PDA

View Full Version : I think i figured the game out



1a2b3c
07-31-2004, 09:45 AM
Last night i was shooting pool, and drinking. Normally this would make me play like sh*t....but i figured the game out. Anything and everything i shot at went down. Whats it called when all you see is the game and nothing can bother you? Well thats what it was like. All it took was the ex to roll into the bar and yell at me. Anger gave me the dead stroke, or whatever its called. I didnt just want to beat the people i was playing, i wanted to kill them. I wanted a 15 and 0 every game and i just about got it every game. I was getting more and more pissed the longer she stayed at the bar. And i was talking all kinds of sh*t to everyone i was playing. I was of course a total a**hole but hey, it worked. So if you wanna know how to get the self induced dead stroke...just have the ex wife roll into the poolhall and yell at you. It worked for me, even with the alcohol. I couldnt miss if i tried. You guys who are divorced should try it some time. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Popcorn
07-31-2004, 09:59 AM
You may think your story amusing but it is not very pleasant to play with people who can't control their emotions A**holes as you say. I hope you plan on apologizing all the people you abused and offended in the bar that night. Sorry, I just have little sympathy with people who make their problems my problems. All you did was ruin someone else's night out with your selfish actions. Sorry for being so blunt.

1a2b3c
07-31-2004, 10:02 AM
I would but i will probably never see them again. I only went to that bar cause my buddy was in the band.

Dont worry about the bluntness. Sticks and stones may break my bones but whips and chains turn me on. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Popcorn
07-31-2004, 10:06 AM
I didn't expect you to take any responsibility. Sounds like your ex wife got the best of this deal. I was being serious, it is guys like you who make playing in bars such a horrible experience sometimes. You even justify it by saying basically, "Who cares I am never going back there again anyway". Real nice.

1a2b3c
07-31-2004, 10:27 AM
wrong side of the bed this morning? I didnt think i was that bad, just an a**hole compared to my normal happy go lucky self.

Chris Cass
07-31-2004, 04:03 PM
Sounds like she won too.

C.C.

Alfie
07-31-2004, 09:50 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1a2b3c:</font><hr> And i was talking all kinds of sh*t to everyone i was playing. I was of course a total a**hole but hey, it worked. So if you wanna know how to get the self induced dead stroke...<hr /></blockquote>Thanks but I'll pass. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

recoveryjones
07-31-2004, 10:20 PM
No comment on the drinking (I'm four years sober in AA)or wife fighting(I'm divorced).I will comment on the title of your post"I think I figured the Game Out."

Several times I've went into Deadstroke and played (for me)unbelievable. It was at those times that I finally thought I had this game figured out, only to find out this game has returned to humble me.Be careful because it(deadstroke) most likely won't return every time you think it will. RJ

Cane
08-01-2004, 01:54 PM
Personally, after three divorces, I'm beyond a woman making me mad enough to do anything different in my pool game. I just accept the fact that I'm wrong, they're right, then I leave and go play pool somewhere.

I drink on very rare occasions (run a pool room, sports bar combination and you'll quickly turn to sobriety!!!) only enjoying a nice Guiness from time to time, and I hate "dead stroke". I conciously think out every shot and it's consequenses. I don't do it slow, I walk at a quick pace from shot to shot, chalk my cue, think through the next two balls and get it done. Dead stroke, or "free wheeling" has one good point in that you are shooting completely unconcious and can run a rack and not remember a single shot in it. Bad part is that if you do miss, you don't remember that either, and therefore don't remember why you missed and how to correct it the next time that shot comes up.

Personally, I'd rather be sober and polite and think through every shot like it was for the set. Think well, aim well, stroke well and win!!!

The only time I'm not polite is when someone comes into my bar or my poolroom and acts like an a$$hole and talks s#!t to my other customers and players. I then become VERY rude and obnoxious as me and my equally large staff escort them to the exit, on the way to which we take a polaroid picture of them so that our bartenders and waitstaff can recognize those who are permanently barred from our establishment.

Bob

BillPorter
08-02-2004, 03:00 AM
I think you make a good point that many of us, if we just think back, will agree with. We all know the emotion that can destroy our stroke and our game---FEAR. Fear narrows our vision, literally and figuratively. Fear shortens our stroke and keeps us from finding creative solutions to layouts on the pool table. In terms of time orientation, fear is a future-oriented emotion; we are anxious about something that may happen in the <font color="red">future</font color>. On the other hand, anger tends to put us and keep us in the present moment. We are angry about someone or something that is here and <font color="red">now</font color>. Sort of reminds me of that scene in the movie The Hustler when Fast Eddie raises his game on a billiard table to beat the gentleman in Louisville. This happens after girlfriend problems creates some anger.

Anyway...I just felt a bit bad for 1a2b3c when I saw that the replies to his post were mostly just criticisms of his behavior and paid little attention to what, at least to me, seemed to be the central point. Namely, that anger (turned outward, not anger at ones self!) can actually raise your game a level or two. Most of us have experienced that, right? After all, in competition, don't they talk about some players never rising to their potential because they lack a "killer punch?" Just my $.02 worth.

highsea
08-02-2004, 03:41 AM
I understand what you say about anger helping your focus. A little story. I used to shoot a lot of trap and skeet. On one of my Sunday tournaments, the Vice President of my trap club was woofing at me before the shoot, and he got me pretty pissed off. I went outside to cool off, and I made the decision to win the shoot that day, just to get even. (I had never won a trap event up to then) I went back inside the club and bet all the money in my pocket on every option on myself.

The day was not a good shooting day. There was about a 15-20 mph. gusty crosswind, and as soon as the targets left the trap house and got a little elevation, the wind would grab them and they would go crazy. I was shooting in the last group of the event, and the best score up to that point was 93/100.

My first round I dropped 4 targets. The next round I dropped the first 2. The targets were just jumping all over the place, and I realized it was all going down the toilet. I thought about the VP's remarks, and got mad all over again. I beared down and ran the last 73 targets without a miss. My focus was complete. I was on autopilot, not thinking about anything, just focusing on where the target was going to appear. I didn't let the targets get 10 yards out of the house before I nailed them.

I walked out of the clubhouse with over $500 bucks and the trophy that day.

But what I didn't do was talk $hit to the other shooters, or act in an unsportsmanlike manner. I let the win do my talking for me. 1a2b3c, while he may have channeled his emotions and played his best pool, did not do himself or anyone else any favors by acting the way he did. If you can't win and lose with grace, you should not be playing the game. JMO.

-CM

BillPorter
08-02-2004, 05:20 AM
highsea, that's a good story! I think your make a good point when you say that you didn't "talk $hit to the other shooters, or act in an unsportsmanlike mannerr." You had the anger, and the anger produced a high level of focus in the here and now, but you didn't <font color="red">show</font color> your anger as 1a2b3c did. I just think it is interesting how anger can sometimes (not always!) bring out your highest level of performance. As I said in my earlier post, if nothing else, anger displaces fear and when angry we don't choke as much.

Popcorn
08-02-2004, 09:12 AM
Quote
"Anyway...I just felt a bit bad for 1a2b3c when I saw that the replies to his post were mostly just criticisms of his behavior and paid little attention to what, at least to me, seemed to be the central point. Namely, that anger (turned outward, not anger at ones self!) can actually raise your game a level or two. Most of us have experienced that, right? After all, in competition, don't they talk about some players never rising to their potential because they lack a "killer punch?" Just my $.02 worth."

Beine angry is not going to make you a better player or raise your game.
There is anger and then there is self control. I am not sure I buy the blind anger argument or I did not know what I was doing excuse. People who claim they could not control themselves only seem to do it when they can get away with it, they pick their spots as to when they lose control. It is usually beating their wife or some innocent person who did not see it coming. You never read a story about a guy jumping out of his car because he was cut off, if the other driver is a 6 foot 6 biker type. They know what they are doing when they act like a** holes and I have no sympathy or problems pointing it out. In his case I think it should be pointed out, who knows, maybe he will think twice the next time he has the urge to act like that, I am sure that was not the first. I may not have addressed his original point, (which I got), I used the opportunity to address what I felt was a more important point. People like that just make playing pool in the social environment or a bar miserable.

BillPorter
08-02-2004, 10:43 AM
Popcorn, I understand the point you are making. And you probably understood mine as well. BTW, I'm not talking about extreme anger or rage raising the level of your pool game. Just a level of anger that at its mildest might be termed "determination." Ever see someone, just after they have lost some cash and they are sort of fuming and hitting balls (it seems the winners never hang around and bang balls /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif), often slamming them pretty hard into the pockets? Maybe a notch or two below that level of anger. And my main point was that even mild anger doesn't coexist well with anxiety and therefore reduces the choke factor. Peace...

Popcorn
08-02-2004, 11:23 AM
I think the choke factor has to do with not knowing you are not a dog. A lot of players once they begin going down the drain pull up. It becomes something they begin to believe is a part of their game. You have to at times just play through it and learn it is not a terminal condition, everybody does it but it does not define what they are. Getting back to the anger thing, you may just get pissed and not care any more about losing and just play. That is what I think you were talking about. It is a real learning experience and you find out you can get out of that dog state and back to your game. The player finds there are highs and lows but you need to hang on and if you are in fact the best player, you will win.

Surviving one of those sessions even just once can change your whole game. I know a player that is mentioned on here from time to time, not a poster. He was always a good player but not a real winner. He needed way the best of it to be sure he would win. It all changed in one night. He was playing a guy, a very good player and was stuck as usual and he ran out of money. He asked if he could borrow $2000 and said he had money in the bank and if he lost it I would get it back first thing in the morning. I had to borrow some of the money myself and stood good for it and gave him the money. He asked the guy he if he wanted to change the game from $200. races to 7, to straight up play $100. a game 9-ball. The guy agreed and my friend busted the guy. He just did not give a s**t anymore and played his heart out. Screw, constantly worrying about the score or the money, he just played. From that night on, that block was removed. I never saw him lose when he should win again. His game really jumped, he was finally letting it happen and it took place in just one night. It probably happens in tournaments as well. a guy wins a tournament and realizes he can do it and becomes a tougher competitor after that. Most people who enter tournaments can't see themselves winning, but one win changes all that.

Frank_Glenn
08-02-2004, 11:58 AM
[ QUOTE ]
It probably happens in tournaments as well. a guy wins a tournament and realizes he can do it and becomes a tougher competitor after that. Most people who enter tournaments can't see themselves winning, but one win changes all that.
<hr /></blockquote>
I call this the wall. Once you break through the wall, you have given yourself permission to win. Once you do this, your game goes to a new plateau. You hit many walls, and some are harder to break through, but once you understand this, it's just a matter of doing it. IMO, of course.

Chris Cass
08-02-2004, 12:10 PM
Oh Man Frank,

I can't tell you and Popcorn how right you are. It's after doing this it becomes clear what's needed to win after that. It boosts your confidence level and it doesn't stop from there. Something clicked in Buddy Hall and then he seemed to take off every event he entered. I've seen it in even smaller events. The ones I get into I've seen many players going up in tournament play. I like it when I see a player that knows they can do it if they really want to win. I can't wait till Heide takes off the IA State singles. That night I'll be so proud of her. Well, I'll say the happiest because I'm already proud of what shes been doing lately. It's scarry. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Carol Clark is another that comes to mind. Her recent 3rd place win tells her and me that she was there. Bet she's gonna take off something soon too.

Regards,

C.C.~~great posts.......

BillPorter
08-03-2004, 03:45 PM
Popcorn, I've thought a lot about your post, which was a very good one as usual. I definitely know what you mean when you say that you can, "get out of that dog state and back to your game." There was a time when, if I dogged a few shots, I'd say to myself, "here we go again, I'm choking up, there's no way I can win now." It was a big step upward to realize that you can dog a shot and come back from it, that you don't have to stay in that "dog state" through the whole session. As for your friend, the one who borrowed the $2,000 to play on, I've seen that go both ways. Sometimes they sink and sometimes they swim.

Popcorn
08-03-2004, 04:38 PM
You know, even if he blew the $2000. he was at least in a frame of mind that made it possible for him to win. If the other player is too much for him, then so be, he can live with that. In the case of my story the money was a pretty significant amount, but it could be as little as an entry fee in a tournament. The idea is, you have to learn something about yourself and what you can do. This transcends far more things then just a pool game. In everything people need to give themselves a chance to succeed.

1a2b3c
08-03-2004, 04:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BillPorter:</font><hr> I think you make a good point that many of us, if we just think back, will agree with. We all know the emotion that can destroy our stroke and our game---FEAR. Fear narrows our vision, literally and figuratively. Fear shortens our stroke and keeps us from finding creative solutions to layouts on the pool table. In terms of time orientation, fear is a future-oriented emotion; we are anxious about something that may happen in the <font color="red">future</font color>. On the other hand, anger tends to put us and keep us in the present moment. We are angry about someone or something that is here and <font color="red">now</font color>. Sort of reminds me of that scene in the movie The Hustler when Fast Eddie raises his game on a billiard table to beat the gentleman in Louisville. This happens after girlfriend problems creates some anger.

Anyway...I just felt a bit bad for 1a2b3c when I saw that the replies to his post were mostly just criticisms of his behavior and paid little attention to what, at least to me, seemed to be the central point. Namely, that anger (turned outward, not anger at ones self!) can actually raise your game a level or two. Most of us have experienced that, right? After all, in competition, don't they talk about some players never rising to their potential because they lack a "killer punch?" Just my $.02 worth. <hr /></blockquote>


Let me start by saying i cant believe this post is still on the front page.

Now, yes thats what i was trying to say. Of course i was kind of an [censored], but not to everyone. I still BSed with the guys i was playing with before she came in. They even noticed a definate change in my game. Yeah i think you hit the nail on the head. Fear makes me play like [censored]. WHen i know i am playing a "name" player around here i seem to let the whole "name" thing throw me off my game. I rarely ever get mad so i never really played mad. It definatly helped my game. I was dropping shots that i would normal even be scared to shoot at.

I have a buddy i shoot with who gets angry at the person he is playing. If you wanna beat him your best bet is not to piss him off, otherwise he cant be stopped. I can always tell when someone pissed him off cause he will start calling every shot no matter how obvious it is. Its funny to me. He use to do it to me when i would mess with him (when i first moved here) but he kinda quit when he noticed i WANT to play someone who is better than me. But yeah, anger gets his game going to.

Maybe youre not to far off from this killer punch idea. Maybe i should always look at the other guy playing and find a reason to be angry with him. I dont get angry often but maybe i could work something up. I just need to visualize that he is the enemy and he is insulting me for thinking he has enough game to play at my table. Maybe that might work???

BillPorter
08-03-2004, 06:33 PM
One way of looking at it is that your friend could have lived with the fact that he lost because his opponent was a better player, but neither he nor any of us want to live with the knowledge that we lost because we beat ourselves. Because something within us kept us from playing our best game. I've laid awake nights agonizing over a loss caused by choking on a critical shot, but I don't recall losing much sleep over being beaten by an opponent that simply outplayed me when I was playing near the top of my game. And, as you say, this goes way beyond the "green felt." I suppose more failures in life are caused by internal factors (self-doubt, fear, lack of motivation, etc.) than external ones. What's that old saying, the most significant battles are always those fought within ourselves? But doesn't it feel GREAT when we win one of those battles, as your friend did that night? I often think that my pool playing is as much about gaining self-knowledge as anything else.

Wally_in_Cincy
08-04-2004, 06:39 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1a2b3c:</font><hr>
.....I have a buddy i shoot with who gets angry at the person he is playing. If you wanna beat him your best bet is not to piss him off, otherwise he cant be stopped. I can always tell when someone pissed him off cause he will start calling every shot no matter how obvious it is. Its funny to me.....<hr /></blockquote>

For some reason I don't see it as funny. Why don't you give me his name so I can make sure I never play him.

dude, it's just a stupid game.