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View Full Version : Play Or Not With Twinge In The Shoulder?



Sid_Vicious
07-25-2004, 12:07 PM
Old age getting to me I guess, but last Thursday morning I got up with what feels like a nerve pinch right where the sholder meets the arm, maybe a rotator cup, don't know. My pool was suddenly restricted to no left handed shots(I'm right but play left a lot) and even the right handed ones cause me to very slowly place my bridge hand, wincing in pain through a predictable segment even so. Back in my younder days I would simply live with it and it would subside before I knew it, but not today. I played yesterday by taking pain pills and muscle relaxers, and it still did not settle down hardly at all. Am I prolonging my recovery by doing this, or will it most likely get better in time with me still playing the game with the pain?

I'm not one to run to the doctor, never have been one to believe many of their advices, just tough out things like the old days. Not many would understand that not playing at all is much of an option. Ideas, besides sitting in a physicians office???sid

trailboss
07-25-2004, 01:48 PM
Try a warm heating pad on the area for three days, if it does not feel a lot better in three days you have two choices: get a good Chiropracter to check it out or get a good sports medicine guy to check it out. Lay off using it for three days and see if your condition improves first. If not, a plain old M.D. wont know squat about it except referring you to a specialist which you can do yourself and save the bucks! Get well soon!

trailboss
07-25-2004, 02:40 PM
Hi Sid! I am not trying to give you medical advice other than what I have been through myself. Rest the area for a few days and if not improved, please get a specialist in this area ok? I hope this gets well soon for you! Good luck and God Bless!!!!

NewJack
07-25-2004, 06:25 PM
I have two suggestions:

1- Don't play through it. You can aggravate the injury or possibly promote bad mechanics by changing the way you shoot. All I remember from health class is RICE: rest, ice, compression, elevation.

2- Don't see a chiropractor. I'd go the normal GP or sports medicine route before subjecting myself to possible quackery.

Good luck.

SecaucusFats
07-25-2004, 06:33 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> Old age getting to me I guess, but last Thursday morning I got up with what feels like a nerve pinch right where the sholder meets the arm, maybe a rotator cup, don't know. My pool was suddenly restricted to no left handed shots(I'm right but play left a lot) and even the right handed ones cause me to very slowly place my bridge hand, wincing in pain through a predictable segment even so. Back in my younder days I would simply live with it and it would subside before I knew it, but not today. I played yesterday by taking pain pills and muscle relaxers, and it still did not settle down hardly at all. Am I prolonging my recovery by doing this, or will it most likely get better in time with me still playing the game with the pain?

I'm not one to run to the doctor, never have been one to believe many of their advices, just tough out things like the old days. Not many would understand that not playing at all is much of an option. Ideas, besides sitting in a physicians office???sid <hr /></blockquote>

Take an over the counter NSAID like Aleve, Motrin, etc. Lay off the shoulder, no pool, no nada. Moist hot packs and gentle massage with a topical analgesic. If the pain persists or intensifies see your MD. If you do not have any serious injury see a chiropractor, and stick to the treatment for the prescribed time, you and your shoulder will both be happy.

This has been a health advisory from the Fat guy in the Meadowlands. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

SF

tateuts
07-25-2004, 06:45 PM
Contrary to other posters, I don't think simply playing pool is going to further damage or hurt your shoulder, but it may damage your wallet. I would suggest Motrin (without the alchohol chaser!) and definitely recommend seeing your doctor if it doesn't go away in a few weeks.

I don't know how old you are Sid, but once you get to be about 50 you need to see a doctor every year for a physical. That can save you a lot of grief later on. Don't say "I Know, I Know" - just go. I can't stand seeing mine but I force myself anyway.

Shoulder thing is probably a minor rotator cuff tendenitis if it's short term. If it lasts more than a few weeks, it could be a tear.

Chris

Ps. I don't know if you do much lifting, but lifting boxes or weights, particlarly above your head or out in front of your body can really aggravate shoulders.

Rod
07-25-2004, 07:19 PM
Age might be a part but not something you can't work through. I'm going against the grain here. Doctors don't know diddley, they'll just send you to a specialist. Not that that is bad but that's what happens in most cases. Don't see a chiropractor for muscle problems.

At any rate you might give it a little break and you probably need arm and shoulder exercise. I had very similar to what you mention. I had not played for several years. It seemed my shoulder wasn't use to my static left arm bridge extension. Not only that but I was probably putting to much weight on my hand. It started at the shoulder and twinged\burned from there to my neck. At the time I tried some weights and pushups. It worked no problem.

Later on I hurt the same shoulder but a guy showed me an exercise using a 15 lb dumbell. It's difficult to explain but that worked also. It wouldn't have to be 15 lbs, use lighter and more reps. I'm no body builder by the way.

There is a young lady here that gets this stuff all the time. I'm her masseuse. LOL I'd rather do that than watch hacks beat the balls around. Same type of problem, but her muscles are tight as a banjo string. After about 20 minutes it's close to normal. I've told her to exercise that area but it's waisted words I guess. Your body\mind should know by now if it's serious or if your like the millions of other people that create problems with lack of exercise.

Didn't you have some lower back problems recently?

~~rod, just calling um like I see em

Candyman
07-25-2004, 08:27 PM
I have been through the whole shoulder thing, including surgery. My deal was a completely torn suprospinatus. When he opened me up he sewed it bach together, but he also did some grinding on the socket. I had some rough areas and he smoothed them out. That was just age and wear and tear. My suggestion to you would be to find a personel trainer with a back ground in physical therepy. They can move your arm around and pretty much detect the exact area of the problem. The joint is very complex and it could be a lot of different things causing the problem. You can do a Yahoo search on "rotator cuff" and pick up a lot of info. Here is just one site that will give you some rehab exercises. I hope you feel better soon. Regards, Lock


http://familydoctor.org/265.xml

cueball1950
07-25-2004, 08:42 PM
Hi Sid. I have to agree with most everybody here about seeing a specialist. Don't play thru it. Like candyman, i have ben thru the surgery also. Only on both shoulders. I had what they called acromiaplasty with a distal clavacle resectioning. In laymans terms. Whenever i used my arm. raising it or what ever it felt like a was pinching a nerve. What it was actually doing was the bone from the upper arm was rubbing against the shoulder socket. was not a very painful operation. but don't do like i did and ignore it. Go see an orthopedic surgeon who you know and trust. If you don't know one. ask around. and get input from others that do. i hope this helps you. good luck with your decision.....................................mike

Rip
07-25-2004, 08:49 PM
Rod,
How giving of you to be this lady's masseuse. You are such a generous human being. LOL!

Regards,
Rip /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Rod
07-25-2004, 09:08 PM
It's the very least I could do! /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif I know I'm being used like a peice of meat. ha ha ha

Scott Lee
07-25-2004, 09:25 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote NewJack:</font><hr> 2- Don't see a chiropractor. I'd go the normal GP or sports medicine route before subjecting myself to possible quackery.

Good luck. <hr /></blockquote>

You are misinformed sir. There are quack MD's just like there are excellent, highly skilled chiropractors. To lump all chiropractors as quacks is not only ridiculous, but a slam to some excellent treatment. BTW, I used to feel the same way you did...until I became EDUCATED!

Scott Lee

charlieb
07-25-2004, 09:36 PM
I suggest that you do not play through the pain. I did several yrs ago and the end result was I could not play for 4 mos! It took 3 epidurals and 39 days of traction to relieve the pain. I have since gone to a shoulder specialist who told me that I have acute tendenitis and a bone spur that is slowly tearing my rotator cuff. I can still play but only for an hour or two and when I feel my shoulder and hand start to hurt and tingle I stop and take an anti-inflammatory and a pain pill. Not as much fun as it used to be but I am really not ready to go under the knife! I suggest that you lay off for a few weeks and if it persists go to a specialist and find out what is really happening with your body. Just a thought.

Sid_Vicious
07-25-2004, 09:39 PM
It's gotten better, or possibly the pain pills and relaxers finally took hold. I usually go to the PH on Sundays but not today, even though I did hit some balls and instruct a student on my home table. I watched a lot instead of playing. Still I did hit balls today and then again tonight at another home close by equipped with a table, but just friendly play-play. It was when I was putting on a pullover shirt this afternoon that I realized that I did it without much apprehension of the pain zones, and then again when reaching behind the seat with my left arm in the car for the seat belt, that I knew I was going to heal. All in all I probably over reacted, and yet if I'd have gotten worse by not following y'all advice at all, I would certainly have been the dummy. The decision to play semi-intensely yesterday for the day worried me that I had furthered my ailment, but that feeling was probably panic cuz I wondered this morning after waking to pretty much the same hurts, that I'd possibly begun a slow trip to the surgeon since it was still a "big nag" keeping me from my normal routine.

As far as losing money, well I'd decided to lay low on that aspect before the twinge(another topic), and yet I did shoot some races to five for $5 Saturday and broke even after quickly getting down two sets. I felt I'd won a title match just getting back one set, much less the second, both of which went hill-hill, required many more uses of the bridge than I'm used to, and a lot of safeties rather than stroking with confidence and running toward the nine.

Yes I did have the back problem a month or two back, so I guess I'm going to have to face the fact that I'm out of shape in general. Thanks to everyone for the helpful ideas, it's going well today, and I will coast on playing for a bit. I have a family deal this weekend so pool is out until maybe the second weekend afterwards, not a bad thing huh...sid

Rod
07-25-2004, 10:33 PM
Nope it's not a bad thing. Really consider some light exercise. You'll know if it's right or not. If it hurts then don't do it. Sometimes a little break is all you need.

If I can describe this with a dumbbell piece of steel bottle, or no weight at all if necessary. Start with your arm and elbow this way--#1

------
-
-
-

Then raise it to this position--#2
-
-
-
------

Then extend it to this position #3

------------------

Then bring it back to #2 then lower to #1. Take it easy and make all motions at a slower deliberate pace. Repeat 10 times. Be sure and do both sides. If you want it gives the sore shoulder a rest if you want to repeat 10 more times. It's a simple little exercise and has little stress on the shoulder, you'll know soon enough if it's a problem. Here is a link to some shoulder exercise although I suggest you not do the strenuous ones.
exercise (http://www.dreamagic.com/gypsy/shouldex.html) Just a thought.

Rod

catscradle
07-26-2004, 05:48 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote NewJack:</font><hr> I have two suggestions:

1- Don't play through it. You can aggravate the injury or possibly promote bad mechanics by changing the way you shoot. All I remember from health class is RICE: rest, ice, compression, elevation.
<hr /></blockquote>
I've been known to run marathons with the flu and play soccer games (try anyway) with pulled hamstrings, but I've got to agree with this. RICE I don't think really applies here. I think if there is swelling use ice if not use heat to encourage blood flow.

[ QUOTE ]

2- Don't see a chiropractor. I'd go the normal GP or sports medicine route before subjecting myself to possible quackery.

Good luck. <hr /></blockquote>

I agree the worse possible thing you could do is see a Chiropractor (Christian Science is better than that), the second worse think you can do is see a regular MD. Go to a sports medicine clinic, they are use to dealing with this type of injury and they are used to people who want (need?) to continue in their choosen physical activity.
I repeat don't see a chriopractor, go see a voodoo doctor or Jimmy Swaggart first.
JMHO.

marek
07-26-2004, 06:24 AM
Hi!
I used to have terrible back and shoulder problems due to the pool practice four years ago (I am 26 now). Ordinary doctors were no help for me, the treatment couldnt help a bit. Then my friend told me to visit one chiropractor who helped him in the past. Now I can tell you the doctor was 91 years old (!!!) but had the strenght to break my arm with his bare hands!!! Once a week for the period of two months I went to him for the treatment ("broken" neck, acupuncture..you know /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif) Also he told me to strengthen my back muscles which I did. If it wasnt for him, I wouldnt play pool now...

NewJack
07-26-2004, 09:22 AM
http://www.chirobase.org/

Required reading for anyone considering chiropractic.

Popcorn
07-26-2004, 09:42 AM
I think you owe us an explanation as to why you think this about chiropractors . I had very positive results with a chiropractor when Md.'s wanted to put me on pain killers. I walked out of the office after like three treatments and never had another problem. By the way in many sports clinics you will find chiropractors and therapists not MD.'s. My insurance recognizes chiropractors and you don't even need a referral.

NewJack
07-26-2004, 09:54 AM
I'm not saying chiropractic is all bad, just seems to be many bad chiropractors. Please read the site I linked to. I didn't mean to slam the entire field, just be extremely wary when choosing a chiropractor.

catscradle
07-26-2004, 10:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> I think you owe us an explanation as to why you think this about chiropractors . I had very positive results with a chiropractor when Md.'s wanted to put me on pain killers. I walked out of the office after like three treatments and never had another problem. By the way in many sports clinics you will find chiropractors and therapists not MD.'s. My insurance recognizes chiropractors and you don't even need a referral.
<hr /></blockquote>

They have worked for some people, but I also know people who have been totally screwed up by them. I feel the field does not have sufficient oversight. It is very easy for somebody to call themselves a Chiropractor who is really not very qualified. Most of them seem somewhat culty to me. Of course, I'm talking in this area, another area maybe another reality.

That said my wife went to a Chiropractor for her chronic back pain despite my protestations. He didn't harm her, but I don't think he helped either. She has seen more relieve from traditional physical therapy and if after they have her in good shape she does the exercises at home they prescribe she doesn't have a problem. Of course, she stops doing the exercises because she feels good and eventually she doesn't feel good and returns to the cycle.

Bottom line there is just too little oversight of Chiropractors and I don't want them screwing with my back.

Wally_in_Cincy
07-26-2004, 11:12 AM
When I was younger I had a vertebrae in my lower back that was out of line. A few visits to a chiro fixed it. He would whack it back in line every few days until it finally stayed. Sure beat having surgery.

Of course I would doubt how much a chiro could help a herniated or deteriorated disc as opposed to a spinal alignment problem. I know some chiros around here are doing spinal decompression therapy and a lot of people swear by it. Jeanette Lee has this done daily I read somewhere. So maybe they have value, if they are ethical and up-to-date on their training.

Popcorn
07-26-2004, 11:37 AM
What it comes down to is taking personal responsibility. Even with your own MD. you have to do your homework to be sure he is what you want. I had surgery a while back and my doctor was the guy that does the Miami Dolphins and Greg Norman. Most doctors historys are now public record. Are they published, What is their schooling, have there been any disciplinary actions against them, it is all out there for you to look at. Don't depend on others to do important work you should be doing.

canwin
07-27-2004, 05:41 AM
You can also go to a martial arts studio and talk with the sensei, who can give you a chi alignment (alignment of the spine), or steer you to someone in the martial arts community who can. Martial artists who have a lot of experience in treating pain/injuries are as knowledgeable as chiropractors and its economical too. canwin

catscradle
07-27-2004, 06:31 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> What it comes down to is taking personal responsibility. Even with your own MD. you have to do your homework to be sure he is what you want. ... <hr /></blockquote>

I certainly can't argue with that sentiment. The thing is I think that the only data most people check for Chiros is hearsay. Most people go to Chiros simply because there buddy said the Chiro did great things for them.
Years ago, after my first marathon, my hips were in real pain, severely limiting my running. If I had gone to a Chiro they would have said it was because of a misalignment and started screwing with my back, if I went to most MDs, they would have simply said "Don't run". Instead I did some research and reading and found that the pain was common and due to muscle imbalance causing the hip joint to not properly go through it's correct motion. I added leg lifts to my post-run exercise routine and after a month or so the pain was gone. Periodically I'd get lazy and stop doing the leg lifts and the pain would come back.
The point is most MDs have an agenda and Chiros have an agenda. They are all convinced X is the answer where X is what they do, they rarely open their eyes to consider Y.

Popcorn
07-27-2004, 09:25 AM
You did exactly what I am referring to, you didn't put yourself at the mercy of someone who because they are in a certain field you have to blindly follow them, you did some research yourself. Doctors sometimes seem like they are geniuses because they cure you, but all that happened was, you had something common and they gave the common treatment and you responded. Diagnosing and treating, is a whole different thing. There is so much the average doctor doesn't not know anything about and to be honest can't be expected to. In most doctors offices today 30% of the space is occupied with doing paper work and most of the staff have nothing to do with medical treatment. Only a fraction of the total work hours of the doctors and employees has anything to do with curing anything.

catscradle
07-27-2004, 09:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> You did exactly what I am referring to, you didn't put yourself at the mercy of someone who because they are in a certain field you have to blindly follow them, you did some research yourself. Doctors sometimes seem like they are geniuses because they cure you, but all that happened was, you had something common and they gave the common treatment and you responded. Diagnosing and treating, is a whole different thing. There is so much the average doctor doesn't not know anything about and to be honest can't be expected to. In most doctors offices today 30% of the space is occupied with doing paper work and most of the staff have nothing to do with medical treatment. Only a fraction of the total work hours of the doctors and employees has anything to do with curing anything. <hr /></blockquote>

I think that we agree in that neither of us trust MDs or Chiros too much, but disagree in that you distrust MDs more and I distrust Chiros more.

CrispyFish
07-27-2004, 10:46 AM
I haven't read the whole thread, so forgive me if all this has already been addressed, but I do have some experience with this.

If the pain is in your bridge shoulder, then a rotator cuff injury sounds likely, due to the positioning of the arm.

RICE most certainly DOES apply to this scenario. You need to reduce the inflammation in the shoulder socket. Anti-inflammatories will help with this.

If the pain comes back, I strongly suggest staying away from the table for a while. Look up exercises for rotator cuff rehabilitation and do them religiously. A quality physical therapist can help.

This is NOT a minor problem. If you do not address it, you will end up with chronic pain, even when not playing, and that is a miserable experience.

This goes for the younger players as well. I'm 25 and have had rotator cuff pain for the last 6 months or so. Believe me, this is NOT something to just "push through".

Good luck getting better!

Popcorn
07-27-2004, 11:14 AM
I take neither at face value. I would never use a doctor without doing some good checking first, far more then just word of mouth.

marek
07-27-2004, 02:05 PM
Wooooooo! way too much info for me to read..
I can only tell chiropractor worked for me...and it was my last resort... /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

bluewolf
07-28-2004, 10:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rod:</font><hr> Age might be a part but not something you can't work through. I'm going against the grain here. Doctors don't know diddley, they'll just send you to a specialist. Not that that is bad but that's what happens in most cases. Don't see a chiropractor for muscle problems.

~~rod, just calling um like I see em <hr /></blockquote>

Depends on the chiropractor. In general I agree with you but had one back home who was a massage specialist before he became a chiro and it seems like more and more of them are doing accupressure. If all they do is 'snap, crackle and pop' i would find another chiro.

Laura