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SPetty
07-20-2004, 03:05 PM
Does anyone know anything about dehumidifiers?

Apparently, my air conditioner is too big, and therefore doesn't run as much as it should, so even though it is quite cool, it is still more humid than I'd like. So, I thought I'd get a dehumidifer.

I looked up "dehumidifier" on eBay to see what's out there, and there are many different kinds at many different prices.

What should I look for? What makes a good dehumidifier? Do all of them automatically turn off when they're full? Are they all really the same? Anything else I need to know before buying one? I really know nothing about them...

Barbara
07-20-2004, 05:09 PM
Well I'l try and tell you all I know about 'em.

I've got one in the basement cause it would get clammy in the summertime while I was trying to practice with only a small window unti to cool the room down. It's just a standup floor model, no big deal. There's a bucket that catches the water and you have to make sure it's positioned correctly within the unit, or the unit won't shut off when the bucket is full and you get water on the floor. Pete rigged it to permanently drain out our main drain so he doesn't have to empty it all the time. It will put some heat in the air because of the nature of what it's doing - working. And if there's not enough moisture in the air, it may even freeze up, but the newer ones are designed to shut down.

That's all I can tell ya.

Barbara

ras314
07-20-2004, 08:59 PM
Probably your best bet is to do a google for dehumidifier. It would help if you have some measurements of relative humidity in your pool room over the year. Oregon Scientific has some inexpensive RH meters.

You can always run a heater and air conditioner at the same time if you're desperate, dehumidifiers use a lot of power anyway. They are basically an air conditioner without an outside heat sink.

I have a small unit that will run full time whenever it is damp here, usually can keep RH under 50 %. Then set a humidifier to keep RH over 30 %. Both units are automatic. Petty Point is much bigger than my digs so not much point in going into what size stuff I use. Mine is a Fedders unit, used to be a good brand but no idea what is best now that most everything is made in China anyway.

Wally_in_Cincy
07-21-2004, 06:11 AM
Our basement is a bit damp (Oh I forgot, you Texans don't know what a basement is /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif )

There is actually a little bit of mold on the frame under our pool table. It could have been there a long time, I don't know. Anyway, Kathy got a dehumidifier at Sears and set it at 50% and it ran almost constantly. You could tell a big difference in the air and the way the table played (less cling on the balls)

It's set at 70% now. I think she was afraid of getting a big utility bill. It is still comfortable. It runs about 1/3 of the time. Holds 2 gallons. Needs emptied about every 36 hours. Shuts off automatically.

Only problem is it puts off heat. My pool room went from a comfy 68 degrees to about 73. I shut the thing off when I'm down there.

How did you get an AC unit that is too big? I used to know how to figure that requirement, it's not that hard.

SPetty
07-21-2004, 08:41 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>(Oh I forgot, you Texans don't know what a basement is /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif )

How did you get an AC unit that is too big? <hr /></blockquote>With the advent of T.V. a few years ago, I can now say that I've heard of a basement, and I've even seen them on T.V.!

I was thinking the place to put it would be right in front of the A/C intake vent. Then maybe it wouldn't affect the temperature too much. Or maybe I should put it under the thermostat!

I googled before I posted here - there was just too much information to go through. If you start out knowing absolutely nothing, it's hard to weed through all the info! I was hoping you guys could get me started...

How did I get an AC unit that is too big? I trusted the AC seller! It was probably a difficult computation because it's not like a "normal" house with walls and stuff. It's just one big area with high ceilings.

woody_968
07-21-2004, 08:48 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr>
I googled before I posted here - <hr /></blockquote>

Sorry, but for some reason this struck me as REALLY funny /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Wally_in_Cincy
07-21-2004, 09:22 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr>I was thinking the place to put it would be right in front of the A/C intake vent.<hr /></blockquote>

You are making my brain work too hard /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif.

I would not think that would be necessary.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr>maybe I should put it under the thermostat!<hr /></blockquote>

If you do that you will "trick" the thermostat and your room temp will be too cold. Put it somewhere between the two and somewhere out of the way. Your AC will just run a bit more to remove the excess heat from the room.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr>How did I get an AC unit that is too big? I trusted the AC seller! It was probably a difficult computation because it's not like a "normal" house with walls and stuff. It's just one big area with high ceilings. <hr /></blockquote>

That's inexcusable. It's not that hard to figure out. You take the R value of the walls, figure the cu. ft. of the room, consider the heat put off by the lights and people in the room and the outside temp. Any decent HVAC salesman should know how to figure that.

Rich R.
07-22-2004, 04:36 AM
SPetty, most of the moveable home units have the removable bucket for the water. It shuts off the unit, when the water in the bucket hits a certain level.
However, most of those buckets also have a knock-out plug and a connection, where you can attach a hose.
If you decide to get one of these units, I highly recommend you place it in a way, that you can take advantage of the knock-out and use a hose, directly into a drain. That way, the unit never fills up and you don't have to haul a bucket full of water. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
It will also continue to work, when you are away from home.

BTW, controls on the front of the unit will allow you to control how much moisture the unit takes out of the air and your unit will turn on and off accordingly. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I've been running one of these units, in my basement, for 20 years and I have not had to haul water once. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif