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View Full Version : Aligning ala Allison?



Cueless Joey
07-29-2004, 05:57 PM
Doesn't her alignment routine make so much sense?
She aligns her right pec to the line of shot, puts the cue in that line and strokes thru that line.
Granted we have different bodies, doesn't it make sense to find a spot in your chest/shoulder that's the naturally in line with your stroke?
I've been lining up with the inside of my right pec and the results have convinced me I've been lining up wrong most of my life. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

trailboss
07-29-2004, 06:06 PM
This gal has more training than meets the eye. I have heard she has played Snooker for X amount of years before she decided to enter Pool. The training was there all along, it was just a matter of adjusting her techniqe to accomodate the heavier Pool balls.

Barbara
07-29-2004, 06:21 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote trailboss:</font><hr> This gal has more training than meets the eye. I have heard she has played Snooker for X amount of years before she decided to enter Pool. The training was there all along, it was just a matter of adjusting her techniqe to accomodate the heavier Pool balls. <hr /></blockquote>

Okay, so who has Allison been working with? I mean, she couldn't have learned the ins and outs of pool all by herself.

After all, Karen Corr has been learning from Petey Fusco for a few years and has really learned to take some chances - if that's possible from a former snooker player. But then again, I see her compete off the camera, too.

Barbara

trailboss
07-29-2004, 07:33 PM
I have heard that her snooker trainer also plays pool and has trained her in this area as well. Like I say, I have only heard this and cannot be 100% sure.

Wally_in_Cincy
07-30-2004, 06:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Barbara:</font><hr>Okay, so who has Allison been working with? I mean, she couldn't have learned the ins and outs of pool all by herself. <hr /></blockquote>

I'm pretty sure Grady taught her to play 9-ball back in the 90's. I have not heard anything about her taking instruction since then.

Too bad Chris in NC doesn't hang around here anymore. He would know.

Scott Lee
07-30-2004, 09:43 AM
Wally...Alison and Gerda both attended RandyG's pool school in Dallas a couple of years ago. I'm sure that had a LOT to do with their improvement!

BTW, did you get your tape?

Scott

Wally_in_Cincy
07-30-2004, 09:55 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> Wally...Alison and Gerda both attended RandyG's pool school in Dallas a couple of years ago. I'm sure that had a LOT to do with their improvement!
<hr /></blockquote>

I was certain somebody had been tweaking AF's game just had not heard who it was.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> BTW, did you get your tape?
<hr /></blockquote>


Yep. Got it yesterday. Thanks. I started watching it right away. I'm sure it will help us.

Cueless Joey
07-30-2004, 10:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> Wally...Alison and Gerda both attended RandyG's pool school in Dallas a couple of years ago. I'm sure that had a LOT to do with their improvement!

BTW, did you get your tape?

Scott <hr /></blockquote>
Are you sure they did not go to Fast Larry's trickshot school? /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fred Agnir
07-30-2004, 10:56 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote trailboss:</font><hr> This gal has more training than meets the eye. I have heard she has played Snooker for X amount of years before she decided to enter Pool. <hr /></blockquote> I guess I don't understand this post. To the eye, Allison has the most fundamentally sound technique of all the female players. So, the training is obvious.

The fact that she's an umpteen time Ladies World Snooker Champion is well known, in case you didn't know.

IMO, when Allison first came over, she was a terrible 9-ball player, even though she started winning WPBA events almost immediately (before her tour with Grady). Her patterns were completely crazy, but her speed control and one-rail position was just so good (brought over from her snooker experience) that her technique simply was that much better than the other female players.

I think the two things that made her a true 9-ball player were her whirlwind tour with Grady Matthews and her close relationship with Gerda Hofstatter. Gerda had been long known to have some of the, if not *the* best pattern play amoung the women. IIRC, Allison said that her tour with Grady was like going to school. I would think that the additional skill in the areas of power shots, kicking and multi-rail position were strongly influenced by Grady.

Fred

Nostroke
07-30-2004, 12:20 PM
You are right Fred. When Allison and Grady came to my town, they stayed an extra day and they came back to the Pool Room. Gerda was with them. I hung out for a couple of hours as Grady taught them shot after shot including lots of banks. They were totally in the dark on many of them and were obviously very pleased with what they were learning.

I learned that Grady likes to overcut most banks and straighten them out with English to make for a bigger pocket. I had figured this out myself previously but still missed more this way than no english so i still dont use this shot unless i have to to avoid a kiss.

This game is so crazy-I have never been able to make a ball with approx a 15 degree cut when it is maybe 10-14 inches from the corner pocket and the cueball is more than 5 feet away using outside english. Overcut it everytime and my brain refuses to learn. I make table length banks more often and long rail banks 3 times as often easily. Go Figure.

Ross
07-30-2004, 02:21 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Nostroke:</font><hr> ...

This game is so crazy-I have never been able to make a ball with approx a 15 degree cut when it is maybe 10-14 inches from the corner pocket and the cueball is more than 5 feet away using outside english. Overcut it everytime and my brain refuses to learn. I make table length banks more often and long rail banks 3 times as often easily. Go Figure. <hr /></blockquote>

I have the same problem with this exact shot (especially when cutting to the left), but doesn't matter the english. I make it perfectly 4 out 5 times, but that 5th time I just overcut it into the rail and I haven't been able to figure out why so it drives me crazy. I do aim at the proper point on the pocket (the facing, not the back). It's like my slice in golf - if I try to "not slice" I make it worse. I would rather make a 70 degree cut than this stupid shot. BTW, I don't think I've EVER seen this specific shot UNDERcut in a real game, but I see it overcut daily.

I think it may have something to do with subtle changes in alignment when bridging next to the long rail.

Here's the shot, that should be routine:

START(
%AN7O5%BL7P8%CJ5O4%DL7N1%EM7P1%FK6P1%GK6N8%HM4Y1%I L7O4%Pk1Y2
%WF5[5%XL6Y4%[N6Y2%\i9Y2
)END

phil in sofla
07-30-2004, 03:11 PM
Not sure which instruction video advocated this, probably one of Jimmy Reid's.

The idea is to place the grip hand at the same hip, and use the line that creates to find the line of sight (which assume you are the same eye-dominant as you are handed.

Now, this is while still standing up, and initially setting your feet. If you then go to 'present arms' or 'quarter arms' position, whatever it's callled, you still have to step into (or back into, whatever) the final foot position.

I like the hip idea instead of the 'mid-pec' marker, whatever, because it is more concrete, and less subject to small variances (unless you're swiftly packing on pounds in the hip area, I guess, LOL!).

pooltchr
08-01-2004, 05:28 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> Wally...Alison and Gerda both attended RandyG's pool school in Dallas a couple of years ago. I'm sure that had a LOT to do with their improvement!

BTW, did you get your tape?

Scott <hr /></blockquote>

I believe Karen spent some time with Randy as well.
Steve
BTW...Scott...did you ever get that missing cue back?

justbrake
08-02-2004, 11:28 AM
I like the hip idea instead of the 'mid-pec' marker, whatever, because it is more concrete, and less subject to small variances (unless you're swiftly packing on pounds in the hip area, I guess, LOL!). <hr /></blockquote>

what is the hit idea exactly! what pool video shows it or is there pictures of it some where!

Cueless Joey
08-02-2004, 12:22 PM
I used to line up with my right pelvic bone as well.
But, I got out of line often because when I went down, it screwed up my alignment.
Aligning with the chest or any upper body part for that matter makes more sense to me b/c you are down when you line that body part up.
I just place the legs steadily where they naturally fall.

Scott Lee
08-02-2004, 12:37 PM
Steve...Not yet. The person who has it has been charged with receiving stolen property, but has yet to return the cue to me. We'll see what happens.

Scott

RedHell
08-02-2004, 01:05 PM
Straight from Allison's web site:

[ QUOTE ]
Allison began in the world of cue sports at the tender age of seven by watching snooker on television. She loved it so much that her parents bought a 1-foot long table for her to play on. By the age of 12, she had outgrown her tiny table and moved to a 6'x12' Snooker table. She joined a league at 13. <font color="red"> She began working with a coach, Frank Callan, to whom she gives significant credit.</font color> By 15, she won her first National title, and at 17, won her first World Championship. From 1983 to 1995, Allison won over 80 National titles, 11 World Championships, including three Mixed Doubles and the only Ladies Mixed Doubles ever held. <hr /></blockquote>

Nostroke
08-03-2004, 09:00 AM
Ross-You have diagrammed the shot that is absolutely the toughest for me (of that general shot). Even if you move the CB &amp; OB 4 inches out and 4 inches down- i still miss it regularly especially with follow and outside which i think is the usual shot in this position. Very frustrating.

phil in sofla
08-03-2004, 04:07 PM
I had originally thought this was something from Jimmy Reid's excellent series, No Time For Negatives.

Upon reflection, I think it is something CJ Wiley shows in his 3 tape series.

Basicallly, you just hold the cue in your normal grip position to the side of your body, rubbing against your hip, as you sight the line, prior to getting down on the shot. Using that body landmark SHOULD align the cue with your dominant eye (assuming you have the same dominant eye as your handedness) once you step into the shot.

Cueless Joey
08-03-2004, 04:18 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> I had originally thought this was something from Jimmy Reid's excellent series, No Time For Negatives.

Upon reflection, I think it is something CJ Wiley shows in his 3 tape series.

Basicallly, you just hold the cue in your normal grip position to the side of your body, rubbing against your hip, as you sight the line, prior to getting down on the shot. Using that body landmark SHOULD align the cue with your dominant eye (assuming you have the same dominant eye as your handedness) once you step into the shot. <hr /></blockquote>
That works b/c it just dawned on me (last night on my table) the area in the chest I was lining up is directly under my right eye.
Duh! /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif