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mred477
06-10-2004, 07:25 PM
Anyone who reads my posts would probably know I'm a Libertarian by now. As such, I have much faith in the free-market to correct the ills of society.

My question is really this: What is it about true capitalism that scares so many people? Data shows that excessive regulation only causes harm (and sometimes unintended consequences). I'm not a crazy libertarian who wants no government, but I do feel that personal responsibility is an important thing missing too often in this country right now. JMHO

Will

moblsv
06-13-2004, 02:02 PM
Your post seemed to take a couple different directions in the question so I hope this answer is to what I thought you asked.

I think of a Libertarian as somebody who believes in the smaller government, less economic intervention ideals of conservatism but also believes in the expansion of civil liberties ideals of the Liberals. This may not fit everybody's definition but it somewhat sums up my personal beliefs. One of the places I see confict in this is in allowing big business to run wild. Business and economic reward drive progress both technologically and economically. Especially when they are customer driven, that is, a need exists for a product or service and a business builds a plan to supply that product and makes money. The problem I have is when this shifts to being marketing and sales driven. Some companies gain too much control and lock up the market. They then focus on developing means to keep the consumer locked in to thier product and without competition innovation slows and consumers lose choice.

I guess the answer to your question is: I'm afraid of losing choice in my purchasing decisions.

If one company controls a market and there is no control what's to stop them from treating the consumer as a commodity and becomiong "big brotherish" tracking your every move and every purchase and selling it off to anyone who will pay for it. Now that we've gone this far, why not let the government have it.

If I don't like something a company is doing I want to be able to *choose* a different company.

As for 'personal responsibility' that is the first thing lost in big business. They are only responsible to the shareholders. My personal responsibility is to choose the company I want to give my money to. Again, if I think a company is being irresponsible to civil liberties, the environment, whatever, I want to have the choice to buy from somebody else.

landshark77
06-13-2004, 04:34 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote moblsv:</font><hr> One of the places I see confict in this is in allowing big business to run wild. Business and economic reward drive progress both technologically and economically. Especially when they are customer driven, that is, a need exists for a product or service and a business builds a plan to supply that product and makes money. The problem I have is when this shifts to being marketing and sales driven. Some companies gain too much control and lock up the market. They then focus on developing means to keep the consumer locked in to thier product and without competition innovation slows and consumers lose choice. <hr /></blockquote>

Nail on the head!

bluewolf
06-13-2004, 04:44 PM
tap tap

Laura

JPB
06-13-2004, 06:39 PM
"What is it about true capitalism that scares so many people?"

What scares so many people is their irrationality. True capitalism couldn't scare them because they don't know what it is, nor has it been tried. It is an anti-rational collectivist outlook that has been drilled into their heads from day one. Whether it is their parents using force on them in inappropriate situations to shut off their reason, bad moral training that falsely praises altruism, or taking little bromides at face value (things like "who am I to know" "nobody can know for sure" "awww, it's only human" etc....) most people have anti-rational things put in their heads from a young age. I know I did, and my parents aren't particularly bad; they certainly valued education and reason more than most parents. But I don't think they had a coherent enough view of the human mind or their world to avoid accidentally spouting irrational stuff. Anyway, on to the next point...


"As such, I have much faith in the free-market to correct the ills of society."


Your thinking is polluted with collectivist and anti rationalist thought here, at least if you really meant what you said in this sentence. If the free market works you do not need faith in it. Capitalists look at the individual, not society. "Faith" and "society" are things said by primitives, priests, communists or collectivists of all sorts, and philosophers who are anti-reason, or distrust reason. (Plato, Kant, modern guys)

It is good you are a libertarian, but there are some problems with libertarians when their outlook is not guided by a coherent philosophy. I think you would respond to Objectivism and might enjoy getting into it. What is really eye-opening is getting into it enough to look at the objectivist epistemolgy. Many libertarians are objectivists, but not all. All objectivists would be considered pretty libertarian, but are not anarchist by any means.

I don't mean to be insulting at all. I am only starting to pick through some of the beliefs I have picked up from not thinking critically enough. I have always advocated free markets and individual liberties, but have made mistakes in failing to think certain things through, or perhaps out of ignorance. Objectivist philosophy can help point out areas where these mistakes crop up.