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k_town
06-04-2004, 03:39 PM
hey everyone
i was wondering about the grip u should use on the break... they say to hold the cue lightly with your thumb & 1st 2 fingers on normal shots ....is it da same on breaks??

Popcorn
06-04-2004, 05:05 PM
I don't know who they are, but I hold the cue mostly with my second and third fingers and my first finger may or may not even touch the cue at all. On the break I don't change my gripe, I do hold it lite though and may use a little tightening as I follow through producing a snap.

Chris Cass
06-04-2004, 05:13 PM
Tap, Tap, Tap.

Well, a question is a question. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Regards,

C.C.

Chris Cass
06-04-2004, 05:16 PM
Hi K-Town,

Here's what I do. I start out with a death grip on the cue. I stand about 4 ft from the table and take a running start and wack that thing from here to Sunday. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Regards,

C.C.~~Happy Gilmore /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

#### leonard
06-05-2004, 07:43 AM
Chris years ago on a road trip with Joe Canton we ended up in Canada in a snooker room. There I had to pleasure of watching the strangest shooter I have ever seen play.

He would approach the table with his grip and bridge hand in place on the cue and lower his bridge hand to the table as soon as his bridge hand touched the table he would hit the cueball and continuing with the flow thru bring the cue back off the table. He was at the table no more than one second a shot. ####

Chris Cass
06-05-2004, 07:47 AM
Hi ####,

I've been reading your stuff every chance I can lately. I was only kidding on my post but I met a guy once that broke one handed and he'd break harder than anyone I've ever seen. Johnny Archer included. Timing and speed is the whole key and I use a light grip. IMHO

Regards,

C.C.

#### leonard
06-05-2004, 10:48 AM
Chris that fellow who I knew who put all nineballs in on the break defied explanation of how he did break nineballs. Slight of build and no violent striking of the cueball but the noise he created was amazing and the balls seemed to speed up off the rails.####

nhp
06-05-2004, 01:35 PM
I read about this guy who studied the "art of breaking", where they break very tough objects using their " inner chi" or something like that. This one guy, was able to shatter a cocoanut tied to a rope and hanging from a tree. He did it using the palm of his hand. It wasn't pressed up against anything, it was just hanging in mid air. This guy literally destroyed the thing. I suppose if people can do things like that, someone can break the balls well with one hand.

The method I use for breaking (when I am breaking well) is I keep a lose grip, and just throw the cue at the cueball MAKING SURE I don't tense up any muscles in my arm. Tension of muscles will cause you to lose alot of power, IMO. Also, if you're breaking from the side rail, instead of following through up in the air, follow through down into the cloth for the break. Notice most of the pros do this, some of them to the extent that their shaft bends on the cloth. Using this downward motion makes you slightly jacked up on the ball, which gets the CB to pop up after it hits the rack. Good luck

Leviathan
06-05-2004, 03:02 PM
'Lo, Leonard. Do you recall whether this guy took any special pains with racking when racked for himself ( if he racked for himself)?

AS

Chris Cass
06-05-2004, 06:11 PM
Hi Alan,

It's all timing. Just like in karate. My best breaks come with little or no grip feeling and yet when I feel the grip that's when I mess up. Heck, I never had a break to begin with but I've seen some powerful stuff and it amazes me.

Regards,

C.C.

shooter72283
06-06-2004, 02:23 AM
I break in what I will now refer to as "Jeet Kun Do" style. If you know anything about this martial art that was pioneered by Bruce Lee, you know that the hand is kept fairly open and loose until just before contact, when it tightens up rapidly and thus procuces a tremendous amount of extra power. When I break, I take all of my practice strokes with a hand (fingers 1-3, usually 1st finger only touching at the end of the backstroke) that is very loose, and on the actual stroke I tighten up my hand and muscles almost simultaneously with contact of the cueball. I also try to put a little "carabo" backspin on the cue, meaning that my practice strokes are at dead center, but when I hit the cueball, I move the tip of the cue downward into the table, producing enough backspin to keep it in the center of the table after contact. Usually works to my advantage, even though I still break with a house cue. Once I buy the Phillipi, I'll convert my sneaky pete into a break cue, which may require a new approach, but I'll cross that bridge when I get to it.
I am a little guy (only weigh 140 and am skinny as a twig), but this method gives me a better break than guys I know who are all muscle and weigh 250, it's all about knowing how to focus the maximun amount of energy into the smallest amount of space possible while still maintaining control. Watch Bustamante break, he will show you something.

bluewolf
06-06-2004, 06:39 AM
Still working on the break. I split the balls pretty good and sometimes something drops. I use a light grip, the same as when I shoot, attempting to line up correctly and moving the cue through fast. Now the reason I say that I am still working on it is because I am learning to put body behind the break, sort of like a karate punch. I have not gotten this technique down yet, which, IMO, is why I have an OK break, rather than a very good one.

Always open to new ideas on this, however.

Laura---> the perpetual student

ceebee
06-06-2004, 05:35 PM
IMHO... the only amount of grip needed on the Pool Cue is enough to control the stroke of the Pool Cue. When the 18-20 ounce Pool Cue is stroked accurately through the a 6 ounce Cue Ball at an accelerating rate, you only need to have control of it, not a tight grip.

This motion is sometimes described as feeling almost nothing.

When either striking the Cue Ball inaccurately with the Pool Cue or seeing the Cue Ball miss the spot on the intended Object Ball in the rack, it's then that you feel the error.

Fred Agnir
06-06-2004, 07:05 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote shooter72283:</font><hr> I break in what I will now refer to as "Jeet Kun Do" style. If you know anything about this martial art that was pioneered by Bruce Lee, you know that the hand is kept fairly open and loose until just before contact, when it tightens up rapidly and thus procuces a tremendous amount of extra power. <hr /></blockquote>Probably prevents the cue from flying out of your hands more than anything else?

[ QUOTE ]
I also try to put a little "carabo" backspin on the cue, meaning that my practice strokes are at dead center, but when I hit the cueball, I move the tip of the cue downward into the table, producing enough backspin to keep it in the center of the table after contact. <hr /></blockquote>If you truly were putting backspin on the cueball on the break, it would rocket backwards towards the head of the table. Try your break with a striped ball (or a multi-dot ball) and report here if you're cueball is truly in backspin mode when it hits the rack (or after it hits the rack). My multi-dot cue ball tells me that the cueball squats onto the center of the table when the cueball has a touch of *follow* on it, not draw.

Fred

bluewolf
06-06-2004, 07:36 PM
Scott Lee told us that what people think is a little low is really center and demonstrated it for us.

Nice to see you, Fred.

Laura

Chris Cass
06-06-2004, 11:40 PM
Your so right Charlie. I once broke and I held the cue too light. The thing went straight out and never came back. Everyone was stunned but not as stunned as I. Thank God I break with a house cue.

Regards,

C.C.~~ /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

#### leonard
06-07-2004, 06:47 AM
I never heard of him practicing his breaks. I once racked balls for him for three hours to see his break in action. He hadn't played in years when he gave my his demo. Joe Canton always said if he could break like Andy no one would beat him playing nineball.

He wasn't a player of sorts, he was a wanderer, a jack of all trades.

The best local story of him was once when he was leaving the poolroom, the houseman asked him to bring him back tea and toast. He said he would and six months later he came back with his tea and toast. ####

Scott Lee
06-07-2004, 12:40 PM
Laura is correct. Most people "see" center on the CB as higher than it really is. This is a perceptual error, and is easily corrected. BTW, loose grip all the time, imo...breaks included!

Scott Lee

Rod
06-07-2004, 06:39 PM
The old two step routine eh? There was a player here, very good I might add, that broke with his head turned. I'm not sure how long that lasted but he said he hit the balls more square. He couldn't looking at them, you never know.

~~rod, has yet to try that approach

Chris Cass
06-07-2004, 10:31 PM
Hi Rod,

There's a guy I know that breaks really strong. He ends up with one leg on the table as if he was ready to climb up on the rack. LOL What ever works. Man, he'll break your eardrums.

Regards,

C.C.