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haywood
05-14-2004, 02:00 AM
I have been looking at different exotic woods online and was wondering if I could get some opinions as to what sorts of rare woods would look good as part of cues. I saw a piece of "cinnamon burl" on eBay and thought it looked pretty good. The color resembled that of Pink Ivory, but with a burl grain. Any thoughts from the cue-makers and/or other folks as to how this and other woods might look or feel on a cue?

Jimmy B
05-14-2004, 02:26 AM
All types of woods can look good, but you also need to take into account how they will perform. Burls are great as inlays or if they are cored, but I wouldn't want a solid burl forearm. You need to know how the woods react and how the work first then go for a piece of strange.

JB

Chris Cass
05-14-2004, 06:48 AM
Hi Jimmy,

If I might add the weight is a key thing too. I hear that ebony is a heavy wood.

Regards,

C.C.

Pizza Bob
05-14-2004, 08:47 AM
You also need to factor in how they "glue-up" and accept finish. Some of the real exotics have very high oil content, which can be a problem. Also some can produce toxic sawdust when being worked. The scope of woods you can use has increased with the advent of coring. Previously unusable woods - due to weight or stability characteristics, may now be cored. Your best bet is to get a cuemaker you're comfortable with and work with him on wood selection. Just my $.02 worth.

Adios,

Pizza Bob

UWPoolGod
05-14-2004, 08:55 AM
A guy I know had a cue made by Bobby Hunter. The wood was from a gnarled piece of ancient wood he found in Arizona while riding his bike. Supposedly it took Hunter a few blades to cut through this stuff. It is a nice looking wood though. An ancient Birdseye Maple I believe.

Keith Talent
05-14-2004, 02:23 PM
Speaking of Western wood ... anybody ever use ironwood in a cue? Too heavy, maybe? Wonder how it would play.

justbrake
05-14-2004, 05:33 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Jimmy B:</font><hr> All types of woods can look good, but you also need to take into account how they will perform. Burls are great as inlays or if they are cored, but I wouldn't want a solid burl forearm. You need to know how the woods react and how the work first then go for a piece of strange.

JB
<hr /></blockquote>

I have been looking at all the cue's on ebay and cue site's and see alot of different forearms made with different woods and I have see some post here and what they(members)say they are looking for something like a certin wood and certin forarms made buy certin cue makers,so what is the prefered forearm!
how would look for a cue's forearm, is it in the grain,weight,hardness,age,etc.or is it the reputation of a cue makers wood!

Jimmy B
05-14-2004, 08:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote justbrake:</font><hr> so what is the prefered forearm!
how would look for a cue's forearm, is it in the grain,weight,hardness,age,etc.or is it the reputation of a cue makers wood! <hr /></blockquote>
I like straight grain woods, I also like a forward balanced cue so to me the best woods are Purpleheart and Ebony, you don't see Purpleheart warp a lot because it's very stable. Birdseye is prolly the most popular wood used and can look great when it's highly figured and lightly stained. The rest is really up to what you like personally, it's all about looks. Any GOOD cuemaker will not use any wood that would be bad for the cue, if he did he wouldn't be doing it for long.

JB

Alvin
05-16-2004, 09:21 AM
How about Tindalo wood. Like on Eferens cue.This wood is illegal. Ropey Bubinga is rare as well.

Cueless Joey
05-16-2004, 09:28 AM
ropey (http://azbilliards.com/vbulletin/upload/attachment.php?attachmentid=1811&amp;stc=1) Yup. .
Two on the right are mine.