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trailboss
07-02-2004, 01:42 PM
Hey all, I have only tried two tips. The first was a Lepro which is an ok tip and I have no real beef with it. The next was a triangle tip... whooooa this tip really moves the cueball for me. A real heads up above the Lepro. Do you think its me or is the Triangle really better?

ABChad
07-02-2004, 02:16 PM
There is definately a difference between the two tips! The Le Pro is made from vegetable tanned oak leather, and has a acetoacrylic coating. This makes for a medium hard tip. The Triangle tips are made from a chrome tanned leather and have no coating. The lack of this coating, and the grade of leather makes the triangle much harder, and the grain is way more coarse. My experience has been that this usually leads to more of the energy transfering through your cue into the CB, but you lose some control of english. The harder the tip, generally the less CB english control you have, but you gain power and longevity. I've got an Adrian Viguera that I just removed a triangle tip from, and it had probably been on the cue for over two years!!!

The only advice I have is to play around with different tips to find the one you like. It's all preference anyway, so find something that accomodates your style of play.

Good luck and keep on shooting!

Chris Cass
07-02-2004, 02:46 PM
Well, the Triangle is just a bit harder and the LePro a little bit softer till it gets down a bit. Both tips are good. I've tried both and if you'ld like to get something in a layered tip then try the Everest. It's like a cross between the two. You'll get the soft hit when dealing with the shots that you need to keep the cb to die quick and the performance of the Triangles action without mushrooming.

Lets talk about the LePro and my feelings towards it. I used the LePro for many yrs. That's an excellent tip to get used to. Then, as time goes by one gets to know the feeling of a consistant tip. That will then give you a standard to go by when judging other cues as far as the way they play. The hit and all.

You eventually come to be able to see the otyher aspects of a cue. With a consistant tip you'll be able to start feeling the difference in other cues using the same tip. Many cues use LePro' as standard. Eventually, you'll be able to see what you like in cues. The joints, the weight and the ferrule is the biggest changes you'll feel the most dramatic between them all.

LePro' ran into a problem awhile back where consistancy was an issue. The company even was rumored to being on the verge of going out of business. Now, they've always have had problems with the mushrooming and you can count on them for getting harder as time goes on as the tip gets more compressed. A good thing imho.

The consistancy and the mushrooming gave many concerns and thus the invention of the layered tips. No mushrooming, longer wear, consistancy and although the cost is a bit higher you could count on less headaches. In all actuality the layered tip imo is a glorified LePro.

Now, the hardnesses. That's where the different games come into play. Straight Pool (14.1) the LePro stood out and still does for control. The game is shot with a 4-6" bridge, usually. This is all about control. Then, there's 9 Ball. The bridge length is about 8-10" standardly used. The longer bridge and the harder tip works well for this game. More distances to cover and less confined area for the cb. Works well for Banks too. Although, One Pocket and Banks share the LePro in being able to shorten or constrict the cb into a quick direction. Either by stalling the cb or keeping that tip on the ball just a bit longer than a harder one.

This doesn't mean that the hard tips won't get the job done or the bridge length but it's less finnesse action needed in 9 Ball then persay One Pocket or Straight pool. Banks does lend itself to pulling the cb a bit to shorten up a shot so either can work for this game. I do prefer the LePro in that game too.

Now, the Triangle has the harder hit and you can finnesse the ball but you do have to keep it on a string and you might find it tough in some games. For 9 Ball I think it's ok though. I like the Sumo for 9 ball that's a harder tip WB and it hits quick and moves out quick after contacting the ob. There isn't the stall of the LePro or Triangle will have but it's a very consistant tip and if your a 9 Ball player mostly? It's a good deal.

Myself, I play everything and I went back to the LePro. It's a pain with the constant mushrooming and tip care but it's not a problem for me most the time. I adjust my bridge distances, my grip pressure and my rhythm of play.

just my .02,

C.C.

Fred Agnir
07-02-2004, 03:47 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chris Cass:</font><hr>


LePro' ran into a problem awhile back where consistancy was an issue. The company even was rumored to being on the verge of going out of business. <hr /></blockquote> LePro and Triangle are made and have always been made by the same company: Tweeten Fibre Company.

Fred

Chris Cass
07-02-2004, 10:51 PM
Hi Fred I don't remember saying they weren't. I did remember hearing concerns about the company going down about the same time the inconsistancy stories started. I think that was about, geez, maybe 12 yrs ago? I just can't remember anything lately. It might have been longer than that?

Regards,

C.C.

Chris Cass
07-02-2004, 10:55 PM
hey Fred,

I'm a big fan of the Tweaten Fibre co. Heck, I ate atleast about 5 peices of Masters in my life. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Regards,

C.C.~~perminant chalk on my hards. mmmm chalk burgers yummy.

bill190
07-03-2004, 01:23 AM
I recently took time out of my game to try different tips. I bought the equipment needed to change the tips myself such as a "Cue Top Sander" which sands the ferrule to 90 deg. or perfectly flat. Best to have a flat surface before applying a new tip. Also a gizmo to hold the tip on after gluing and the gizmos to trim and shape the tip.

Then I tried all sorts of different tips. Soft, medium, hard, different types/brands; phenolic, plastic, rubber, leather, layered, pig skin, break/jump tips, etc.

Anyway, I learned a LOT about cue tips and how different tips will play differently. I also experimented with different shaped tips; quarter, nickel, and dime.

I think this is one of the best things I ever did for my game. It was expensive, but well worth the time and money. I now know what is what and how to keep my tip in shape to prevent problems. Also if problems with the tip develop, I know what is wrong and how to fix it.

Note that my game went down the tubes while experimenting, but now I'm playing better than ever. (Once I got used to the tips I decided were the best for me.)

BLACKHEART
07-03-2004, 07:59 AM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gifHi Chad; where do you get your information? I have always been told that the "blueish" colored tips(Blue Diamond &amp; Elk Master), were chrome taned &amp; ALL of the brown tips were vegetable taned...JER

SecaucusFats
07-03-2004, 03:11 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chris Cass:</font><hr>

Lets talk about the LePro and my feelings towards it. I used the LePro for many yrs. That's an excellent tip to get used to. Then, as time goes by one gets to know the feeling of a consistant tip. That will then give you a standard to go by when judging other cues as far as the way they play. The hit and all.

C.C.

<hr /></blockquote>

That is some very good advice. Start with LePro and once you are used to it you have a standard to refer to when evaluating other tips. I used LePro for about three years and they are not a bad tip at all. After LePro I tried the Triangles, various different Chandiverts, and then played with Hercules tips for a few years. Today I use a Moori III Med and I like it best of all.

SF

Barbara
07-03-2004, 03:32 PM
SF,

You have to be kidding about LePro being "the tip"!! Yeah, they are great if you can successfully match the hardness from tip to tip!! Trust me, I used to drive Barry crazy between wearing them out so quickly and then getting two new ones that matched in hardness among my two shafts.

That's why I went to Mooris and Talismans. And even those two brands have problems when it comes to matching hardness, but not as bad as LePros.

Personally, I like the number 15 or so on Barry's scale. But that still depends on the bite test he gives it before I get to his shop.

BTW, my tour will be a Herbert's on the 17th and 18th for the 4th Annual NJ State 8-ball Championships. plese come by, spectators are welcome!! Daen Hopkins is the defending champion, but she already told me that she will in FLA with her mom.

Barbara

SecaucusFats
07-04-2004, 12:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Barbara:</font><hr> SF,

You have to be kidding about LePro being "the tip"!! Yeah, they are great if you can successfully match the hardness from tip to tip!! Trust me, I used to drive Barry crazy between wearing them out so quickly and then getting two new ones that matched in hardness among my two shafts.

That's why I went to Mooris and Talismans. And even those two brands have problems when it comes to matching hardness, but not as bad as LePros.

Personally, I like the number 15 or so on Barry's scale. But that still depends on the bite test he gives it before I get to his shop.

BTW, my tour will be a Herbert's on the 17th and 18th for the 4th Annual NJ State 8-ball Championships. plese come by, spectators are welcome!! Daen Hopkins is the defending champion, but she already told me that she will in FLA with her mom.

Barbara <hr /></blockquote>

Barbara,

I will be there to sweat the action and I would be honored to make your acquaintance (Herbert's).

On a different note please note that I never said that LePros were "all that and a bag of chips". I just happen to agree with Chris Cass that a LePro is a good starting point.

I currently use Moori III Medium tips on my playing cues and I gotta say I really like them. In the past I've had Triangles, Chandivert, and Hercules tips but the Moori just flat out outperforms them.

BTW, one supposed real good way to pretreat LePros is to dunk 'em in milk, let the milk go rancid for a sufficient time, then fish the tips out and press the bejesus out of them in a vise, but that sounds so, well..medieval.
/ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SF