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Wally_in_Cincy
05-06-2004, 10:41 AM
We get the 17-year cicadas this year. I bet SacTownTom_in_Cincy is sorry he is going to miss this.

Ask me any question about cicadas. I know all. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Wally~~has a 60-ft oak tree in his back yard /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Tom_In_Cincy
05-06-2004, 04:01 PM
I just missed them in 1987 when I moved there in Sept. And now in 2004, this is the closest to them I will be..

Question:

Has there ever been a time when the 17 year cycle has been broken?

Music at nite, splatted juices on the windshiled.

highsea
05-06-2004, 04:30 PM
They say we will get them here in Western Washington.

This guy likes them sauteed in butter and parsley. (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A16047-2004Apr15.html)

-CM~~~not that brave

Barbara
05-06-2004, 05:20 PM
Shelled or unshelled??

Barbara~~~yech!!!

Paul_Mon
05-07-2004, 04:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>
Ask me any question about cicadas. I know all. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

<hr /></blockquote>

Wally,
In any given area where there are Cicadas are they all on the same 17 year cycle?

Are Cicadas the locust that makes that loud noise, by rubbing there legs?

TIA.........Paul Mon

Wally_in_Cincy
05-07-2004, 06:31 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tom_In_Cincy:</font><hr>
Has there ever been a time when the 17 year cycle has been broken?. <hr /></blockquote>

No.

With cicadas being a srictly North American creature, they have only been noted in history as far back as around 1600. Since then this particular brood has been on a 17-year cycle.

Wally_in_Cincy
05-07-2004, 06:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Paul_Mon:</font><hr>... In any given area where there are Cicadas are they all on the same 17 year cycle?

<font color="blue">Not entirely. There is another smaller brood that will hatch next year around here. But it is quite small in comparison the this year's brood (Brood X...that's Roman numeral 10 BTW) </font color>

Are Cicadas the locust that makes that loud noise, by rubbing there legs?

<font color="blue">Yes. A very loud noise. Any large tree can produce 1000 cicadas. Only the males make the noise. 500 of them can produce quite a racket. In the Gretaer Cincinnati area they are expecting approx. 1 billion of them. When driving thru an area with estabilished trees I will be greeted by a cacophany. I would guess about 70 to 80 db, not that I know anything about that. </font color>

TIA.........Paul Mon <hr /></blockquote>

Wally_in_Cincy
05-07-2004, 06:43 AM
FYI

This the entomologist's theory.

The reason for the 17 year cycle is this. By only emerging every 17 years no natural predators have evolved that can rely on cicada consumption as a reliable food source.

Wally_in_Cincy
05-07-2004, 06:45 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote highsea:</font><hr> They say we will get them here in Western Washington.

This guy likes them sauteed in butter and parsley. (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A16047-2004Apr15.html)

-CM~~~not that brave <hr /></blockquote>

They say you have to get them right after they emerge from the ground and shed their hard shell. Before they grow a new one, while they are still tender.

Wally~~doesn't eat bugs /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

SPetty
05-07-2004, 07:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> Ask me any question about cicadas. I know all. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif<hr /></blockquote>Can you post a picture of one close up?

When we were kids, cicadas were green things that looked like leaves. Locusts were thumb-sized big headed things that left their crunchy skins behind when they shed. Grasshoppers were grasshoppers.

When I got older, I think I understood that people were calling grasshoppers locusts, and were calling locusts cicadas. But then what would the green leafy looking bugs be called?

Barbara
05-07-2004, 07:39 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> Can you post a picture of one close up?

When we were kids, cicadas were green things that looked like leaves.

<font color="blue">Perhaps you are referring to a praying mantis?</font color>

Locusts were thumb-sized big headed things that left their crunchy skins behind when they shed.

<font color="blue">These would be cicadas</font color>

Grasshoppers were grasshoppers.

When I got older, I think I understood that people were calling grasshoppers locusts, and were calling locusts cicadas. But then what would the green leafy looking bugs be called?
<hr /></blockquote>

Barbara

Wally_in_Cincy
05-07-2004, 07:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Barbara:</font><hr>Locusts were thumb-sized big headed things that left their crunchy skins behind when they shed.

<font color="blue">These would be cicadas</font color> <hr /></blockquote>

Barbara is correct. Folks around here used to call them locusts too. Down in Kentucky they called them jarflies. We would catch them and put them in a Mason jar and they would make all that racket.

I think the leafy green things are just a type of grasshopper but I am not an expert on grasshoppers, just cicadas.

Cicadas emerge when the ground temperature at 8 to 10 inches down hits 64 degrees F. I think it is 59 or 60 today. It's going to be a warm weekend. They could be coming out next week.

SPetty
05-07-2004, 09:21 AM
Here's a pic of a locust in Kentucky:
http://www.darklightimagery.net/newnature3/locust.jpg

So are all cicadas on a 17 year cycle? But they're not all on the same 17 year cycle? We have them every year, right? Just this year it'll be worse where you are? Or will it be worse for everyone?

(This'll be the last time Wally says "ask me anything about cicadas"!)

I think the green leafy things might be katydids? (Wonder what Katy did to get a bug named after her...)

Wally_in_Cincy
05-07-2004, 09:46 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr>
So are all cicadas on a 17 year cycle? But they're not all on the same 17 year cycle?

<font color="blue">No. Some are on 13-year, 7-year, or 5-year I believe. Their cycles are prime numbers. That is so the broods don't overlap very often.

For instance, the 13-year and the 17-year only overlap every 221 years.

This brood of 17-year cicadas is by far the largest. There may be some other 17-year broods but they are insignificant in comparison. </font color>

We have them every year, right?

<font color="blue">Not the multi-year broods. There is another species that is on a 1-year cycle but they are not as numerous as the multi-year cyle dudes. </font color>

Just this year it'll be worse where you are? Or will it be worse for everyone?

<font color="blue">I think it is widespread around the country. </font color>

(This'll be the last time Wally says "ask me anything about cicadas"!)

<font color="blue">That is entirely possible. </font color>

I think the green leafy things might be katydids? (Wonder what Katy did to get a bug named after her...)

<font color="blue">She bit her mate's head off after they fornicated. </font color> <hr /></blockquote>

Wally_in_Cincy
05-13-2004, 11:52 AM
They are coming. The ground is 65 degrees. They need a minimum of 64.

They like to wait until after a rain so the ground softens and they can burrow out. It rained today. As Neil Young sang, tonight's the night.

I dug up 4 of them while planting a bush Friday. They did not like being woken up early. I fed them to the robins that are nesting on my back yard floodlight under the soffit.

Paul_Mon
05-14-2004, 11:50 AM
Wally,
I've got a family of robins nesting in the trumpet vine on our front porch. I've tried a few times to peek inside but momma robin attacks me. Looks like she has at least three young ones in the nest. Check out the falcons on top of the Kodak tower at:

http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQuerier.jhtml?pq-path=2017/2033&amp;pq-locale=en_US&amp;_loopback=1

Paul Mon~~~for the birds

Barbara
05-14-2004, 12:06 PM
Paul,

We have an enclosed front porch that the cats have access to via the two living room windows that open out to it. We open the windows when the weather gets warm and they veg out there practically all day. When we first moved in I planted climbing rose bushes on both sides of the porch. This spring a robin decided to build a nest in one of those bushes and the scolding it gives the cats is really something. It's going to be a noisy summer.


Barbara~~~location, location, location...

Wally_in_Cincy
05-14-2004, 12:19 PM
I like the Falcon-cam /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Usually the mama robins will bark at you if you get too near and scare them off the nest but this one just flies over to the fence and waits for me to leave. I noticed her yesterday bringing food to the nest so at least one of them must have hatched.

Paul, I mowed my backyard in shifts because the mower scares her off the nest. It wasn't so bad.

Mow 5 minutes

drink a beer

Mow 5 minutes

drink a beer

etc. LOL

Paul_Mon
05-16-2004, 02:52 PM
Barbara,
Our 15 year old cat is crippled in one of his hind legs. I ran him over by accident on the same day the Lady Diane was killed. He's a great cat, a real hunter, in his younger days he would bring home and eat entire rabbits. His best days being behind him and using at least 7 of his 9 lives his hunting days are few and far between.

Well this morning while retrieving the Sunady paper I notice that the robins near the porch are going crazy. Looks like they're attacking their own nest! Our cat is in the nest with one of the babies. I felt terrible for the birds but left the situation to unfold by itself. I'm glad that I did. The cat had an extremely hard time getting down. I think that he will not bother climbing the vine again for the remaining 2 babies.

Paul Mon

TomBrooklyn
05-17-2004, 03:51 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> Here's a pic of a locust in Kentucky:<hr /></blockquote>I thought that was Kentucky.

SpiderMan
05-17-2004, 04:12 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr>
So are all cicadas on a 17 year cycle? But they're not all on the same 17 year cycle?

This brood of 17-year cicadas is by far the largest. There may be some other 17-year broods but they are insignificant in comparison. </font color> <hr /></blockquote>

Wally,

I don't think you directly answered the question, and it's one I'm wondering about also. Are the "main" 17-year cicadas coming out this year all over the world?

SpiderMan

Sid_Vicious
05-17-2004, 08:16 PM
Sugar coat or sautee, like a lobster tail or Barb's famous nuts, and offer it to Spiderman for free(or damn cheap), like Micky "He'll eat anything basically free!" sid~~~waiting for Spidey's taste review, and yet "if SPetty will" I'll try one with The Spiderman at the same time, as a CCB dare

Wally_in_Cincy
05-18-2004, 06:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr>
So are all cicadas on a 17 year cycle? But they're not all on the same 17 year cycle?

This brood of 17-year cicadas is by far the largest. There may be some other 17-year broods but they are insignificant in comparison. </font color> <hr /></blockquote>

Wally,

I don't think you directly answered the question, and it's one I'm wondering about also. Are the "main" 17-year cicadas coming out this year all over the world?

SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>

No. Just in this region.

The area this brood covers is generally Western Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, parts of TN and IL, as well as a section of VA.

I guess you could call this the "main" brood since it is probly 1000 times larger than any other 17-year brood.

The cicadas come out in such overwhelming numbers that the predators can not possibly eat them all. Kinda like minnows or sea turtles. They say there will be 5 billion in the Cincy/Hamiltucky Metroplex alone.

FWIW I have yet to see one /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif. We had cool weather this weekend. I know it's not a hoax because I remeber 1987 very well.

Next question please.

SPetty
05-18-2004, 11:25 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr>...a CCB dare...<hr /></blockquote>You're talking about eating bugs, right? Um, no thanks - not on purpose anyway /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif.

Of course, anything tastes good beer battered and deep fried and dipped in ranch dressing, right? (I mean if they can make okra and squash taste good fixed that way...)

Rich R.
05-18-2004, 11:43 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> The area this brood covers is generally Western Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, parts of TN and IL, as well as a section of VA.<hr /></blockquote>
They are in Maryland too. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Wally_in_Cincy
05-18-2004, 11:50 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> The area this brood covers is generally Western Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, parts of TN and IL, as well as a section of VA.<hr /></blockquote>
They are in Maryland too. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Have they emerged?

There are reports of emergence at points south of Hamiltucky but none in my 'hood as of yet.

Some folks has their young trees wrapped in cheesecloth. I think that may do more damage than the silly bugs.

Wally~~amateur gardener once again.....

Wally_in_Cincy
05-18-2004, 11:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr>...a CCB dare <hr /></blockquote>

whaddaya nuts?

Actually a local yokel ate several of them on a whim and had an allergic reaction similar to a peanut allergy.

pooltchr
05-18-2004, 01:30 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>Actually a local yokel ate several of them on a whim and had an allergic reaction similar to a peanut allergy. <hr /></blockquote>

Far be it from me to question ANYONE that knows all about anything, but from what I hear, people who have allergies to shellfish are the ones that should avoid this "delicacy".(sp)

Steve ---thinks road kill sounds more appitizing! (but then, I do live in the south!!!) /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Tom_In_Cincy
05-18-2004, 04:59 PM
From the Tullahoma TN newspaper

you can read this story HERE (http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1614&amp;dept_id=161052&amp;newsid=11711345&amp;P AG=461&amp;rfi=9)

[ QUOTE ]

While the 17-year-cicadas will be gone by July, that's about the time for another brood of cicadas, commonly known as the "dog day" cicadas, to emerge so this year will be a "double dose" of the insect that entomologists call, the most fascinating genus on earth. <hr /></blockquote>

Rich R.
05-19-2004, 08:02 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> Have they emerged?<hr /></blockquote>
They have started emerging and it will continue, according to the local news, for approximately six weeks.
We haven't had any in our yard, yet. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

UWPoolGod
05-19-2004, 09:44 AM
I read somewhere today that a guy went to the hospital with hives all over his body cause he didn't know he was allergic to the cicadas he had caught, fried in butter/basil and ate. Somebody get that guy a $1 McChicken Sandwich..geez.

Wally_in_Cincy
05-21-2004, 07:07 AM
They started emerging Wednesday night. Thursday morning there were about 200 empty exoskeletons on my oak tree. This morning there were, no kidding, at least 2000. On one 40-ft oak.

After we got home from pool last night we went out with a flashlight and watched them molt. Weird.

SPetty
05-21-2004, 07:15 AM
Hi Wally,

Can you get some pictures of your front yard? That would be interesting.

Wally_in_Cincy
05-21-2004, 07:40 AM
I have had a cheap digital camera for a year and still have not been able to off-load the pics from it.

but that's another thread /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Wally~~pathetic....

Wally_in_Cincy
06-07-2004, 08:26 AM
They were starting to wind down until yesterday. It was rather warm and they were quite active. My grandson was trying to eat them. I had 3 fly in my truck window at one stop light. I drove over 100 miles and splattered about 200 of them. In some heavily infested areas you can hit one every 200 yards or so.

I estimated there were about 5000 to 10000 that emerged from beneath my oak tree, probly more actually. The birds just gorge themselves. The normal fruits that are usually eaten by the birds, mulberries and such, go untouched.

They attacked me when I was mowing grass. They think the mower engine is a potential mate apparently.

It is not uncommon to see homeowners and shopkeepers emerge from their front doors and toss out a stray cicada that wandered in either by flying or attached to clothing.

They stink when they die and rot because there are so many of them. Imagine that. When's the last time you could smell insects rotting?

The owner of the pool hall used a decibel meter in his back yard. It registered 82 db. The older neighborhoods with estabilished trees are the worst. And of course the parks and woodlands too.

The golfers had to fight them at the Memorial in Dublin OH over the weekend.