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wantsumrice
08-10-2004, 12:29 AM
Hey all!

Well, I am now officially king of the Harvard pool table this summer. And I'm king of the table at my school. So I'm thinking, why not make some money...I've come up with the idea of giving lessons for $2/half hour.

Now, my question was, for the true teachers out there, how do I go about doing this? I have the knowledge of a decent player (I think...), and I know what I'm doing...

What're your thoughts?
~Ivan

shooter72283
08-10-2004, 01:25 AM
I'd say it would depend on who you're giving lessons to. If it is solely for college kids who would only like to win a few beers at the local bar, then show them what you know, but since you're in the Harvard area (I assume) charge a little more. On the other hand, unless you are a certified instructor with a true mastery of the mechanics of the game, DO NOT try to teach anybody who is expecting that you will help them win tourneys and $$$. It is one thing to give advice to people who are less skilled than yourself, but it is entirely different to teach somebody the "correct and only" way to do something if you are not qualified to do so. The next question would have to be, how skilled are you? Are you sure that your game is good enough to pass on to others?

Chris Cass
08-10-2004, 07:13 AM
Hi ya Rice,

My suggestion would be to collect in advance. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif Seriously, take your shot at it but remember, your better off taking a lesson with a qualified BCA instructor first yourself. Then, you can begin to understand the depth of what your really doing.

Fun is fun but you like the teachers in your school will be paving the road for these less knowledgable players. It will be your responsibility to accept the fact you may hurt more than help. I believe you know what's right here and even though it's two bucks? I'm sure it's two bucks not worth the damage you could cause later for them.

For two bucks I think that if you teach them how to chalk, is good enough not to feel bad. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Regards,

C.C.

wantsumrice
08-10-2004, 08:19 AM
Hey,

I've thought about it, and you're right, I could cause more damage to their game. But I did teach this one girl to shoot, and she is well on her way. In less than an hour she was shooting at least 75% better than before.

I'm not going to teach any players who want to win $$$ or tourneys, cuz if they did, they wouldn't be coming to me! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif But then again, I know most of the kids that play at Harvard and I REALLY feel the urge to help their asses out.

[ QUOTE ]
For two bucks I think that if you teach them how to chalk, is good enough not to feel bad. <hr /></blockquote>

LOL If I could sell that kind of skill...I'd be well over a million dollars right now!

Wishing you the best,
~ivan

Sid_Vicious
08-10-2004, 08:43 AM
If it was me, I'd teach pro bono and watch all of my students' progress, 'course I'd maybe suggest they could buy me brewskys during our lessons. Nuthin' I can find wrong with that deal. If you are truly skilled at teaching, you'll find out, and get satisfaction at the same time..sid

Wally_in_Cincy
08-10-2004, 08:51 AM
Do you understand the mechanics of a good stroke?

bill190
08-10-2004, 10:58 AM
Playing well and teaching are two separate things.

I've noticed that some very good players are terrible at teaching. They tend to overload new players with too much stuff at one time. A new player will walk in the door and they will right away tell them to use English. Well they can't make a pocket with a dead center hit yet and attempting to use English at this point will only frustrate them. Best to work on one thing, then when that is mastered, go on to the next.

People are different and learn differently. Some people need you to tell them exactly how to do each and every thing (need a lot of structure), while others do better if you teach them what the theory is and let them figure out how to accomplish it on their own.

Then there is the "do-it-my-way-only" instructor. I think it is important to remember that pros play differently and with different equipment. There are many different "right ways" to play. Be flexible.

I have had the best success in teaching people to where they improve dramatically with the place the stickers on the table thing. i.e. Player is missing certain shots. Line up the shots, then place small stickers on the table where the cue ball and object ball go. They have them shoot the same shot 50 times. That's all. Don't tell them how to stroke or anything else. After 50 shots, they figure out how to do it. Simple, but quite effective with results! It helps if someone else is replacing the balls after each shot.

(After this and they are motivated to learn more, then may want to work on stroke and making the shot more consistently, etc.)

Chris Cass
08-10-2004, 11:03 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wantsumrice:</font><hr> Hey,

I've thought about it, and you're right, I could cause more damage to their game. But I did teach this one girl to shoot, and she is well on her way. In less than an hour she was shooting at least 75% better than before.

I'm not going to teach any players who want to win $$$ or tourneys, cuz if they did, they wouldn't be coming to me! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif But then again, I know most of the kids that play at Harvard and I REALLY feel the urge to help their asses out.

&lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
For two bucks I think that if you teach them how to chalk, is good enough not to feel bad. <hr /></blockquote>

LOL If I could sell that kind of skill...I'd be well over a million dollars right now!

Wishing you the best,
~ivan <hr /></blockquote>

Well Ivan,

If it's a girl, don't worry about it. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Regards,

C.C.~~running and ducking...HAHAHAHA

Bob_Jewett
08-10-2004, 11:20 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wantsumrice:</font><hr>I've come up with the idea of giving lessons for $2/half hour.

What're your thoughts?
~Ivan <hr /></blockquote>
There are several different parts to teaching. The first is knowing your subject. In the old days it was hard to get information about shots and much of it was wrong. These days there are lots of good books on the game. I'd say if you have read and understood even one of them, you have enough ammunition to start with, but please realize that some of what you have read is confused or mistaken and there are many other things about the game that no single book covers. Which books have you read? For those books, which have you taken to the table and tried the shots? Part of being a good teacher is being a student. As you learn more, you will discover that some of what you have taught in the past is false.

A second aspect of teaching pool is the ability to perform shots. On the web page below is a "Basics Clinic" handout with "progressive practice" drills. What is your score on the drills in set 2? (page 9, info on page 6) Beyond basic ability to shoot shots, can you demonstrate a good style? A bad style? Can you come straight through the ball?

A third aspect of teaching is knowing how to get your points across to the student, and seeing whether what you're saying is getting through. If you spend the majority of the time shooting shots yourself, it's unlikely that you'll be able to gauge your students' progress.

A fourth aspect is understanding what the student needs, which is not always what the student initially wants. I watched one instructor going into a complicated banking system for a student who didn't have a sufficient stroke -- it looked more like a spasm that happened to hit the cue ball. First things first.

I say, go for it. But $2.50 isn't enough if you're any good at it.

RichardCranium
08-10-2004, 06:47 PM
If you want to give lessons go for it........

Here is what I would suggest if you really want to teach....(formal or informal)

The very first thing you must do if you want to teach is to learn how to bond with your student. Don't jump right in and feed them info and jargon on pool. Get to know them. What do you want to get out of this lesson??? is a great way to start. Listen to what they say.. Learn to Identify the different types of students (kind of like personalities) and identify how to modify your teaching presentation to fit them. (ya know the A type B type C type D type stuff) THIS IS YOUR TIME TO ASK THE STUDENT QUESTIONS....How long have you been playing?? Have you had instruction before..(That is important..If they say yes, you want to find out what they have learned before, because they WILL compare that with what you are going to teach them and you will need to explian the difference and WHY you do it your way and not the other way)

Second BE PREPARED..have a adaptable teaching plan. During your bonding with the student, you are going to find out what level player they really are and you will be able to adapt your lesson to fit thier level and or speed of learning.

Always end a lesson with them wanting more...(kind of like a sitcom or soap opera) example if you just taught them one rail banks and you have given them some drills to work on end the lesson with. "when you come back in a couple weeks and show me you have one rail kicks and banks down, we will learn Two and Three rail kick. And show them a Three railer into the corner pocket, but don;t tell them how it is done....

Always leave them wanting more...I don't know if Rod know it or not but he has that kind of teaching skill. every time I see him he usually shows me something that lights a fire and makes me want to play more. Some people have that natural ability....

I would before you give a lesson that you find a local instructor in your area and ask if you can watch him or her give a lesson or 10....Don't watch what they teach, Watch HOW they teach. Watch how they interact with the student how they present thier information etc. Then build you OWN style of teaching......and have fun with it..

wantsumrice
08-10-2004, 10:04 PM
Thanks for the great replies guys!

[ QUOTE ]
A new player will walk in the door and they will right away tell them to use English. Well they can't make a pocket with a dead center hit yet and attempting to use English at this point will only frustrate them. Best to work on one thing, then when that is mastered, go on to the next. <hr /></blockquote>

Yeah, I've seen these kind of players all the time (mind you, they are kids). But, I know how to gauge a players skill and cater to their exact needs. Teaching is more psychological than anything else, bonding with the student then offering ways of making shots is key...but they have to decide how they want to do it.

Bob_Jewett:

I'll try the second aspect when I get home (where there's a table). Concerning the first aspect, I haven't read any books, but I have a good understanding of the game...else I wouldn't be offering lessons /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif. But I do understand where you are coming from in the third and fourth aspect. Both of which I strive to do in whatever I teach.

[ QUOTE ]
say, go for it. But $2.50 isn't enough if you're any good at it. <hr /></blockquote>

Yeah, but try telling the cheap ass kids at my school that. $2 lessons are probably still out of their range lol cheap bastards.

[ QUOTE ]
Always end a lesson with them wanting more...(kind of like a sitcom or soap opera) example if you just taught them one rail banks and you have given them some drills to work on end the lesson with. "when you come back in a couple weeks and show me you have one rail kicks and banks down, we will learn Two and Three rail kick. And show them a Three railer into the corner pocket, but don;t tell them how it is done.. <hr /></blockquote>

That's actually a REALLY good idea. I haven't thought of that before...Thanks! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif I will see if I can watch an instructor sometime.

Thanks y'all, always can count on you /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
~ivan

Rod
08-11-2004, 01:23 AM
Well, the price is right! You've received some good advice, go for it.

Rod

pooltchr
08-11-2004, 07:10 AM
If you really want to teach, why not go all the way? Get with one of the BCA academys, take the course and become a BCA recognized instructor. Not only will you learn a lot about the game, you will learn some things to improve your own game, and some very good teaching methods.

Yes, it costs some money to go to the school, but teaching the course to 3 or 4 students will make it back for you.

You will also have the knowledge that you are teaching the right things the right way. As someone else pointed out, you don't want to teach anyone something that isn't correct. I'm not saying this about you personally, but there are a lot of good players out there that really don't know what they are talking about when I hear them giving advise to beginners.

If you are going to do it, do it the right way.
JMHO
Steve

Wally_in_Cincy
08-11-2004, 07:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> If you really want to teach, why not go all the way? ... <hr /></blockquote>

Ummm.... Would it not be a good idea for our young friend to take a couple of lessons from a BCA instructor first before trying to become one? /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

pooltchr
08-11-2004, 08:07 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> If you really want to teach, why not go all the way? ... <hr /></blockquote>

Ummm.... Would it not be a good idea for our young friend to take a couple of lessons from a BCA instructor first before trying to become one? /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Depending on his skill level, it may be. I did both at the same time, but I had about 40 years of playing experience when it took the instructors course. Even so, I was amazed at how much I learned taking the course.
I also was lucky enough to have two Master instructors working with me at the time. Randyg and Doc are incredible!

Since you do have to be able to demonstrate the things you are teaching, it does require a certain skill level. I don't know why, but I got the impression he was a reasonably strong player already. Guess I shouldn't jump to those kinds of conclusions.

You may be correct.
Steve

Chris Cass
08-11-2004, 08:13 AM
Hi Wally,

First he needs to know the cost of the qualification and the lesson is included. That also with the constant filing of students confirming through-out the yr to hold onto that qualification too. There's so much that he might just get that lesson and forget qualifying.

They do list you on the website and it is a job. I think he's better off just taking a lesson or just give them explaining the lack of qualification.

I know many pool players that aren't qualified and give lessons. The problem with that is they're taking from these guys that are trying to do this for their living. They paid good money and deserve the business. Helping someone out is one thing and even I have given lessons before but myself, I feel after knowing what these guys do and the life they commit to doing it seems they should get a cut. A lesson atleast. That's just my feeling towards it and it's not professional nor responsible either. lol Had to through in the disclaimer. to cma....

Regards,

C.C.~~giving jump lessons to SPetty and Barbara for free. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif one came with the cue though. the other comes from the heart. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Chris Cass
08-11-2004, 09:37 AM
Hi Steve,

Would that be the poster Doc_Billiards? My buddy Doc? The one with the fish avatar?

Regards,

C.C.

pooltchr
08-11-2004, 10:10 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chris Cass:</font><hr> Hi Steve,

Would that be the poster Doc_Billiards? My buddy Doc? The one with the fish avatar?

Regards,

C.C. <hr /></blockquote>
That would be Leslie "Doc" Rogers. He goes by Doc because it would be too confusing around his house otherwise, since his wife's name also happens to be Leslie.
Doc is a Master instructor at Randyg's pool school.