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View Full Version : How much is too much to spend on a Cue?? Poll



RUNaRAK
08-04-2004, 01:48 PM
I am just curious because I say that the sky is the limit if you can afford it. Just curious what everyone thinks is too much.
Before the flaming starts, I know that an expensive cue with tons of ivory and fancy inlay will not make you a better player. But it is nice to have a cue that you can call unique and feel really good about.
Give us your opinion too!

nAz
08-04-2004, 01:57 PM
OMG we can do polls again!? since when?
i doubt that i would spend more then $600-$800 on a cue.

woody_968
08-04-2004, 03:04 PM
Well the big key is how much you have to spend. I have spent over 500, but to alot of people thats not even a start. If I had the extra money I could find several that I would spend over a thousand for. The one I play with now is worth well over a grand, but someone I know gave me a really good deal so I could afford it /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

dg-in-centralpa
08-04-2004, 03:31 PM
I spent over a grand on my cue and if I had the money, I wouldn't hesitate to spend more. Not that it will make me a better player, but for the looks and uniqueness. I live in a somewhat laid back, traditional town, where most people play with Meucci, Schon, or Heubler. Not much variety, a few somewhat exotics like Samsara, Richard Black, a couple old Palmers, and a Danbuilt.

DG - only 128,000 people in my county

Rod
08-04-2004, 07:02 PM
I won't buy a high dollar cue, just one more thing that is a target. I go to play not watch my cue/s like a buzzard. Not saying I don't watch as I've only lost one cue.

Ha Ha, it was a cheap old black Cuetech that I used for a break cue at the time. Never paid a dime for it and I didn't like it so they did me a favor. lol Besides most of them loose value so I consider it a bad investment.

Rod

AndreaWilson
08-04-2004, 07:35 PM
Keep in mind that everyone has their own budgets that they have to live by. If someone is limited and needs to save up, then they should at least be prepared to pay in the neighbourhood of $300 to get themselves in at the entry level with the most basic models of various better cue lines. They need a well balanced cue with a good joint and ferrule and a stable shaft that feels good in their hand. When you start paying bigger bucks you are paying for more decoration and in many cases, custom cues. While these options are wonderful I avoid steering novice players into these items until they are more in tune with the game and understand more about feedback and technique as well as proper cue care and maintenance.

I guess I was fortunate. I only paid $500 (CDN) Wholesale for my RC Helmstetter back in 1989. As a stroke of luck, a couple of year ago, down in Las Vegas I had it appraised because I was thinking of trading for a different cue.....probably due to a stagnation in my game. Anyways, I was told it was now a collectors item and with the predator shaft as well as the original shaft is now valued at over $4000 (CDN). All of a sudden the cue felt new to me again. I don't know what triggered the mental change, but all of a sudden I was very attached to the cue again and took to the tables with renewed vigor.

Mostly due to financial constraints, but if I had that money available, I would purchase a lower priced cue and be looking for another tournament to go and experience rather than spend that much money on a new cue. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

JPB
08-04-2004, 08:51 PM
I guess I have a threshold, but I don't know where it is exactly. I have spent over 1K and will spend around 5K some day I am sure. I don't think I could spend 25K or something unless I were sam walton bill gates rich I don't think. Maybe I am just cheap. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Chris Cass
08-04-2004, 11:52 PM
You had to bring up cue balls, didn't you? BRADYYYYYYYY

Regards,

C.C.~~20 bucks max or 10 and a 2 bucks for the red marker. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Rich R.
08-05-2004, 04:14 AM
When it comes to buying a cue, you have to treat it like any other luxury item, and yes, having your own cue is a luxury. Free cues are provided, for use, by the pool rooms. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

When buying any luxury item, you have to separate the "I need's" from the "I wants".

For example, when buying a car, you can by a VW or a Maserati. Both are high quality and both will get you from point "A" to point "B". However, one will look better and cost more.

It is the same when buying a cue. You can buy a high quality, basic custom cue, from many good cue makers, starting at about $300. Maybe a little more, depending on the cue maker. That is the "I need" level of cue.
After that, you get into the "I want" level of cue and the price climbs quickly and the sky is the limit. Everyone has to determine for themselves, where the climbing should end. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

catscradle
08-05-2004, 04:44 AM
I think probably in terms of playing better anything over say $3-500.00 is money thrown away. However, my current playing cue was more than that and if I had the $$$$ the sky probably would be the limit. I would probably be limited more by the fact that some of the fancier, more expensive stuff doesn't appeal to me aesthetically.

Chris Cass
08-05-2004, 09:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chris Cass:</font><hr> You had to bring up cue balls, didn't you? BRADYYYYYYYY

Regards,

C.C.~~20 bucks max or 10 and a 2 bucks for the red marker. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
<hr /></blockquote>

Well, you can see what's on my mind. LOL Cue balls. LOL I must be going blind.

Regards,

C.C.~~can't believe I didn't read that post right? Atleast I finally found the Billiard Workbook above. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

tateuts
08-05-2004, 11:12 AM
Anything over $10,000 is probably excessive.

/ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

SnakebyteXX
08-05-2004, 11:20 AM
If this is a question about the thing called 'buyer's remorse' then the answer is: you've spent too much if after you've bought the cue you feel that you paid too much for what you got because you find that you could have gotten it somewhere else for much less - or you find another cue that feels better to you when you play and it costs about the same as the one you bought but now you can't buy it because you don't have the money anymore and now you're stuck - or a smokin' deal for a used custom made cue that's worth three times what you paid for your new cue falls into your lap for about what you paid for your new cue and you can't buy it because you spent the money already and now you're bummed out. And on and on and on...

I have several rules of thumb when it comes to buying cues (or fly rods - or for that matter any good tools). Those rules are based on my life experience and my income. Starting with the fact that at this time in my life I can basically afford almost any cue on the market from Cuetecs to Szamboti's but also factoring in that I've only recently returned to shooting pool after an absence of many years.

Which brings me to Rule #1. Spend plenty of time shooting pool while trying out different cues to learn the hands-on difference between one cue and another BEFORE YOU BUY.

What that tells me is that after all this time of not playing I basically don't know a hell of a lot about what makes one cue stick different from another. So, is it still more important that I spend some time learning about those differences before I spend my hard earned money than the fact that I can afford to buy anything I want? You bet.

One the favorite expressions that an old pool playing buddy of mine used to use whenever I'd try to blame a bad shot on whatever pool cue I was using was: "A poor craftsman always blames his tools." Another way to say the same thing is that becoming a great craftsman doesn't depend entirely on the tools he uses. It depends more on the time he spends practicing his craft.

Which brings us to Rule #2: You can't ever buy a good game of pool - you can only earn it.

This means that it doesn't matter if you can spend $5000 for a custom made stick, if you weren't any good before you bought the cue paying five grand for it isn't going to instantly make you any better. You're still going to have to do the hard work of practice, practice, practice for your game to improve. There aren't any substitutes for practice - no amount of money spent on a fancy stick will change this - period. A beginning violin player does not go out shopping for a Stradivarius for his first violin thinking that it will instantly make him a concert violinist.

Rule #3: Try to understand the difference between what you actually need versus what you think you 'want'.

Do you need a stick that's reliable and that you can trust to get the job done - that has a weight and balance that feels good in your hands - and a shaft that's not too whippy or too stiff - then those factors should be placed ahead of appearance on the scale of what's important to you and THAT'S what you should be willing to pay a fair price to get.

You may think you want to play with flashy custom made cue because of the attention and the status it will bring to you - but are you ready for the burden of having to watch your cue like a hawk to make certain no one steals it when your back is turned? Are you ready to worry constantly about dinging the stick - chipping the butt or nicking it - or otherwise damaging the stick and possibly ruining its resale value during regular play?

Rule #4: NEVER over pay. Don't buy retail if you can avoid it.

There are scads and scads of used cues out there - many of them in 'as new condition' and most of them selling for half their original retail value or less. Take the time to look around - beat the bushes - use the Net to get a good idea of what a right price is for the model that you're looking at and then haggle for the best deal. Sometimes if you look hard enough you can even find brand new gear at below wholesale prices.

I've taken this approach in my cue quest and I haven't been at all disappointed. By looking I've managed to find brand new Cuetec's that normally retail for around $130 for fifty bucks - used Cuetec's with cases for forty. A brand new Meucci Gambler 1 that retails for over five hundred dollars for two hundred. A custom made Prather that retails for over nine hundred for three hundred (with a leather case and Predator 314 shaft thrown in no extra charge). A two hundred dollar Joss stick for fifty bucks. Blah, blah, blah...

Do NOT buy at retail if you think you can be just as happy with used gear that can be had at VERY affordable prices. I prefer to buy used gear because I feel that I get the biggest bang for my buck - not only that, but when it comes time to sell any of the gear I'm in a much better position to get my money back.

Hope this helps.

Snake

Eric.
08-05-2004, 11:41 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote AndreaWilson:</font><hr> I only paid $500 (CDN)... <hr /></blockquote>

That's around $6.50 US Dollars, right?


Eric &gt;teasing /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

AndreaWilson
08-05-2004, 12:06 PM
YA, YA, I'm a girl, so you won't get a rise out of me for that one.

Our dollar is climbing though. Unfortunately, our $2 coin looks like a Peso. In a hundred years it will all be the same as long as we don't have to pay for our daisies. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

scorchio
08-05-2004, 03:01 PM
I'm currently looking to buy a new cue and have set myself a budget of around $400. If i had more money then i would gladly spend a lot more on a cue.

Keith Talent
08-05-2004, 05:20 PM
Too much ain't enough, as I think they say in Texas. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

mudshark
08-05-2004, 08:12 PM
You know when it comes down to it I think this is just personal preference. I own a cuetec cue and I would swear by it, and this was before strickland and fisher used them. But I know a lot of people don't like them. I am actually in the market for a new stick, and have no idea what to by since I don't like any of cuetec current models. I am more of a solid color guy, and my favorite color is green. That should tell you how long I have had my cue.

Chris Cass
08-06-2004, 12:07 AM
Hi Scorchio,

I can't believe what I'm hearing about what you should think you should pay or what it takes to buy a custom jobber. I never thought of a cue as a money thing. I liked the Meucci when coming up and found one that was beat and used. A $90. list cue bottom line and bought it for $40. or $35. it was cheap. It still had the hit I was looking for and I shot well with it. Times were great. I didn't have to worry about dinging it and just worried about making balls. I didn't care about resale either. I just cared about it warping.

I shattered that puppy one day after a frustating time with my new girl calling me in the middle of a $2. a game 9 ball in a bar. She must have called me 4 times to come over. Whined and moaned everytime. After shattering it outside, even though I was just trying to shatter the velvet inside balsa wood fake leather case she bought me. Well, the cue broke too. The next day I was looking for a cue again. Only I had $6. to look for another.

Find a cue that hits great to you. Then, find a used one that the same guy makes and no matter the condition, buy it. You can't go wrong.

Regards,

C.C.

nhp
08-06-2004, 05:46 AM
I bought a gorgeous one-of-a-kind Tad cue for $15,000.















and then I woke up.

T_squared
08-06-2004, 02:54 PM
Heh, heh, heh,....nice dream! And of course that means you're driving around in a Mercedes (sp?) and living in a 4,000 sq ft estate......wouldn't it be nice?

But while we're awake, I say spend $200 -$400 for a well-reputed production que and focus on making time to play and practice. If you're a player, then go play. If you're an art collector, then maybe cost is less of an issue. If you're a real good player and want to flaunt it with a multi-thousand dollar stick, then maybe that extra cost is worth it if it adds to the excitement of the game. But as others are saying, the high-dollar custom ques don't have any mechanical extra features that give an advantage to the owners.

Those issues about theft concerns, damage concerns, and maybe looking like a fool concerns can slowly add up to reduce the enjoyment of going out and playing pool.

I ordered a McDermott Montana over the internet from Cues-4-Less, and have been real happy with it. It's somewhat plain, no points or exotic materials. BUT it's so nicely finished, has a comfortable feel, balance, and smooth hit.

Now I frequently think about how nice that que feels and looks, and I make a stronger effort to make time to use it. I don't even hardly remember the reasonable cost (less than $250), and I don't worry too much about what might happen to it. Now all I want to do is make the opportunities to USE it! And since it's not very flashy, I don't even think about how sad it may seem when I can't run more than 3 balls some evenings.

Pelican
08-06-2004, 05:04 PM
For shooting a fine cue can be obtained for under 300. I recently got an Auerbach for 175 that shoots great. For investment, depends on the cue. Someone posted that they don't usually appreciate. Goes to the cue. Bought a Richard Black 30th anniversary this year and have already been offered a tidy profit if I wanted to sell, nope don't want to. There is always a market for quality.

Later, Pel

Barbara
08-06-2004, 05:41 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote RUNaRAK:</font><hr>

I am just curious because I say that the sky is the limit if you can afford it. Just curious what everyone thinks is too much.
Before the flaming starts, I know that an expensive cue with tons of ivory and fancy inlay will not make you a better player. But it is nice to have a cue that you can call unique and feel really good about.
Give us your opinion too!
<hr /></blockquote>

All I can say is, I waited my whole life to get that cue and it cost me every cent I had!!! OH YEAH!!

And loving every minute I spend with it!!!

Barbara

scorchio
08-07-2004, 02:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chris Cass:</font><hr> Hi Scorchio,

I can't believe what I'm hearing about what you should think you should pay or what it takes to buy a custom jobber. I never thought of a cue as a money thing. I liked the Meucci when coming up and found one that was beat and used. A $90. list cue bottom line and bought it for $40. or $35. it was cheap. It still had the hit I was looking for and I shot well with it. Times were great. I didn't have to worry about dinging it and just worried about making balls. I didn't care about resale either. I just cared about it warping.

I shattered that puppy one day after a frustating time with my new girl calling me in the middle of a $2. a game 9 ball in a bar. She must have called me 4 times to come over. Whined and moaned everytime. After shattering it outside, even though I was just trying to shatter the velvet inside balsa wood fake leather case she bought me. Well, the cue broke too. The next day I was looking for a cue again. Only I had $6. to look for another.

Find a cue that hits great to you. Then, find a used one that the same guy makes and no matter the condition, buy it. You can't go wrong.

Regards,

C.C. <hr /></blockquote>

Thanx for the advice,i really appreciate it.

The problem is that living in the U.K you don't really get many chances to shoot with good quality cues at all. I've had a go with a Cuetec-which i really didn't like and a Mezz-which i absolutly loved! When i first started looking a few of months ago i relly wanted a Mezz or a Meucci, but after reading all the horror storys that people have had with Meuccis i've really been put off them. So its going to be a Mezz i think, but in all the time i've been looking i've only seen 2 for sale on e-bay and both time i wasn't in a position to buy them /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif I'm hoping with the reputation for quality that Mezz has this cue will last me a long, long time.

BLACKHEART
08-07-2004, 05:39 AM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gifBarb, what in the world is that picture, below your name? I just can't figure it out...JER

Barbara
08-07-2004, 06:53 AM
Jer,

It's a Mattel Nimbus 2000. The very broom that Harry Potter uses to play Quiddich. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Now tell me what you think about SPetty's avatar.

Barbara

BLACKHEART
08-07-2004, 08:27 AM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif So that's why Harry ordered a crooked Q instead of a straight one. Oh well, I guess it's all in what you get used to...JER

Wally_in_Cincy
08-07-2004, 08:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BLACKHEART:</font><hr> /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gifBarb, what in the world is that picture, below your name? I just can't figure it out...JER <hr /></blockquote>

JER,

read all about it /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif (http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Board=npr&amp;Number=149945&amp;page =6&amp;view=expanded&amp;sb=6&amp;o=7&amp;fpart=1)

bill190
08-07-2004, 09:24 AM
Usually with everything else I buy, I'll pay for quality, but not for a name or a label. If I can buy a quality shoe at Walmart for $10 (fits well and lasts a long time), then no need to go elsewhere or spend more. Just does not say Nike on it is all!

For pool cues, I know enough now so that I want a cue made to my specifications. This would be ferrule, taper, shaft end size, joint screw, joint rings, wrap, color, and weight. The tip I can always replace.

So that stuff is most important as well as quality work and materials used. I don't care for a fancy look since it would more likely be ripped off. Also I don't want a sneaky pete because other people will think it is a house cue and play with it when I'm not looking.

Now if it costs $1,000.00 to get the exact cue I want, then that is OK. But I won't spend more for anything like inlays or rare wood. I will spend more for the best shaft wood though.

I don't mind taking an existing cue to a cuemaker and paying a few hundred dollars to have it modified to my liking, and have done this.

So how the thing plays = very important.
How it looks = not important except color.

Chris Cass
08-07-2004, 09:52 AM
Hi Scorchio,

I can't understand why you can get a Meucci or other cues out there by you. If it's the cost in shipping or something like that I can see why it might be difficult. However, the Meucci isn't a bad cue at all. I think they play good. They do have some whip in the shafts but I think it's up to the player really. The only thing when buying a Meucci that might be a problem. Is that you must visually check the joint rings for missing glue or gaps and check out the overall appearence of the inlays. Just to make sure your getting something decnt without worrying about them popping up.

I also don't care too much for the finishes. Not that they feel bad but they turn ugly around the wrap area after a longtime. Also, the finish turns yellow over the white plastic used for inlays.

I don't mean plastic in a bad way either. They make some good looking cues imho. I say, go for it bro.

Regards,

C.C.

scorchio
08-07-2004, 09:48 PM
Well getting any cue out here really isnt a problem, apart from shipping and taxes /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif But like you said the problem is not being able to check the actual workmanship on the cue. Just been looking on ebay and theres a couple of older Meucci's on there, with the ==meucci==original== logo on the butt cap. I am tempted to get on of these as i've been told that the older cues don't have the quality issues that the newer Meucci's have, someone please correct me if i'm wrong!!

Chris Cass
08-07-2004, 11:31 PM
Well,

I don't know about that? Seems the older ones had many flaws. Bob was just starting out back then. Another helpfull note, I don't think that the older cues really went up in value at all either. Myself, I think Bob has gotten better about what he's turning out.

Granted, they're not as durable as a McDermott lets say but unless your hard on a cue? It wouldn't matter all that much. I like the new styles and colors too. I haven't hit with one for so many yrs that I really couldn't make a fair judgement.

Ever think about looking into a Blackheart? The owner and cuemaker himself posts here. That's a good thing. He can post a pic of the cue he made for Carol another poster here. It's beautiful too. She can tell you how it hits and the craftsmenship put into the cue and JER from Blackheart can tell you anything else.

Regards,

C.C.

SPetty
08-08-2004, 10:39 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chris Cass:</font><hr> Blackheart? ...post a pic of the cue he made for Carol another poster here. It's beautiful too.<hr /></blockquote> http://members.aol.com/iheart8ball/pics/CarolsCue/cue.jpg

Rich R.
08-08-2004, 12:24 PM
This cue looks even better, if that is possible, up close and personal. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

BoBB
08-08-2004, 01:18 PM
I'm actually going through this same problem right now :P Although I am leaning towords getting the cue that I want not the best for the cheapest. Im not very good at pool just yet, but I think a decent cue will help my progress alot. Im currently using a crooked $30 cue from sports authority =/ I usually end up playing with a house cue if I can find a good one. But I went through a long debate over buying a &lt; $200 production cue and getting the cue I really want, a custom kieth josey, im leaning towords the josey mostly because I like unique things. But in my opinion I say spend whatever you can afford on the best cue possible, looks should take a back seat to the play of the cue, however if you got an extra 3-4 grand for a cue by all means blow it on a skip or a gilbert as long as its what you want, but dont spend the rent money on a cue unless you can make the money back :P

Malice
08-08-2004, 01:56 PM
I take pride in my cue, and for me I can't think of any amount as being too much to pay if you can afford it.

My main playing cue is about $1,000, and I'm considering buying another for about $800. I'm hoping one day to buy a fancy Joss West, which I figure could cost as much as $5k.

Chris Cass
08-08-2004, 08:53 PM
Hey Bobb,

You can get a Gilbert for about $300., $250. for a break/Jump. It'll be a plane jane but it'll hit good. I think your thinking smart. You should only spend inbetween the 1-2 hundred range. Anything higher would be a bit much for the adjusting to the game. Maybe when your into it for a couple more yrs then, pop for the 3-5 range.

JAT,

C.C.

BoBB
08-09-2004, 05:43 PM
You think it would be to much? When I first decided to take it seriously and buy a real cue, I was going to get a low end kieth josey at first around $240, but I figured i might as well get the cue I would want once im a "good player" since its not to much more.

Chris Cass
08-09-2004, 11:09 PM
Naw Man,

Get what you think you can afford to without killing yourself is what I'm saying. I've heard a great deal about Keiths cues and all good. If you got the $240. then, go for it. I was just thinking of you saving a few bucks and finding the maker you liked.

If you were to find that same cue only beat to $hit, I would recommend it because I know the hit is what counts. Not all the cosmetic stuff. Even a plane jane in new condition is a luxury in my eyes. A beat up plane jane is good enough. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif Go for it dude.

Regards,

C.C.

Rod
08-09-2004, 11:18 PM
Hey CC,

Mine are kinda plain and beat up, I done good huh? /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

~~ rod, is beat up also

recoveryjones
08-09-2004, 11:46 PM
I just bought a Layani cue for under $1000 Canadian. I stayed within my budget and I got a great hitting cue.
(If you haven't tried a Layani, give one a try.)
http://www.layanicues.com/

I say to spend whatever you can afford to get "THAT HIT" you are looking for.Spend the money on a cue that feels good in your hands and hits great.A beautiful cue that doesn't hit great isn't going to help you win any matches.

Mine is a real nice looking cue, however, it is one of the lower priced Layani's. If I had more money in my budget, who knows maybe I would have got something fancier, however, I'm also very pleased with the way my cue looks.

Go for "THE HIT" first, spend whatever you can afford to get that hit, and consider every thing else a bonus.If you can get a great looking cue that hits great and can afford it, more power to ya. RJ

Rod
08-10-2004, 12:19 AM
Rj,

Many don't know what "that hit" is and they won't unless they try a few cues and tips. "That hit" as it's so often called, (not by me), seems can not be identified. Most times I just hear it "hits" good, solid, stiff, whatever. What is stiff to someone might feel like a limp noodle to me or others. It's so subjective that using "hit" means little but that seems to be the trend.

At any rate I can spend ten bucks or less on a tip and find what I'm looking for even if the cue is not high dollar.
I'm saying, I like the weight, balance, shaft size/taper and tip properties, that's the main components. To "the hit" you refer to. The rest makes a difference but it's minor. So if you know what you like then "the hit" will be there.

Rod

Rod
08-10-2004, 12:22 AM
How many times was "the hit" used in both posts? LOL

Chris Cass
08-10-2004, 07:30 AM
Rod,

Your doing good. No sence in doing what I have to do. That's taking my cue to the john, asking people to watch my case, everytime down on the ball, wondering if some drunk rec players going to wack my cue by accident, worry about, when I lay the cue on the table, while I'm racking and the bozo I'm playing, will roll the cb down and hit it, fights breaking out in the place I'm shooting, laying it down when I'm using a break cue and some bubble head comes over thinking it's a house cue. Like the hall has S.W. and Boti's for house cues. Not to mention, those who make a big deal of what the cues worth without telling them and their like announcing it in front of a room filled with guys that kill for 20 bucks. People trying to jump ya in the parking lot. Oh ya, this is good for your focus.

Yep, I think ya did good brother.

Regards,

C.C.~~your not beat up. Your a stud muffin like me. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

recoveryjones
08-10-2004, 07:30 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rod:</font><hr> How many times was "the hit" used in both posts? LOL <hr /></blockquote>

I used the "hit" word 5 times.

Ok Rod, I overdid it on that hit word, I admit it, guilty as charged...lol.I guess I got carried away because I'm lovin my new cue. My main point was get something that plays nice and helps your game.If it costs you a few extra bucks to obtain that, spend what you can within reason to your budget.RJ

Chris Cass
08-10-2004, 07:44 AM
Duh,

I just got your drift. hahahaha You shoot with a Schon don't you? I love your sence of humor Rod.

The HIT: aaaa It's what you as a person likes when the cue tip hits the ball and your holding it. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif Lmao

C.C.~~smarty pants today. HAHAHAHA

JackPot_George
08-10-2004, 08:43 AM
As a great man said once:

"It's not the stick, is the man behind the stroke"

With that, you can assume any price as long as you know how to use it.

Rod
08-10-2004, 10:41 AM
No problem RJ. lol It's just I hear the hit used in every context imaginable. Let's see ----

Lets go hit some
I hit with -
How's it hit?
Get that hit
It hits good
It's a good hitting -
It has the best hit
It is the best hitting -
It hit's stiff
Go for the hit
It hits soft
It hits like a limp noodle
Doesn't hit good/well/great/etc.

It goes on but hit in most all thse cases it is substituted for the word "feel". Like CC says -- The HIT: aaaa It's what you as a person likes when the cue tip hits the ball and your holding it.

Dictonary:
To propel with a stroke or blow.

Thats not all, there are numerous examples of the word hit in the dictonary but it's rare, if any, the word is used for "feel".

Ahh, I'm going to go hit a few. LOL

Rod

Rod
08-10-2004, 10:45 AM
[ QUOTE ]
The HIT: aaaa It's what you as a person likes when the cue tip hits the ball and your holding it. Lmao <hr /></blockquote>

LOL yes it's the feel you like when the tip hits the c/b. ha ha ha

~~~rod, stud muffin eh? it does have a ring to it, doesn't it? /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Popcorn
08-10-2004, 10:53 AM
That sounds profound but it is not true. A good cue lets you do what you know how to do without handicapping you. I can't play 100% with a piece of junk cue. Same with golf, tennis, you name it, you need good equipment.

Chris Cass
08-10-2004, 10:56 AM
That was Kato! I remember that. He said, the cue don't make the shooter. The shooter makes the cue. Myself, I wouldn't know? /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Hi Ya George and welcome aboard,

C.C.