PDA

View Full Version : The importance of memory



Leviathan
08-02-2004, 08:26 AM
How important is it to get in the habit of remembering where the cb and ob are before the shot is played and what routes the cb and ob take after the hit?

Good players seem to be able to reset positions accurately, and they often work on missed shots right after their matches. I think that beginners and intermediates rarely remember what actually happens with their shots. How you gonna learn anything from a shot you can't remember?

AS

=k=
08-02-2004, 08:51 AM
Leviathan, i rate this very high, that is why i like the black belt billiards drills so much, it makes me do shots and drills untill it is committed to memory, as someone on here once said the differance between a pro and a amature is a amature shoots untill he can make the shot and a pro shoots untill he can't miss the shot.......k

Frank_Glenn
08-02-2004, 08:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Leviathan:</font><hr> How important is it to get in the habit of remembering where the cb and ob are before the shot is played and what routes the cb and ob take after the hit?

Good players seem to be able to reset positions accurately, and they often work on missed shots right after their matches. I think that beginners and intermediates rarely remember what actually happens with their shots. How you gonna learn anything from a shot you can't remember?

AS <hr /></blockquote>

It is only important if you plan to make another shot. Oh, and if you don't want to scratch.

bill190
08-02-2004, 09:57 AM
The *most* important things I carry in my case are a pen and several pieces of blank paper. When I miss a critical shot or scratch, I diagram it on paper so I can practice this shot the next day. If it is just one key shot which made me lose a match, I usually don't need to write it down.

But writing down or remembering the missed shot is the easy part! (Identifying the problem) The hard part is finding and working on a solution. For example, I missed on the leave for two key draw shots on two separate evenings. In both situations it cost me the match.

I decided to do something about it so it would not happen again. I spent about three months experimenting with different tips and shaft sizes to get the best draw *and* play for all other shots. I settled on a 12.5mm shaft, Moori (Q), and dime shape. Since then I have practiced my draw shots once each week. Now I can draw the cue ball back as little or as far as I want time after time. So I go to all this work, then I play on a new Valley pool table which has cloth which is "Teflon" coated! Well balls draw differently on that cloth! UGGGGGHHHHH! Guess I need to practice on that specific cloth now...

RedHell
08-02-2004, 10:05 AM
I think if you want to work on your game, you must know what to work on.

In my case, I can't reset all the shots that I've played, made or mist. But everytime I miss a shot, I try to understand what went wrong, right there in the match. If I can't I commit this shot to memory and work on it right after the game, albeit 4 or 5 attempts if that's all time permits.

That allows me to remember the setup and I'm able to practice the shot a few days later.

I think you shouldn't try to remember all the shots, just make a concious decision of commiting a specific one or a couple to memory.

Nostroke
08-02-2004, 10:39 AM
Nothing to do with pool, but i think you should lose the "pieces of paper" and buy yourself a small notebook for less than a buck. Keep your notes there and then u can have them to refer to in the future. Pieces of paper always get lost, torn etc.I dont write anything on pieces of paper anymore.

Chris Cass
08-02-2004, 10:57 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote =k=:</font><hr> Leviathan, i rate this very high, that is why i like the black belt billiards drills so much, it makes me do shots and drills untill it is committed to memory, as someone on here once said the differance between a pro and a amature is a amature shoots untill he can make the shot and a pro shoots untill he can't miss the shot.......k <hr /></blockquote>

That was Dr. D. in I believe a tagline. It's those shots that mean so much is what you remember. I can narrow a lost set by one ball and one shot missed. Usually because the of the players I tend to play. They make you pay and I always remember the shot. I also remember what it is exactly what I did wrong.

Sometimes, I'll reset the shot and shoot it again but usually I just repair it in my mind and move on. Once in a great while I'll set up the shot and shoot it another way to see if I might have made a change in the outcome.

I've shot so many shots a certain way with a certain english or hit. I'll shoot them the same way everytime because, it's built into my memory as having already went through the trial and error part yrs ago but, every now and then I'll surprize myself by just trying another way and it'll work better. (longest sentence in history)

Regards,

C.C.

Chris Cass
08-02-2004, 11:18 AM
Hi Alan,

When your in a match. It pays to rethink the shot missed right then and there at the time that it's missed. Make the shot in your mind, as you won't be able to set it back up and shoot it, then. While fresh in your mind, in the match, shoot the shot, in your mind and make it. Then, store it in your mind as repaired.

Matches also, as one shot. If carried on in your mind as unfinished or even one match lost, can devistate your play the next match. Sometimes you can ruin your entire set over one shot. It's best to shoot it in your head and move on. You'll be able to recall this thought, when you run across the same shot later down the road and make it. Because it has been repaired and made, in your mind already. Think of the shot and see it going into the pocket mentally.

I know you weren't talking about it in that sence but thought I'd tell you my thoughts of how I do it. Most shots missed by all of us are the ones that we preceive as easy ones. None are really easy but we all seem to give less attention to the easier ones we shoot. That's why we make the harder ones. The harder shots require more focus and attention.

This maybe wrong advice? You might have to check with Vincent. LOL J/K Just my non-pro observation. I'm checking my puncuation, sentance structure and what I'm saying. I'm on pins and needles. LOL

Regards,

C.C.

woody_968
08-02-2004, 11:20 AM
Im gonna walk on the other side of the fence and say its not important at all, not during a match that is. I would much rather have my mind on something other than a shot I just missed.

During practice I will pay attention and set shots back up, I actually like to use the hole enforcer thingys (highly technical term) during practice to set up the shots exactly the same way to practice pocketing certain shots or finding different ways to play shape off of a shot.

Leviathan
08-02-2004, 12:07 PM
You know, I thought I had this subject figured out pretty well. I only raised the issue because I thought beginners ought to give it a little more thought. Ah, vanity! You guys have kicked in with some stuff I've never considered, a couple of things I'm going to try apply in my own game. So thanks for the good input! (An honest question usually gets a helpful response on this board--I like that.)

AS

Jimmy B
08-02-2004, 12:36 PM
It's always my advice to new players and people who want to get better that they need to really pay attention. This is what I mean. I think the way to learn what not to do (as well as what too do) is to really pay attention. You need to know every detail of the shot, where the balls lay where you hit the CB, then and only then will you know what happens and why, and then you can correct it or repeat it. I think it can do some damage also, if there is a shot you hit bad or always miss it will also stick in your head and cause you to second guess yourself when they come up in an important spot.

JB

buddha162
08-02-2004, 12:44 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Nostroke:</font><hr> Nothing to do with pool, but i think you should lose the "pieces of paper" and buy yourself a small notebook for less than a buck. Keep your notes there and then u can have them to refer to in the future. Pieces of paper always get lost, torn etc.I dont write anything on pieces of paper anymore. <hr /></blockquote>

That is sage advice, Davey!

-Roger

Rod
08-02-2004, 01:36 PM
Alan,

You develope a photographic memory per-say. You get in the habit of reference points such as a diamond or X amount of ball widths from a rail, pocket etc.

I can't tell you how many times someone missed or played a shot poorly, then showed it to me later. Problem is they set it up with totaly wrong reference points. They might get the angle close, which is important but the ball distance is wrong from a rail, pocket etc.

As an example a guy scratched on this shot in the side. First diamond and about a ball width from the rail.
START(
%AH3D8%BL7P8%CJ5O4%DL7N1%EM7P1%FK6P1%GK6N8%HM7N8%I L7O4%PU9T7
%UI3E0%VZ6Z7%eC3a9
)END

After he can't believe he scratched. Shows it to me and makes a good shot. Oh I can shoot that all day long and not scratch, he says. Problem is the o/b was not in the same location. Here is where he placed the o/b.
START(
%AI1E9%BL7P8%CJ5O4%DL7N1%EM7P1%FK6P1%GK6N8%HM7N8%I L7O4%PU9T7
%UH9E3%VZ6Z7%eC3a9
)END

Now it's approaching two ball widths from the rail which makes a huge difference. The c/b has more time to react before rail contact and will easily go past the side and with less speed. Depends on what your doing with the c/b but those slight differences is what you memorize. Put it in the memory bank for the next time.

Another part that is missed is appx speed and where the ball hits the pocket. If you hit it fat or thin the c/b takes a little different angle.

Thing is this game is all repetition. If you shoot that same shot--, angle, english, speed, distance from rail and pocket. You can shoot it to any pocket, either short or long rail and always get the same effect.

So yes it is important but the other factors are just as important. Learn where it goes with no english as a reference, then build from there.

Rod