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View Full Version : Chinese Taipai-Kickin' A$$!!!



recoveryjones
07-16-2004, 01:40 PM
Looking at the form chart I must confess that I really under estimated the players from the Chinese Taipai. I knew about Fong Pang Chao and figured that his chances would be great to make the final four.I've also read that Yang was a great player, with a chance to win.With great players like Strickland, Soquet, Bustamnte, Reyes,Immonen,Hohmann, Davis, Drago etc.etc. out, however,I'm wondering where these (lesser known) Taipai players are coming from.Four of them have officially made the final eight.

Could it be the fact that they are playing on their home soil with a jam packed (enthusiastic) partisen crowd? Could it be the fact that on their own tour they are quite accustomed to playing in TV matches? Whatever they are doing, these guys are doing great!It's really awakened me to just how good these guys really are.

If you go the the link (below)you can read an excellent article by Ted Lerner on "The Imcomparable Mr.Tu" After reading that section you will realize that they are they are now teaching POOL in their public schools, AS A CLASS. Can you imagine going to school and learning math, geometry and POOL!Having said that, I think we will be hearing from the Chinese Taipai players for years to come. RJ
http://worldpoolchampionship.com/article_detail.asp?article_id=2061

cacee31
07-16-2004, 05:58 PM
I think playing in Taiwan might have the effect of makign them play just a bit better. Alot of good players from Taiwan don't play tournaments in the US and Europe because of language and other difficulties. You can find them mostly on the Asian tour. The big tournaments in Japan also have alot of Taiwanese players playing.

The pool classes at school is only for a few schools i think. Pool is still somewhat considered a "less than ideal" sport for youngsters in Taiwan due to old misconceptions. Most of the pool learning in Taiwan are done in pool halls. Most pool halls in Taiwan has at least 1 in house coach, sometimes more than 1 for some of the bigger places. So when youngesters first start to play pool, they have a much better chance of learning the correct techniques and strategies from good players, as oppose to having to develop the skills based on trial and error. Pool's also broadcasted regularly on TV, so good pool's always around. Having lived in N America, I always find there isn't enough pool on TV when I want to watch some, that's not the case in Taiwan.

Off the top of my head, I can think of close to 10 other players from Taiwan who are good enough to play in the WPC and at least make it to the round of 64. There are probably more I guess. It is, like in the US, getting hard to make good money by playing tournaments only. There are some good players that choose to remain unknown so they can play money games, kinda like what's happening to some extent in the US.

Sid_Vicious
07-16-2004, 06:14 PM
"There are some good players that choose to remain unknown so they can play money games, kinda like what's happening to some extent in the US."

You'll just luck across seeing the best US players because of that. I can only guess that many of the truly super greats were never seen before they passed away...sid~~~not one of them

Popcorn
07-16-2004, 07:24 PM
Pool is such a dead end sport that a lot of potently top player don't pursue the game as they would if it was more worth while. I don't think it has all that much to do with staying under cover. Most gamblers and road players play, but never reach what could have been their top game. Players like Scott Lee, or C.C. or maybe even me or you, if we became fanatics might have a top player in us but we will never know and could care less, because pool is not something to devote your life to. For every known top player there are probably dozens on players that had all the tools but never reached their potential. Top players now and in the future will come from where ever the game is takes seriously, pool it is not a very difficult game. Just some thoughts.

recoveryjones
07-16-2004, 07:58 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> Pool is such a dead end sport that a lot of potently top player don't pursue the game as they would if it was more worth while. I don't think it has all that much to do with staying under cover. Most gamblers and road players play, but never reach what could have been their top game. Players like Scott Lee, or C.C. or maybe even me or you, if we became fanatics might have a top player in us but we will never know and could care less, because pool is not something to devote your life to. For every known top player there are probably dozens on players that had all the tools but never reached their potential. Top players now and in the future will come from where ever the game is takes seriously, pool it is not a very difficult game. Just some thoughts. <hr /></blockquote>

Good post Popcorn.

Our very best pro players locally are our best players for a reason.They've devoted their whole lives to pool.

Not to put any of them down or anything, however the vast majority of them are old and pretty much broke or scraping by not to comfortably.When you see pros (who were once on TV) getting mad because they miss a shot in a local pool halls ($100) Sunday tournament it's kinda sad.Especially when they are mad because they really need the money.(please don't ask who the pro is because I think it's best to keep that persons anonimity)

I agree that the game is simple to a point, however, to get to the very top levels there is nothing simple about that at all.Either you've got God given talent or you've probably worked your A$$ of extensivley.RJ

wantsumrice
07-17-2004, 12:20 AM
I can't see why pool would be so demanding. It reminds me of ping-pong, just another side "job". I mean, you could easily have a back-up job, and still play in tourny's right?

I figure, you work from 8-7, come home, play some pool for 3-4 hours and sleep. Rinse, wash and repeat.

~ivan /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

Popcorn
07-17-2004, 12:53 AM
That is what most players do even the ones that play in the bigger tournaments. That was the point of my post. You can be a very good player playing like that but it takes more of a commitment to get to what ever may be your highest potential. What a player maybe could do is to put all on hold for a few years and just play and see what kind of player they may be. With the reality in mind that at a point they will have to move on with their life. At least they will be able to have maybe played to their potential even if only briefly. It is not something you can make a living at. To be honest, who would want to. It stops being fun once it becomes a business you depend on.