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The_New_Guy
06-08-2004, 06:20 AM
Hello everyone. I have been here lurking for a few months. Lots of good info on this site. You guys/gals have helped me purchase my first table, and cue without even knowing it. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

I got my table 2 weeks ago, and love it. It is an Olhausen Americana 8'. I also purchased a Pechauer JP-01 cue. I am really enjoying them both.

A little background info about myself. I am 25 years old, and married. I played pool when I was about 14, for 2-3 years, and have played a little here and there from then until now. I was never serious about it however. Always just banging balls. I have just recently decided to try to better myself, and my game. I have been reading, and learning here, quite a bit.

Since recieving my table, I have been playing from 2-6 hours daily, and start to get a little frustrated at times. I guess my first question is, how long should I expect to play, on this schedule, before I begin to see any real improvements in my game? I don't really do any drills, to speak of, I usually just throw all the balls on the table, and try to run one side of the balls, then the other. Trying to pay attention to cue ball placement as much as possible. Any suggestions for a beginner?

Thanx for taking time to read my post, and I look forward to hearing your responses/suggestions. /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

Predator314
06-08-2004, 06:29 AM
When you're putting that kind of time in, it won't take long to see improvements as long as you don't get burnt out.

Some things you might want to do:

o Play against some people, don't always play by yourself. This is the easiest way to notice you're improving. It's not always noticeable when playing by yourself.

o Set aside some time for drills. There are some great ones drills on the internet. One book that I can definitely recommend is Black Belt Billiards (http://members.aol.com/blkbeltbilliards). DoctorD's book looks pretty good too! It's huge! 1500 Pages. The Billiards Workbook (http://www.billiardsworkbook.com/)

o While practicing make sure you focus on the fundamentals

o Have fun!

The_New_Guy
06-08-2004, 06:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Predator314:</font><hr> When you're putting that kind of time in, it won't take long to see improvements as long as you don't get burnt out.

Some things you might want to do:

o Play against some people, don't always play by yourself. This is the easiest way to notice you're improving. It's not always noticeable when playing by yourself.
<font color="blue"> I do play others, sorry if I forgot to mention that. My wife is my usual opponenet, with a few friends here and there. I would say 30% of my time is alone. Although, I do find it easier to concentrate on my game, when playing alone. </font color>


o Set aside some time for drills. There are some great ones drills on the internet. One book that I can definitely recommend is Black Belt Billiards (http://members.aol.com/blkbeltbilliards). DoctorD's book looks pretty good too! It's huge! 1500 Pages. The Billiards Workbook (http://www.billiardsworkbook.com/)
<font color="blue">I will look into these books, thank you for the suggestions. </font color>

o While practicing make sure you focus on the fundamentals
<font color="blue">Meaning my stroke, and keeping everything in line from the cue, all the way back to my elbow, and my bridge, etc? </font color>

o Have fun! <hr /></blockquote>

Thank you for your post, I greatly appreciate any advice I can get. At times it is tough to not get burnt out. Sometimes I find myself missing the easiest of shots.

Frank_Glenn
06-08-2004, 08:11 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote The_New_Guy:</font><hr>

Since recieving my table, I have been playing from 2-6 hours daily, and start to get a little frustrated at times. I guess my first question is, how long should I expect to play, on this schedule, before I begin to see any real improvements in my game? I don't really do any drills, to speak of, I usually just throw all the balls on the table, and try to run one side of the balls, then the other. Trying to pay attention to cue ball placement as much as possible. Any suggestions for a beginner?
<hr /></blockquote>

It's important to shoot drills that you can keep records of. How else will you know if you are improving. Play equal offense or some other game you can play by yourself and keep score. Play progressive drills and try to get to the harder end of the drills. Keep records. Play in local tournaments and keep records of how you do. Good luck, and enjoy.

PS get a lesson for a BCA cerified instructor. This will give you a good platform to improve from and go a long way in helping you.

Steve Lipsky
06-08-2004, 11:45 AM
Welcome to the board. I would suggest you spend some time at the local poolroom and watch/play the better shooters.

Without exposure to better players, it is difficult to dramatically improve your game. Watch their patterns and positional routes, mostly. These are the areas you'll be able to immediately begin work on when you get back to your home table.

Just out of curiosity, at what level do you think you play now?

- Steve

The_New_Guy
06-08-2004, 04:13 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Steve Lipsky:</font><hr> Welcome to the board. I would suggest you spend some time at the local poolroom and watch/play the better shooters.

Without exposure to better players, it is difficult to dramatically improve your game. Watch their patterns and positional routes, mostly. These are the areas you'll be able to immediately begin work on when you get back to your home table.

Just out of curiosity, at what level do you think you play now?

- Steve <hr /></blockquote>
Thanx for the advice. I would love to watch/play with better players, but I do not really know where to look. The only pool tables that I know of near me, are at a local bowling alley. There is usually noone there when I go in. I suppose I should go out, and search around a little more, as I have not looked very hard into it. As for what level I am at, I do not know how I would gauge that. I am not very good at all. if I can run 3-4 balls in a game, I am doing well. I understand quite a bit of the fundamentals, and have learned a lot more from reading here, I just have trouble puting it to work when I am at the table.

The_New_Guy
06-08-2004, 04:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Frank_Glenn:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote The_New_Guy:</font><hr>

Since recieving my table, I have been playing from 2-6 hours daily, and start to get a little frustrated at times. I guess my first question is, how long should I expect to play, on this schedule, before I begin to see any real improvements in my game? I don't really do any drills, to speak of, I usually just throw all the balls on the table, and try to run one side of the balls, then the other. Trying to pay attention to cue ball placement as much as possible. Any suggestions for a beginner?
<hr /></blockquote>

It's important to shoot drills that you can keep records of. How else will you know if you are improving. Play equal offense or some other game you can play by yourself and keep score. Play progressive drills and try to get to the harder end of the drills. Keep records. Play in local tournaments and keep records of how you do. Good luck, and enjoy.

PS get a lesson for a BCA cerified instructor. This will give you a good platform to improve from and go a long way in helping you. <hr /></blockquote>
What is equal offense? And, could you give me an example of a progressive drill? I have the wei table saved in my favorites, so feel free to use that if necessary. As for getting instruction from a bca cert instructor, I was under the impression that I should wait until my game develops a little more before spending the $ involved in that. Am I wrong?
BTW, thanx for your input, it is greatly appreciated. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Frank_Glenn
06-08-2004, 06:29 PM
[ QUOTE ]
What is equal offense? And, could you give me an example of a progressive drill? I have the wei table saved in my favorites, so feel free to use that if necessary. As for getting instruction from a bca cert instructor, I was under the impression that I should wait until my game develops a little more before spending the $ involved in that. Am I wrong?
BTW, thanx for your input, it is greatly appreciated. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif <hr /></blockquote>

EO is in the BCA rule Book but not the online rules. Basically smash break a 15 ball rack, spot anything you made on the break, take ball in hand behind the head string and run as many balls as you can leaving one still on the table. Rack the other 14 (like straight pool), shoot in the one left and break open the rack and try to get a total of 20 balls. Do this 10 times and add your scores. A perfect score would be 200. A Pro will make 150 or better. It's basically straight bool to 20 by yourself. If you miss or scratch, the inning is over. Rack all 15 and start new. 10 innings is a game.

Progressive drlls can be found on sfbilliards.com, easypooltutor.com, and other places. My website has a link to about 600 or so other pool sites. It's in my sig line.

You cannot get an instructor too soon, IMO and it it $$$ well spent.

Bob_Jewett
06-08-2004, 07:48 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote The_New_Guy:</font><hr> Thanx for the advice. I would love to watch/play with better players, but I do not really know where to look. The only pool tables that I know of near me, are at a local bowling alley.<hr /></blockquote>
I see from your info that you're in San Diego. Try College Billiards on El Cajon. Or, I went to google and found a site that says
"Pocket Billiards
Tournaments in San Diego
8 Ball and 9 Ball"
which lists tournaments somewhere in/near San Diego for every night of the week.

For books, start with Robert Byrne and Phil Capelle. If you absorb (and can put into practice) the info even in their "beginning" books ("New Standard Book of Pool and Billiards" and "Play Your Best Pool", respectively) you will be in the top ten players in San Diego.

Some drills are in the free "Basics" clinic handout at the link below.

The_New_Guy
06-09-2004, 06:25 AM
Thanx for all the advice guys. I will have to try EO, and will definetly be making a trip to College billiards this week. I also ordered black belt billiards yesterday. Pool is such a great game. You can hate it one day, and be back to loving it the next. /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

bluewolf
06-09-2004, 07:45 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Frank_Glenn:</font><hr>

It's important to shoot drills that you can keep records of. How else will you know if you are improving. Play equal offense or some other game you can play by yourself and keep score.

PS get a lesson for a BCA cerified instructor. This will give you a good platform to improve from and go a long way in helping you. <hr /></blockquote>

I am not much of a drill person either. My shooting is coming along at an expected pace, my defense is good and I need to get better at shape.

The best way I have found to gage progress in this, while practicing is this. Although I play 8 ball in league, playing nine ball in practice helps me to see if I am getting better shape on subsequent shots, and can see if I am running more balls. It forces me to think more about position, plan what i should do position wize before going down on the shot. Like you said, playing the 'ghost'.

Sometimes I will do with ray, when he misses, then see how many balls I can get shape on and run.

Laura