel, gripped tightly around the shaft, to "burn" the stuff into the wood surface while it's spinning. The result is a super-slick, glossy surface that somewhat resists dirt and chalk.

You can wipe it clean with a slightly-damp cloth (such as the "last" paper towel used to dry your hands in the john) and quickly burnish it back by rubbing with a dry one. About once every few weeks I remove the old wax with rubbing alcohol and start over.

Warning - always close the can of carnauba wax as soon as you dig some out. My guess is that it has a very small amount of solvent content to make it workable (smells slightly like mineral spirits), but it will eventually dry out to the point that it becomes crumbly and difficult to use.

SpiderMan

Phoenix2001
05-04-2004, 12:22 PM
I use the magic eraser and progressive grades of wet/dry 1000 thru 1800 and then saturate a piece of 2000 with lighter fluid to finish and seal the shaft...

Popcorn
05-04-2004, 02:15 PM
I would say the term sealer is misused as it applies to cue shafts. For the most part they will only make the shaft feel smoother and help them say clean, but do not provide any protection against the environment. When they are applied, they soak into the little fuzzies that have raised making them hard and brittle so they can be sheared off when you come back with some fine sand paper. Since they are now gone all together the shaft will stay smooth. Some sealer will find it's way into pores of the wood helping keep it clean. This all takes place on a microscopic level and to the eye and hand the shaft seems sealed. In reality it is about a impervious to moisture exchange as a screen door. Most finishes such as polyurethane, even in a built up solid coat, are not 100% protection to moisture exchange. The finish lays on the cue like microscopic spaghetti and moisture passes right through, yet it appears to be very solid. Finishes that dry in overlapping microscopic platelets provide the best protection. A product like you are using does work best as opposed to just wax or burnishing, since you are removing the raised fuzzies completely and not just pressing them back down, to just raise up again later. There are common products that will serve the same purpose such as a wipe with shellac or padding lacquer, then sand it off and polish with wax or what ever.

stickman
05-04-2004, 03:04 PM
Thanks for the detail, PC. When I first asked about the sealer, Chris told me the sealer was to help prevent warping. I suspect that if it is a well made shaft, and carefully cared for warping is a minimal risk. The big advantage in my opinion, is the slickness of the shaft and the ease of keeping it clean. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Chris Cass
05-06-2004, 08:22 AM
Hi Troy,

Do you also use this method for the linen wrap?

Regards,

C.C.

Troy
05-06-2004, 09:20 AM
Occasionally CC, it makes me nervous. And NOT generating anywhere near the same amount of heat, not "squeezing" as hard, and being sure I spin the butt in the same direction it was wrapped. ("With the grain" if you will... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif )

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chris Cass:</font><hr> Hi Troy,

Do you also use this method for the linen wrap?

Regards,

C.C. <hr /></blockquote>