PDA

View Full Version : APA Skill Level Formula



jjinfla
08-26-2004, 01:37 PM
A while back someone posted the formula for determining one's skill level in the APA.

Search as I may, I can't locate it.

Anyone know where I can find it?

Jake

RedHell
08-26-2004, 01:45 PM
Jake,

This might be the post you were looking for:

A post by Ross in answer to Fred (http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&Board=ccb&Number=118232&page =&view=&sb=&o=&vc=1)

breaknrun1
08-26-2004, 02:34 PM
It should also be noted that there is a performance factor involved in calculating your applied score. The performance factor is used when say, you are a 4 and beat a strong 6 3-0. Your applied score would have a factor applied to it, thus reducing your applied score and raising you handicap more than what it normally would. My LO told me this a few weeks ago when I was discussing handicap formulas with him. He said even he didnt know exactly what the factors were or exactly how they were implemented, but they are there.

Kelly

Rich R.
08-27-2004, 04:08 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote breaknrun1:</font><hr>My LO told me this a few weeks ago when I was discussing handicap formulas with him. He said even he didnt know exactly what the factors were or exactly how they were implemented, but they are there.<hr /></blockquote>
The APA is very secretive, when it comes to their handicap formula. I am guessing, they feel, the less people know, the harder it is to beat the system.

bluewolf
08-27-2004, 06:13 AM
Post deleted by bluewolf

Wally_in_Cincy
08-27-2004, 06:19 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluewolf:</font><hr>So, guess I will have to be patient and see if they decide they made a mistake and make me an sl3 again or if the people I beat was a factor and will be a 4.

Geez.

Laura <hr /></blockquote>

Would it not be more productive to call your LO and ask him rather than posting this on 2 different internet message boards?

Wally &lt;~~ just trying to help /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

bluewolf
08-27-2004, 06:25 AM
Well since it bothers you so much wally, I will delete my other post but FYI, I wrote the LO and he has not responded.

Laura

Chris Cass
08-27-2004, 06:52 AM
Hi Wally,

I've been noticing that many posts have been posted on the AZ site then posted here also. It's like they want to do a poll. LOL I think what ever the formular is. It must not be working. lol From the casinos to the pool leagues. I've never seen a system that really works. I'm wondering what system Tony Agganoni(sp) is coming up with?

Regards,

C.C.

Wally_in_Cincy
08-27-2004, 06:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluewolf:</font><hr> Well since it bothers you so much wally, I will delete my other post but FYI, I wrote the LO and he has not responded.

Laura <hr /></blockquote>

To answer your question I can think of no reason why your handicap should change just because you switched leagues. Maybe after a few matches, but not before you have played at least once.

Eric.
08-27-2004, 09:55 AM
Hey, I thought Bluewolf vowed to stop obsessing over her APA handicap?


Eric &gt;S/L Anonymous-"One day at a time"

rah
08-27-2004, 10:23 AM
Fred Agnir posted a link to an article that came real close to the grading system. This was written by an ex-APA person. Fred took it off because the APA or someone asked him not to publish this.

jjinfla
08-27-2004, 12:10 PM
Thanks Red Hell. That looks like the one. At least it has the same info. I think it is a shame that the APA doesn't publicize it and actually list skill levels to two decimal places - like 3.45 instead of 5. At least that way people wouldn't complain so much about skill levels. And it would probably aid in deciding how to match up the players. How often do you hear someone say "he shouldn't be a 4, he plays like a 5" Well if that person's actual score is a 4.01 then he actually is very close to being a 5. Whereas another 4 with a score of 4.99 is closer to being a 3. But they are both listed as 4's.

And when a person plays to win, and is playing to help the team, his skill level will improve.

But I really don't see why matches during a tournament, singles board, money cup, Vegas playoff, count for 1.5. A real catch 22. You have to play to win and if you do well you get moved up really fast.

But I do see where the system falls down and really helps the sandbagger. It is when a person really does not care about winning the trip to Vegas, never plays in the single boards, keeps his handicap at a 4 when he is really a 6, wins enough games during the session to have a winning average good enough for him to qualify in the best of the best and enters that and easily wins the cue. Can you imagine real 4's and 5's competing against someone who should be a 6 and they are spotting him balls? Robbery!

I did suggest to our LO that once a person wins a cue in the best of the best at a skill level he should no longer be allowed to participate in the best of the best at that level.

Our Captain sold us out that way. Even refused to play in a semi-final match for the trip to Vegas and played our worst player in his place. But he maintained his SL-4 and went to the best of the best and won another DP cue. See, he owns the bar and it would cost him too much to get someone to run it while he was in Vegas. Plus he would have to take a week off from his other full time job. So the trip to Vegas doesn't interest him. All he wants is APA players to come to his bar and spend money.

Jake

BLACKHEART
08-27-2004, 12:47 PM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gifI think you're startin' to get the picture. Most sandbaggers don't play in the APA singles tournaments, because if they win, they run the risk of having their handicap bumped up...JER
P.S. If you put up a dollar, for a prize...some people will figure a way around the rules, to win.

breaknrun1
08-27-2004, 12:52 PM
Actually Wally, I know a guy that plays in the Cincy area (Lynn's region) as a 3 and has played on my team in a neighboring region as a 5 for months. Lynn just never checked it out!

Kelly

bluewolf
08-28-2004, 07:24 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote jjinfla:</font><hr>
It is when a person really does not care about winning the trip to Vegas, never plays in the single boards, keeps his handicap at a 4 when he is really a 6, wins enough games during the session to have a winning average good enough for him to qualify in the best of the best and enters that and easily wins the cue. Can you imagine real 4's and 5's competing against someone who should be a 6 and they are spotting him balls? Robbery

[ QUOTE ]


This used to bother me. I finally realized that when i was playing a sandbagger, I had to work much harder to win.

This last session I played, I had a player who was ranked as a sl3 but was playing like a mediocre sl5. Now, everyone has a good night, but the w/l of the guy told the tale. He also was padding his innings which ended up in our match to be his undoing.

He was really good, much better than I, and there was no spot. I had to play extremely hard and as hard as I tried it was luck(on my part) and sandbagging that beat him. His padding of innings is really what beat him, because it enabled me more chances to pot balls than I would have had if he were playing his real speed, which was to go out in much fewer innings.

So, this can sometimes backfire on a person.

Laura

Scott Lee
08-29-2004, 09:46 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote breaknrun1:</font><hr> It should also be noted that there is a performance factor involved in calculating your applied score. The performance factor is used when say, you are a 4 and beat a strong 6 3-0. Your applied score would have a factor applied to it, thus reducing your applied score and raising you handicap more than what it normally would. My LO told me this a few weeks ago when I was discussing handicap formulas with him. He said even he didnt know exactly what the factors were or exactly how they were implemented, but they are there.

Kelly <hr /></blockquote>

Kelly...that is only possible in the event that the lower SL player beat the higher ranked player 3-0 in very few innings (3 or less). Otherwise, if there were the normal number of innings for a 3, there would be no "performance factor" change.

Scott Lee ~ former APA league operator
www.poolknowledge.com (http://www.poolknowledge.com)

bluewolf
08-29-2004, 10:43 PM
Thanks scott. Players will often tell things that happened from their perception, wondering why their sl is what it is, why they went up or did not, but not knowing the entire system, IMO, often not telling all aspects.

it appears that from what I have read, that it may take awhile to go up, but it is harder to go down.

Laura