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View Full Version : Eyes wide shut vs. eyes wide open



rukiddingme
06-26-2004, 05:10 AM
I went to the pool hall yesterday and I swear I just could not make a ball. I checked my glasses, my alignment, and my stroke.
I would aim and shootlong straight in shots several inches off short and long of the pocket. I checked my stroke, my alignment, cleaned my glasses all to no avail. I was so frustrated I thought a blind person can shoot better than this. I wondered if truly something was wrong with my aim and so I would aim, then CLOSE my eyes and shoot and the ball would go right in the middle of the pocket ( i know this by sound not sight...lol)
The long and short of it is I can make balls with my eyes shut but not open...lol.
WASSUP WITH THAT??? and what do I do to fix it???? (whatever IT is)
ruk

Popcorn
06-26-2004, 06:44 AM
What is your speed and how would you normally expect to play? I am being completely honest when I tell you, I never go to the pool room and can't make a ball. I don't care if I haven't played for months. I believe at a point that just shouldn't happen anymore. Some days are better the others but that's about it. The eyes closed thing I don't know what to say. The point is, nothing is probably different then it was the last time you played normally. Having a panic attach over missing a few balls doesn't help and may just make you play worse. I would forget about it, nothing probably needs fixing. I doubt you have forgotten how to play over night.

rukiddingme
06-26-2004, 07:36 AM
Yesterday was an absolute nightmare...
CC worked briefly with me last Sunday and I was jumping up a bit...and my bridge was giving me problems... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
Maybe when I close my eyes I'm more focused on executing a nice stroke and not re-aiming and stroking...if that makes any sense.
I generally do not have too much of a problem potting balls...my nemesis is cue ball control.
I am an APA 4 who can sometimes play at a high 5 level and sometimes play at a low 3 level...hence a 4.
I am going to take your suggestion and will attempt to absolutely DELETE yesterday's experience from my memory bank.
ruk

Sid_Vicious
06-26-2004, 09:17 AM
In my opinion, you are moving, probably trying to watch the OB make it's trip to the pocket and not staying still. I've not taught many to play, but I have actually relieved a few of their frustrations on latter lessons when they couldn't even make in straight shots they made most all the time before, by actually telling them just before pulling the trigger, "Shut your eyes and keep them shut." They were simply perplexed as to why the ball slapped right into the pocket. IMHO, you're moving something, and most likely trying to watch the OB. If you watch anything rolling, make it the CB, better to see ALL of the table though. The OB is already made, unless your body has it's final say...sid

tateuts
06-26-2004, 01:28 PM
Well, what you are doing is dogging. I once heard Buddy Hall say that the worst he ever dogged he completely forgot how to play pool! And that's Buddy Hall!

Here's the cure (shhhhh - it's a secret): relax.

More than likely you are flinching and not really stroking the cue ball. Stay still, make sure your everything is in it's usual place, visualize the shot, and smoothly stroke through the cue ball. Don't forget to visualize the shot and smoothly stroke it.

You will soon remember how to play pool again.

Chris

Rod
06-26-2004, 03:11 PM
ruk,

Like everyone said your moving on the shot. Actually before the c/b because your mind is anticipating the "hit" and most likely a miss. When that happens something gets tight and causes a flinch. It can be shoulders, back etc; but that is usually caused by your arm and grip pressure. The real culprit though starts in the mind.

When you close your eyes you help eliminate the (hit at) syndrome because you don't anticipate what you can't see.

Go back to what Chris mentioned, [ QUOTE ]
Chris, Stay still, make sure your everything is in it's usual place, visualize the shot, and smoothly stroke through the cue ball. Don't forget to visualize the shot and smoothly stroke it.
<hr /></blockquote>

I'll just add, do your visualization before you approach the table. You just got frustrated that added to matters. The better you become the better you go through the ball with smooth and with confidence. Just forget about it as mentioned but not to the extent it wasn't a lesson learned.

Rod

Scott Lee
06-26-2004, 03:23 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rod:</font><hr> ruk,

The real culprit though starts in the mind.

Rod <hr /></blockquote>

That's a FACT, Jack! ruk...I've told you the same things that the others here have. RELAX, and let the cue swing through the CB. Perfect your timing. Remember, it's ALL one swing of the cue...at a time! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Scott Lee

BCgirl
06-27-2004, 01:06 AM
I think you should be happy in the knowledge that there are a lot of things you're doing right, otherwise you wouldn't make the balls when you close your eyes. You read the shot correctly, select your aiming point, address the ball well.

But, when your eyes are open, you get sloppy. Perhaps you lose confidence in your aim, and "correct" it when you're down. Perhaps you just get sloppy and move your arm. Maybe, when you know you're closing your eyes, you don't use english so much or don't hit the shot so hard.

The person with the best answer to what's different between the two cases is you, and when you develop the ability to rapidly identify the subtle differences between what's going on when you're playing well, and when you're playing badly, that's when you have the ability to rapidly improve your execution. Only you can make that leap.

As others have said, you need to relax. After all, since you know you're doing so much right, it can only be a little thing that you have to fix. How tough can that be?

BCgirl

bluewolf
06-27-2004, 07:08 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote rukiddingme:</font><hr>
Maybe when I close my eyes I'm more focused on executing a nice stroke and not re-aiming and stroking...if that makes any sense.I generally do not have too much of a problem potting balls...my nemesis is cue ball control.
I am an APA 4 who can sometimes play at a high 5 level and sometimes play at a low 3 level...hence a 4.

ruk <hr /></blockquote>

I have really enjoyed the answers here. When I read your first post, my first impression was of the brain interfering with the shooting in someway, like thinking down on the shot, but the other answers make better sense, are more helpful. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Guess experience is really the best teacher. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Laura