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wantsumrice
07-09-2004, 01:54 PM
Which do you guys prefer? And which game is better for improving one's skill?

Tom_In_Cincy
07-09-2004, 02:10 PM
If that's the only choice I had, I'd probably end up playing cards. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Nothing wrong with either of the two games. But, if you really want to play a game that will help your skill level improve, play One Pocket. Everything you know about the game of pool, and all the shots you think you know, are included in the exercise of playing One Pocket.

To improve your skills quicker, get a certified instructor and learn how to develop your skills. Practice and play. IMO this would be the quickest way to get where you want to be.

wantsumrice
07-09-2004, 02:19 PM
lol One pocket, great idea! Never heard of it before, but which pocket do you choose, or does it really matter. I'll try that tonight, I'm the only pool player in my house, no one is willing to play me. I'll end up playing by myself. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

~ivan

Tom_In_Cincy
07-09-2004, 02:23 PM
Basic rules and a very good 'primer' to get started at www.onepocket.org (http://www.onepocket.org)

daviddjmp
07-09-2004, 02:37 PM
I would choose straight pool, 14.1 for the game that teaches the best overall skills and strategy-

randyg
07-09-2004, 02:38 PM
WANTSUMRICE: There are three skill levels that one has to acquire to compete at all games. Not all games require the same skill levels. 8-Ball & 9-Ball each require different primary skills. What is it you would like to practice?.....randyg

wantsumrice
07-09-2004, 03:07 PM
Randy, what I want to work on is using english for better cb placement.

shoutout33
07-09-2004, 03:12 PM
I agree with Tom on this one. One-Pocket is going to give you E-V-E-R-Y-T-H-I-N-G you need to be a better player in any ANY game! And even though I have not played it, and it's just as challenging as one-pocket, I feel that your 14.1 game can be improved by playing one-pocket as well. Now 8-ball is cool and all, but 9-ball is just in-your-face pocket billiards to me! I love it! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif But, to be a better overall player, one-pocket and/or 14.1. (Note: One thing about one-pocket that I think is invaluable, is that it teaches me, more than anything else, is that I need to think (look at the table carefully and plan my shots...) and have some serious patience (take my time and focus...), because if you slip, the game could be over real quick! /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

ras314
07-09-2004, 03:41 PM
Offhand I would say 9 ball puts more emphasis on position play than does 8 ball.

Might need to clarify what you mean by english. Some consider any off center cb hit as english, others say english or "side" is a hit off the vertical line thru the center of the cb.

Sounds like in your situation you may benefit from drills.

dg-in-centralpa
07-09-2004, 03:59 PM
Personally, I play 14.1 to work on my games. I play 8 ball mostly since all the leagues where I live is 8 ball. If I want a 9 ball league, I have to travel out of the county, and I don't have time for that. I play 8 & 9 ball plus 14.1 at home for practice. Wouldn't mind learning one pocket, but I don't know anyone who plays it where I live.

DG

woody_968
07-09-2004, 04:13 PM
For game improvement I would have to say 14.1 is the best. It may not help that much if you just play half!@#$ed, but if you study the game and learn to play it properly I would say it helps more than any other.

It is rapidly becomming my favorite game.

bluewolf
07-09-2004, 05:03 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ras314:</font><hr> Offhand I would say 9 ball puts more emphasis on position play than does 8 ball.
<hr /></blockquote>

I think that whether 8 or 9b is more difficult depends on a person's skill strengths. I think that 9 ball is harder in the sense that you have to play the balls in order, so you do have to get position on a particular ball and be able to plan ahead more shots. OTOH, even though you have more choices in balls in 8ball, there are more balls required to be maneuvered around, so sometimes more exact position is required. 9ball requires a person to be very good at making long shots. 8ball requires more strategy. In 8ball, the player does have to sink 8 balls and the 8 has to go in last. In nine, you can hit in most of the balls and still lose in the event that the opponent combos in the nine or you miss on one of the last few balls.

So for me, the verdict is still out on which is more difficult but I definitely think that OP is the most fun game that also requires more strategy, kicking and banking as well as being able to pot difficult cuts.

Laura

ras314
07-09-2004, 05:45 PM
BW,

Sounded like the original poster was interested in english to get shape. Not at all sure just what that means to different people but 9 ball does seem to require more effort on position play every shot than does 8 ball.

No idea as which game may be more difficult. Snooker is my guess at the most difficult game I've played. But then I never tried 3 C.

1Time
07-09-2004, 06:32 PM
I prefer 9-ball. In order to improve one's skill, any game will do. For learning fundamentals, I'd recommend 14.1 straight pool.

wantsumrice
07-09-2004, 07:10 PM
What exactly is 14.1?

woody_968
07-09-2004, 07:19 PM
14.1 is straight pool.

SPetty
07-09-2004, 07:48 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wantsumrice:</font><hr> What exactly is 14.1? <hr /></blockquote> BCA 14.1 rules (http://www.bca-pool.com/play/tournaments/rules/rls_141.shtml)

bill190
07-09-2004, 10:52 PM
Other players will tell you about English, but they may not say anything about the speed of your hit. A lot can be acomplished with a center ball hit and a slow, medium, or fast hit. I think this is just as important to me as using English. Will the cue ball bounce off a rail or two and wind up in the same area as it would using English? Practice hitting the cue ball 1 diamond, then 2, 3, etc. Also 1 rail length, 2, 3, etc. Other good practice is to try hitting the object balls so they stop just short of falling into the pocket. Do this and you will learn to control the speed of your hit.

Also other players never told me about cue ball deflection on long English shots and "pivot points" of different cue sticks. Basically this means that different cue sticks will aim differently when using English on long shots. There is a magic spot called the "pivot point" where no deflection will occur. And some shafts are "low deflection" like Predator and Meucci. You can learn to aim for long English shots when using the same cue all the time and have no need to learn about any of this deflection business, but if using house cues or buying a new cue, be aware of differences such as these. More on deflection...

Predator Shafts (http://www.predatorcues.com/english/314Z.htm)
Meucci Shafts (http://www.meuccicues.com/blackdot-chart.htm)
Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Cue Ball Squirt, But Were Afraid to Ask (http://www.sfbilliards.com/Shepard_squirt.pdf)

JayCee
07-10-2004, 04:08 PM
What are the three skill levels that one has to acquire to compete at all games? Thanks in advance for your response.

Until next time,

JC

pooltchr
07-11-2004, 09:09 PM
There are only 3 things you can control on any shot...they are Angle Speed and Spin. (There's an interesting acronym there to help you remember) Learn to control those things, and you are well on your way in any game.

Scott Lee
07-13-2004, 11:24 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bill190:</font><hr> There is a magic spot called the "pivot point" where no deflection will occur. And some shafts are "low deflection" like Predator and Meucci. You can learn to aim for long English shots when using the same cue all the time and have no need to learn about any of this deflection business, but if using house cues or buying a new cue, be aware of differences such as these. More on deflection...

Predator Shafts (http://www.predatorcues.com/english/314Z.htm)
Meucci Shafts (http://www.meuccicues.com/blackdot-chart.htm)
Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Cue Ball Squirt, But Were Afraid to Ask (http://www.sfbilliards.com/Shepard_squirt.pdf)
<hr /></blockquote>

Sorry, but if you strike the CB off-center, there will ALWAYS be some cueball deflection...even if you shoot with a steel bar. This discussion needs to be clarified in terms of cueSTICK and cueBALL deflection. Cueball deflection will occur no matter what you do, or what you shoot with, assuming you are aiming off the vertical axis of the cueball.

Scott Lee

bill190
07-13-2004, 11:55 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> Sorry, but if you strike the CB off-center, there will ALWAYS be some cueball deflection... <hr /></blockquote>

Well try the cue ball deflection test as discussed in the paper "Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Cue Ball Squirt, But Were Afraid to Ask" (Link above). I tried this and it worked. Actually before the pivot point, the cue ball will deflect one direction, but after the pivot point it will deflect the opposite direction. *At* the pivot point, there is no deflection (Or as someone pointed out to me, the differing deflections cancel each other out at the pivot point.) The test for this is further back in the paper. Note: The pivot point of the cue stick is determined by the mass of the tip. Less mass at the tip of the shaft will equal a pivot point further back from the tip and vice versa. See following for pivot points....

Platinum Billiards - Deflection Ratings (http://www.platinumbilliards.com/rating_deflect.php)

RedHell
07-13-2004, 12:04 PM
Bill,

The way I understood that is not that deflection cancel each other. I believe that there is only one deflection, the pivot point method is to compensate deflection by changing the aim. Once the aim is reset to compensate the deflection brings the CB on the correct path.

What you feel as opposite deflection is in fact over compensating the deflection by aiming to much off the correct line.

I concur with Scott that deflection is innevitable...

pooltchr
07-13-2004, 12:21 PM
Very well stated!

Frank_Glenn
07-13-2004, 01:36 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote RedHell:</font><hr> Bill,

The way I understood that is not that deflection cancel each other. I believe that there is only one deflection, the pivot point method is to compensate deflection by changing the aim. Once the aim is reset to compensate the deflection brings the CB on the correct path.
<hr /></blockquote>

This is the key. The ball deflects, you are just aiming to take that into account.

randyg
07-15-2004, 07:22 AM
JayCee:

1. Ball Pocketing
2. Cue Ball Control (position play)
3. Decision Making. (switches &amp; triggers)

Thanks....randyg