PDA

View Full Version : 9-ball Breaking tips needed



jbrideaux
07-10-2004, 06:41 PM
I have been playing snooker and 8-ball for almost 26 years and I have pretty much finalized my break for them. I recently have been trying 9-ball and I have been all over the table trying to get a break where I can actually sink a ball without the CB leaving the table or scratching. It doesn't seem to matter what spin I put on it or how hard i hit it.. nothing is consistent. and help or direction on articles would be appreciated. I have just read the articles posted by "Mike" on generating power and breaking but I would like to hear more from anyone that has any good tips .. Thanx
James ...

stickman
07-10-2004, 08:52 PM
No spin! Hit the head ball perfectly square, and park the cueball in the center of the table. Experiment where you break from along the front line of the kitchen.

Frank_Glenn
07-10-2004, 10:10 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote jbrideaux:</font><hr> I have been playing snooker and 8-ball for almost 26 years and I have pretty much finalized my break for them. I recently have been trying 9-ball and I have been all over the table trying to get a break where I can actually sink a ball without the CB leaving the table or scratching. It doesn't seem to matter what spin I put on it or how hard i hit it.. nothing is consistent. and help or direction on articles would be appreciated. I have just read the articles posted by "Mike" on generating power and breaking but I would like to hear more from anyone that has any good tips .. Thanx
James ... <hr /></blockquote>

Don't jack way up. If the cueball is in the air when it hits the head ball, it tends to jump off the table. Any time you jack up, the cueball jumps. I hit with center ball and try to hit the one full. The cueball will jump back about 6-8" and stop when done properly. It will stay right there unless another ball hits it.

stickman
07-10-2004, 10:25 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Frank_Glenn:</font><hr>
Don't jack way up. <hr /></blockquote>

Good point, Frank. That is almost always, if not always the problem, when the cueball comes off the table.

wantsumrice
07-10-2004, 10:33 PM
Where would be a good place for an 8-ball break?

Rod
07-10-2004, 10:54 PM
Near level cue as suggested. One very important part of keeping whitey on the table though, is hit the c/b center and the head ball center. If your use to snooker and such then your not use to breaking hard. Trying to generate a lot of (uncontroled) power will send whitey flying in a heart beat. I'll suggest you slow down, only shoot hard enough to hit the head ball square. That's can be a tough order for many because they want to kill them. I'll give you a double your money back guarantee! lol If you make it a point to "shoot within your limits",but "slightly under is better" about 80%, you'll break much better. In time you'll learn control is number 1. Stay near that 80% from here on out. Your break speed will increase with accuracy without using any more effort.

Speaking of effort, hold the cue light, don't grab the cue and try to spread them from there to Texas. lol Bad habbits won't improve your break at all. One day you might be able to smack em real hard with control, but you'd better put in a fair amount of time practicing your break.

Rod

jbrideaux
07-11-2004, 03:46 AM
8-ball breaks..
I usually go three fingers from the right rail just below the head string, a little bottom right and hit the second ball directly .. this will do one of three things .. make the corner ball in the corner pocket, the 8-ball in the left side or if the hit is wrong a scratch in the right corner pocket .. so take some time and practice to get it right .. I usually get 6-8 8-balls on the break on a good night , and almost 80% get at least one ball on the break

have fun and I hope this helps
James

stickman
07-11-2004, 08:28 AM
Additionally, I suggest a looped bridge for breaking. Lengthen your bridge and adjust your your grip hand back a little. Time your break when you contact the cueball at the moment of greatest speed. Most importantly, be accurate, don't sacrifice accuracy for speed. Practice and gradually increase speed only when you can hit the headball accurately. Throwing your body into the break and jumping up will do little for your break but diminish your accuracy.

Chris Cass
07-11-2004, 11:07 PM
Get the book Joe Tuckers Racking Secrets. It'll open your eyes if not make you aware.

C.C.

tateuts
07-13-2004, 05:33 PM
Racking tight is a skill. If you can't rack tight, you can't break well. There's a difference between the balls somewhat touching and a frozen rack. A frozen rack explodes.

The other thing is to feel like you are pausing on the transition from your back stroke to your final forward stroke - this allows a smoother transfer of power forward through the cueball. This will help you to stay as relaxed as possible through the shoulder and upper arm. Although there will be a dynamic tension, it's like throwing a fastball - the more relaxed the arm and upper body feels the better it is.

Chris

woody_968
07-13-2004, 05:56 PM
Another tip is dont take the cue back too fast. Like I tell the guys at the golf course, ya dont hit it with your backswing /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

1a2b3c
07-13-2004, 08:23 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote jbrideaux:</font><hr> 8-ball breaks..
I usually go three fingers from the right rail just below the head string, a little bottom right and hit the second ball directly .. this will do one of three things .. make the corner ball in the corner pocket, the 8-ball in the left side or if the hit is wrong a scratch in the right corner pocket .. so take some time and practice to get it right .. I usually get 6-8 8-balls on the break on a good night , and almost 80% get at least one ball on the break

have fun and I hope this helps
James
<hr /></blockquote>

6-8 8 ball breaks a night!?!?! And i thought i was good at ending the game with one shot.