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View Full Version : Video taping your game



nAz
05-26-2004, 10:22 AM
I have been thinking of doing this for over a year now and I finally plan on getting it done next week. since I will likely be alone I was wondering if anyone has any suggestions as to where I should place the camera and what type of shots should I take so I can review all my glaring mistakes I may have in my stroke. /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

BTW Has this actually helped anyones game, it seems to do wonders for players in other sports.

pooltchr
05-26-2004, 10:30 AM
Set your camera up at one end of the table and make sure you can see at least half of the table as well as about 4 feet on the side. Set it so your stroke arm is on the side where the camera is. Set up several shots, different speed and spin straight into the other side pocket. Then come to the end in front of the camera and shoot several shots into the far corner on the same side of the table...then switch ends. This will give you a good view of the side of your stroke to look for elbow drop, bridge placement, finish (follow through for those who haven't been through school). The view from behind will let you see if your arm is staying straight up and down, or moving in or out during your stroke. When you are shooting toward the camera, you can check your head and shoulders and overall alignment.
Now all you have to know is what to look for... /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif
Good luck!
Steve

PQQLK9
05-26-2004, 10:36 AM
Be sure to comb your hair and wear clean clothes... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Chris Cass
05-26-2004, 10:40 AM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Rod
05-26-2004, 10:55 AM
Agreed, front, back and side. Shoot shots that are easy, and easy at first but do use top, center, draw and spin. Then do the same except make them a little more difficult. The final ones make testy. If you have real problems it will show up even on easy strokes but if not it will show up on more difficult shots. Now all you need is trained eyes, like Steve said.

Rod

Scott Lee
05-26-2004, 10:55 AM
I agree with Steve, that multiple camera angles are necessary to spot flaws and/or problems. I would suggest head on, straight behind, and both sides. Set a series of 10-12 shots, and shoot them EXACTLY the same way, for each of the four camera angles. This should give you a very strong reference for your fundamentals and mechanics. I have often videotaped my students while they play, as well. This allows them to see themselves in actual game-playing sequences, where they are supposedly shooting with their 'natural' methods.

Scott Lee

Popcorn
05-26-2004, 11:02 AM
Just set up the camera and play for like an hour. don't play to the camera. Two things can be accomplished with a tape of your game. One is you may see a problem you may want to work on. The second, and most important thing in my opinion is. You get mental practice just watching your self play. If you edit the tape to catch yourself playing at your best, then watch it before you go to play, you will be in stroke almost immediately. To your mind it is almost like a real practice session. It works, believe me.

9 Ball Girl
05-26-2004, 11:05 AM
I think a great introduction to your video tape is your 5 ball juggling act.../ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif

When are you going to do it. Maybe I can be your camera girl. /ccboard/images/graemlins/ooo.gif

Predator314
05-26-2004, 11:42 AM
I would think having another person running the camera would be helpful. This will allow you to shoot pool and not worry about taping.

.... Also a little pr0n music in the background would be neat /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Bow-chika-bowwow

9 Ball Girl
05-26-2004, 12:10 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Predator314:</font><hr> .... Also a little pr0n music in the background would be neat /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Bow-chika-bowwow <hr /></blockquote>Don't you just love those? Especially with the camera flashes going on in the background. Teehee.

Seriously though, nAzareth, if you want, I can tape you.

SpiderMan
05-26-2004, 12:38 PM
I spent several days doing exactly this, earlier this year.

Camera location and alignment is critical if you want to actually capture any crookedness in your stroke. Stretch a string to get a straight line from cueball to corner pocket. Use a couple of gummed reinforcing rings (sold in office supply stores) to mark spots on the line to locate the cueball and object ball. Then set up the camera EXACTLY on this line.

If your camera is off-line, the perspective will make your stroke appear to loop sideways even when it's perfect.

Shoot a bunch of straight-in shots with the camera on this line from in front as well as from behind. You'll easily pick up on the little stroking flaws.

SpiderMan

Popcorn
05-26-2004, 12:43 PM
Did it help, or did it just make you nuts? Some people, even some good players, maybe should not see themselves shoot. It can be like recording your voice, you may not like what you see, even if there is nothing wrong.

Ross
05-26-2004, 01:20 PM
I agree with Popcorn that you should also include "playing footage," not just "stroke footage." Set the camera up far enough away that it will capture you moving around the table. You may discover traits like: changing your preshot routine as you get toward the end of a rack, bending down over a shot before you've really looked at it, rushing your backswing on pressure shots, etc. These pressure and pacing issues can mess up our run-outs yet not show up when shooting a particular shot repeatedly. Both types of feedback are obviously important.

Predator314
05-26-2004, 02:35 PM
I think videotape of you actually playing, not practicing is going to give you a better idea. I don't know about you folks, but when I'm practicing, I focus on the fundamentals (head down, the stroke, etc). When I'm playing, I tend to stray from those fundamentals. You can see which fundamentals you stray from and then work on them in a practice session to "burn" those fundamentals into your brain and stroke.

tateuts
05-26-2004, 03:28 PM
I videotaped myself playing 9 ball from the break. I got two benefits from it, both of which were unexpected.

1) I found that being filmed puts added pressure to perform well for the camera (for yourself). So, in a way, it simulates playing before an audience - which is good training for that big day on ESPN 2. Don't rewind!

2) The second benefit was that I could see the actual pace of my own movement and set-up as I went from shot to shot - which was different than it seems like when I'm actually playing. Since I looked like I was rushing a little on film, I used this to slow myself down and get set up better before each shot.

Chris

Qtec
05-26-2004, 06:09 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> Did it help, or did it just make you nuts? /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif Some people, even some good players, maybe should not see themselves shoot. It can be like recording your voice, you may not like what you see, even if there is nothing wrong. <hr /></blockquote>


I agree totally Popcorn. Its one thing to spot a fault in your stroke/stance etc, but its something else to isolate the cause and correct it.
Thats why there are pool instructors!

Qtec

nAz
05-26-2004, 07:40 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 9 Ball Girl:</font><hr> I think a great introduction to your video tape is your 5 ball juggling act...:o

When are you going to do it. Maybe I can be your camera girl. /ccboard/images/graemlins/ooo.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Juggling act is what im famous for. I'll let you know about the the taping thingy.

nAz
05-26-2004, 08:08 PM
Thank you all for all the input, it has given me many things to think about and now i am confident that the video will all come together and be very helpful to me. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Couple of things i to was thinking that it maybe best to have someone tape me playing a match maybe at my local Tourney, just hope that my opponent will be all right with it. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

I will still do it shooting practice shots with both front and back angles. i really want to check out my back swing when i take a really hard stroke, I like most D- players miss many shots when i shot hard. /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif

Ya Popcorn i wonder about how i will play knowing that the camera is on me, i feel that i will take my time on every shot and check my pre shot routing every time, and that is not what i do normally.

Maybe after i finish this project i will find a site to host it and everyone here can critique it. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif (scott /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif)

stickman
05-26-2004, 09:24 PM
Hi Scott. I just watched my tapes for the first time in over two years. The tapes survived the divorce, but I didn't get a VCR. I just bought another one yesterday at a pawn shop. It was fun to watch it again. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Rod
05-26-2004, 10:14 PM
Hi Jim,

What were you doing wrong? To go a step farther did you correct a problem? Just asking, glad to see you once in a while. How's the new and well er old pool room doing?

Rod

stickman
05-26-2004, 10:54 PM
A number things. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif It was my first lesson from Scott. The new poolhall is doing well. It is still clean and well managed. He is a little down with the warm weather and longer nights. This will be his first summer to own it. Some folks have other things to do in the summer, unlike us hardcore pool addicts. The old hall is the same old mess, only worse. It is full of young kids playing free pool with little supervision. I don't know how they stay open. I think a backer keeps it up for some reason. There's lots of trouble in there. I suspect that the backer has it open to hurt the new owner's business. The people attracted to the old hall don't hurt the new one's business. He doesn't want that type here anyway. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

stickman
05-26-2004, 11:03 PM
Rod everytime I open one of your posts a little icon shows up at the bottom of the screen. If I put the mouse over the icon, it says "privacy report". What's up?

bigbro6060
05-27-2004, 12:23 AM
Videotape your stroke from EVERY angle, from both sides, from behind and from the front

it is amazing what you can pick up from the video

as for the shots, play a variety of shots and CALL OUT to the camera before each shot what you are attempting (e.g. long straight draw shot)

Definitely do some power shots because flaws in your technique are magnified when you try to use more power

SpiderMan
05-27-2004, 11:26 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> Did it help, or did it just make you nuts? Some people, even some good players, maybe should not see themselves shoot. It can be like recording your voice, you may not like what you see, even if there is nothing wrong. <hr /></blockquote>

The first time, it made me nuts because I didn't have the camera exactly on line with the shot. In that case, the tape looked as if I were swerving my cue when it looked straight from my own perspective.

After I got the camera set up properly and shot long enough to stop thinking about it, I think it actually helped me see little things like not having a straight follow-through and twisting my wrist a couple of times. Taping from behind also made me more conscious of when my forearm was not vertical, and how that is affected by moving my stance a little bit one way or the other.

I did those experiments for the camera while announcing what I was trying, so that it would make sense when I viewed it later. I've already forgotten some of what I learned, so it would probably help to do it again soon.

SpiderMan