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View Full Version : Pool Table installed in a garage???



recoveryjones
08-30-2004, 03:11 AM
I spend at least $200 per month practising pool
( diligently doing drills....LOL) and so does my (pool junkie) friend. We were thinking of renting a place and going halfs on purchasing a 9 x 4 1/2 table.Finding a place big enough that will fit a table might not be easy and we may have to consider a double garage.

We have a personal friend who deals in used (and new) tables and we can get something of reasonable to excellent quality for $2000-$4000 Canadian and have it professionally set up by our friend, complete with new rails and cloth if necessary, depending on the selected table.

My question is this. Is a double garage(as a secondary option to a sizeable basement) an OK place for a pool table? What are some problems to look out for?
We live in climate friendly Vancouver Canada on the West Coast where the winters(little to no snow most winters) don't get too cold, however, we have a rainy season and therefore some humidity.What would it take to make a garage( other than a heater or two for three months in the winter) compatible?

With the $400 a month(probably more...LOL) we spend collectivley on practice,it is my thinking the pool table will pay for itself in no time.....LOL.... RJ

ps. I'm asking here first and yes of course I will consult my (table selling) friend for his opinion on the matter.Just wanted other feedback.

Rich R.
08-30-2004, 03:53 AM
Although I have heard of many people using a garage, there is a problem I foresee, and I don't know how people have worked around it.

Most garages, especially residential garages, are built with a sloping floor, so any spilled liquids will flow toward the garage door. It is a substantial slope and it may be tricky to level a table on such a slope. Also, the height of the table rail would change, in relation to the player, depending on which side of the table the player is standing.

These may not be major problems, I have never tried it.
Of course, if you are going to permanently convert the garage into a pool room, you could always level the floor.

rah
08-30-2004, 09:10 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> Although I have heard of many people using a garage, there is a problem I foresee, and I don't know how people have worked around it.

Most garages, especially residential garages, are built with a sloping floor, so any spilled liquids will flow toward the garage door. It is a substantial slope and it may be tricky to level a table on such a slope. Also, the height of the table rail would change, in relation to the player, depending on which side of the table the player is standing.

These may not be major problems, I have never tried it.
Of course, if you are going to permanently convert the garage into a pool room, you could always level the floor.
<hr /></blockquote>

I would suggest cutting foot square pieces of treated wood 2" thick to put under each leg. Then the wood could be trimmed/shaved and leveled before you install the pool table. Besides, this raises the slate 2" and is better for your back LOL. Old tables were very much higher off the ground. Today they are very low to the ground (to save on lumber cost?)

Have fun.

woody_968
08-30-2004, 11:01 AM
I have a table in my garage and love having it there. The best thing I ever did for my game /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif I need to install a window air conditioner as it gets a little warm in the summer, winter wasnt a problem.

As far as the floor we leveled the frame with wood under the legs before putting the slate on, this took care of the slope in the floor. And yes floor to rail is a little longer on the break end than on the foot end, but I havent had it bother me in the least.

One note, while you will save a lot of table time by doing drills at home, dont think it will totally take away your pool table time budget /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif You will still find yourself at the poolhall trying to show off your new skills from all that practice /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

bill190
08-30-2004, 11:06 AM
I bought a pool table and placed it in my garage. The "decor" is old tires, tools, oil cans, unfinished walls, exposed rafters, concrete floor, etc.

The table has Simonis 860, Aramith Pro balls, an Aramith "measles" ball, and a Sardo rack. And a cheap "shop" flourescent light above the table.

I also installed an air conditioner and will install electric heating before winter sets in. And I have a HEPA air cleaner to remove smoke from the air, but am going to get another today because it is still a little too smokey.

So it is an interesting contrast between the best and the worst. But everyone loves it and feels right at home!

Anyway my friends and I have saved a ton on money since we started playing at my house every day.

bsmutz
08-30-2004, 04:19 PM
I live in Vancouver, WA. Same sort of climate. I had a table installed in my garage last March, so I don't yet have a feel for the long term effects of the temperature swings. One thing I did that I really like is put some thick carpet pad and commercial 15' wide carpet down. It's a lot cushier than just the cement floor and helps cut down on the cold, too. Plus it only cost about $300-$400 at Lowe's for the carpet and the pad. For a 9' table it's plenty wide (never come close to the edge). Air conditioning would definitely be nice. In the winter I just used a small electric space heater and it only took about half an hour to get it warm enough to loosen up the muscles.

tn8ball
08-30-2004, 04:57 PM
I had mine in the garage for 3 years with very little problems. There will be a slope to the floor, but that's usually only enough for water shed, it's hardly noticeable on a 9 foot span. Shims will level your table fine on the concrete. Inoticed another poster than installed heavy carpet and pad to help with heat and insulation. Carpet works great for that, but a thick pad will allow your table to settle more and you may encounter more problems keeping it level. I have one friend with a Brunswick on thick berber and he keeps having problems with people leaning against the table on shots, that table will actually SCOOT! So much for level.

Consider this: Look for a house with an unfinished basement. That's why I bought mine - the basement was unfinished and therefore could not be claimed in the square footage of the home. I installed an I-beam and took out a support post, not I have a finished room that's 24X24 with no beams in the way of the table and my equity has gone up because I've technically added almost 600 sq ft to the house.