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bluewolf
08-28-2004, 06:28 AM
I guess the leagues are good for encouraging beginners or for those who do not want to compete in tournaments but just want to have a night out with friends or for what ever reason, cannot put the time in to perform well at the tournament level.

But this is what I have observed. If a person stays at the same skill level, it is all to easy to become complacent. In league, people often focus on those numbers and unless you have a high sl, you get such a spot against really good players, you do not even have to work very hard. Getting lucky a few times will sometimes even result in a victory.

As an sl2, I was very motivated to become an sl3,then I became one. Once I became an sl3, though, things were just too easy. Sure I had a few challenges, physically along the way, but if I am going to be honest here, than I must say that I became very complacent. To compete at that level, and win at least 50% of my games, was just too easy and I stopped practicing. Where before I was very motivated to improve, I was resting on my laurels.

I have only played apa, and I really do not care for the round robin format here in BCA, but other than that only know about APA. The point I was making was that, even if the new franchise made me a 4 by mistake, I would have to practice more, work harder and that kind of thing.

I hope one day to be in some tournaments, even if I lose more, but physically, I am building my stamina so am not there yet.

It is not just me, either. I have seen lots of people who stay at an sl whatever for a long time become very complacent and all too 'comfy', just as I did.

Popcorn was trying to tell me a long time ago that league play was bad for my pool, and of course he was right.

So, I really do not think going up a skill level is about ego, it is about forcing a player out of complacently, whether they like it or not. I have met threes who I asked how long they played and was so shocked when they said 5 years, yet appeared to have some ability. Then I hear that they were a 2 for 3 years and a 3 for 2, that puzzled me. At first I thought that they had been sandbagging, but now wonder if it is more about complacency than anything.

I might have irritated some with previous posts, so what I am saying here is how lazy I had become.

Laura

Wally_in_Cincy
08-28-2004, 08:30 AM
Laziness might be part of the reason for folks being stagnant in their s/l, but more likely it is just the fact that they don't have a real passion for the game and league night is the only night they play.

Then there are a few sandbaggers of course. Theree's a guy in our league who plays 4 nights a week and he is a 4 after playing for 8 years. Curiously enough his team went to Vegas this year. Imagine that.

jjinfla
08-28-2004, 01:55 PM
Wally, the easiest way to stop a sandbagger is to mark defensive shots. Unfortunately, most score keepers around here don't even bother to mark them, if they can even recognize them, unless it is a very obvious one. And most score keepers do not even know that when there is no real attempt to make a ball that should be scored as a defensive shot. I personally let them go on the weak players, or when a person is really hooked and is just trying to hit the ball. But if I think someone is a sandbagger then I make sure I mark all of his defensive shots. Even when he is hooked and kicks at the ball just hard enough to send it to the rail.

But in the last year I only really noticed one person who actually knew how to control his SL, and I was on his team.
How did I know he missed shots on purpose? Because he told me he "needed a few more innings". Always wanted 18.

To be a good sandbagger takes some talent at pool and a good bit of acting ability. And you have to admit that there are not very many standout players in the APA who are 4's. The really good players jump up to 7 or 9 very quickly and end up leaving the APA. Or get on a team and play the minimum amount of games so that they can compete in the nationals. Which is fine.

And even the 7's and 9's are not really all that good around here. I mean compared to the better amateurs.

Jake

Jimmy B
08-28-2004, 02:35 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluewolf:</font><hr>

Once I became an sl3, though, things were just too easy. Sure I had a few challenges, physically along the way, but if I am going to be honest here, than I must say that I became very complacent. To compete at that level, and win at least 50% of my games, was just too easy and I stopped practicing. Where before I was very motivated to improve, I was resting on my laurels.

Laura <hr /></blockquote>

First thing you need to do is lose all the excuses, this whole post is a giant excuse, Popcorn is wrong league play isn't bad, it's all about the individual. Do not let the league or the SL define you, you seem to be so caught up in this number, you want it to define you. What you need to do is just play pool and be the best player you can be, I don't care what number you are or how you play. If you aren't motivated it has nothing to do with league it has to do with you, being lazy has to do with you and your practice habits and work ethic, nothing to do with a number or a SL. The APA does has a ceiling but you probably won't reach it, by that I mean to play and become a SK 7 and then to compete in Vegas in the singles event and win it or finish very high and find it so boring because of a lack of competitive play. There are many top bar table players in the APA, many who also play in BCA and VNEA and all the other bar leagues, many of these guys play at a near pro level. the fact is you are hiding behind this excuse and you need to forget about numbers and rankings and just motivate yourself to get better, don't let a number be your guide, you'll know when you improve. You can quit APA or play in other events but my guess is you'll just find a new reason as to why you stopped improving and got complacent. You need to own your game and take responsibility for your own actions; it's not the APA's fault.

JB

bluewolf
08-28-2004, 03:00 PM
Thanks for your post. Lots of good stuff.

Laura

Rich R.
08-29-2004, 06:10 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Jimmy B:</font><hr> First thing you need to do is lose all the excuses, this whole post is a giant excuse, Popcorn is wrong league play isn't bad, it's all about the individual. Do not let the league or the SL define you, you seem to be so caught up in this number, you want it to define you. What you need to do is just play pool and be the best player you can be, I don't care what number you are or how you play. If you aren't motivated it has nothing to do with league it has to do with you, being lazy has to do with you and your practice habits and work ethic, nothing to do with a number or a SL. The APA does has a ceiling but you probably won't reach it, by that I mean to play and become a SK 7 and then to compete in Vegas in the singles event and win it or finish very high and find it so boring because of a lack of competitive play. There are many top bar table players in the APA, many who also play in BCA and VNEA and all the other bar leagues, many of these guys play at a near pro level. the fact is you are hiding behind this excuse and you need to forget about numbers and rankings and just motivate yourself to get better, don't let a number be your guide, you'll know when you improve. You can quit APA or play in other events but my guess is you'll just find a new reason as to why you stopped improving and got complacent. You need to own your game and take responsibility for your own actions; it's not the APA's fault. <hr /></blockquote>
Tap, Tap, Tap.

This is some very good advice.

Perk
08-30-2004, 06:28 AM
Too many people in handicapped sports: bowling/golf/pool will sandbag. That is reality. I could care less. When I play any of the three mentioned, I come out firing. I dont care about the handicaps only because I care about getting better. If you are about the money then you are playing for the wrong reason in a league. Find your own reason to play and go from there. Dont worry about others. If you can play as a sl4, then do so. Dont get 'complacent' as you put it. Work to become a 5 and so on.

Another thing: Leagues are social by design. If the APA has a system that is designed to bring in other teams by breaking apart your team due to sl changes, then just adapt and overcome, or dont play. You can get better playing leagues if you choose to.

IMO