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RichardCranium
09-22-2004, 08:31 AM
Ok lets see what kind of feedback I can get on this.....

Everyone knows...or should know that your final focus should be on the object ball (or some say cue-ball..but that is a different subject) For this topic we will just assume its the object ball.

Keeping focus on the object ball seems pretty simple...look at your contact point and hold your head still......If you let your head move you lose your focus...

Now, there was some discussion that really caught my ear...The discussion was that losing focus on the object ball is what causes you head to move. This makes a lot of sense to me. If you can hold your focus your head is still, when your focus is weak, that is when your head starts bobbing around. Added to this was that when you lose that focus a split second before your stroke, your brain freaks out so to speak and thats when you jump up, get the yips miscue, etc.

Now, you have no idea how much this fits me.....there are days when I can shoot lights out and other days I can't make three balls in a row.

I am sure it boils down to focus. Have you ever thought your were focused on the object ball and then right after you miss you thought what the hell was I just looking at...Somethimes its not even a miss of the object ball, the ball goes in, but YOU know you missed.

I am sure some will say things about the "Zone" and I belive that really being in the "Zone" is just being in "UNDIVIDED FOCUS" on every shot.

I don't know if this makes sense but there are times when I feel like I am staring at my contact point but after the shot I know I was not focused on the ball.

After all this rambling...who has drills or whatever that will improve (UNDIVIDED FOCUS)

I think I might go eat some SUSHI and see if that helps /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
RC

rah
09-22-2004, 09:02 AM
Forget the zone crap. The zone will help you undoubtedly, but who can control it well enough in an 8 hour tournament. You will be exhausted going in and out of the zone.

It is better to work on your fundamentals in practice, like Allison Fisher says she does. That is the MAIN thing she works on.

Focusing on the object ball has to be ingrained so throughly that it becomes like a preshot routine almost. Make sure you head is in a comfortable position. If this means standing up a little, then do it. Then make sure you eyes are comfortably looking back and forth. If they are straining, then you will not be able to focus 100% of the time. Shoot with your eyes closed to ascertain that your body is comfortable (lined up) and that your stroke flows without jerking your head. All of these things are interelated and so in practice you must make sure that all of these are in place.

Finally, after you have got all of the fundamentals down, you must find a rhythm, ESPECIALLY in your eye movements. Do everything the same starting with the preshot routine down to freezing after the final stroke.

Competition should be used also as a test, and this in itself should help your concentration and focus. But you must have practiced all of the above so that you can do them in your sleep and especially under pressure.

Cheers.

RichardCranium
09-22-2004, 09:34 AM
To me the "Zone" is only the perception that someone has of some other player...."Man he is in the Zone" kind of thing. The actual player is just playing well at that particular time....I agree, forget the "Zone" crap....

However, that player must have "FOCUS" to be "percieved" by someone as in the zone....That is what I am looking for that UNDIVIDED FOCUS.....and if we are talking about running 100, 150, 200 balls in straight pool, it needs to be for an extended time. There obvously are guys and gals that can do it, but how do they maintain that focus.
Its kind of like the paddle ball rubber band thing. or bouncing a golf ball on a wedge. You can do it for a while, but as soon as you loose focus. you miss.

I like the idea of pre shot routine..and I have a definate pre shot routine...(I know all about the importance of pre-shot routine as I am a golf pro by trade) I have been told I have a very solid and sound stroke, so I do not think it is that. Even people that watch me say they can't understand why I miss....I will make ball after ball with perfect shape, and then all of a sudden out of no where I will dog a ball that I should never miss, or I make the ball but I get out of line. (it can be frustrating)

However.... I have never thought about eye movement like you say as part of a pre shot routine. I may have developed one naturally, but I may need to experiment with that concept.

Thanks for your imput...that is the kind of information I am looking for, I know I am missing something simple like that, and once I figure it out....well...will see.....RC

woody_968
09-22-2004, 10:34 AM
IMO focus and concentration are very difficult to define and or work on. Just looking at the OB does not mean you are focused on it. But then again, if you are thinking about focusing on the OB your focus is not on the OB either /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

I think the zone, or what ever you want to call it, is when we finally get out of our own way and let our mind and body free to do what we have trained to do. No more no less.

The problems you describe are very much like mine, and maybe it is focus. But if I were a betting man (which being a pool player I am /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif ) I would bet it is something in my set up or my stroke, and probably the stoke. It can be something small that only the very best instructors may be able to pick up, but I bet its there.

As pooltchr says - there are only two reasons we miss a shot - bad aim or improper stoke (or how ever he says it) I have been playing too long and made too many balls to think that I dont know how to aim some of the silly shots that I miss.

So the bulk of my time lately is working on stoke. But then one can get into the problem during play of thinking about the stroke instead of just seeing the shot and playing the game. It can be a terrible cycle to try to get away from /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif

ChrisW
09-22-2004, 11:35 AM
Dick,
I do the same thing you are talking about. My eyes will wonder around the contact point with out me realizing it. Since you said you have a solid pre-shot routine then I think you should be able to include eye movement and focusing on the contact point into that instead of letting it happen naturally.
I have found out that the pause on my final stroke really allows me to check and see if I am focusing on the contact point. I now you already figured this out but thought I would add my 2cents.
Chris

RedHell
09-22-2004, 02:24 PM
[ QUOTE ]
After all this rambling...who has drills or whatever that will improve (UNDIVIDED FOCUS)
<hr /></blockquote>

Richard, I too have focus problems. I feel I can make all the shots, but for some reason, I don't... More then often, after a miss, I realise I was looking at something else than the OB, I was thinking about something else than the shot at hand. In otherwords I lost focus.

One drill that has help me improve focus is this one. I'm not sure but I think it has been posted here by Scott Lee.

Take nine balls and lined them up on the foot rail second diamond. Take BIH and shot the first ball in the head rail corner pocket at your natural speed with a stop shot. Take BIH again and do the same for the second ball and so on until you potted all 9 balls. It seems easy and truly if you stay focused, it is. But by doing this often, I believe you trained your brained to stay focused for 9 shots at the time, wich should be sufficient to run a 9-ball rack. If you play 14.1, you might want to perform this drill with the 15 balls.

Since I do this drill, I realised that my focus has improved. Oh, also, when I lose focus and miss a ball at this drill, I make sure I take a lot of time resetting the balls. I go to my seat, wipe my cue, take a sip of my drink maybe sometimes sit for a few minutes and look around just to emulate a game situation where at this point my opponent should be shooting. This allow me to practice getting out of focus and getting back in...

I hope this help !

Cueless Joey
09-22-2004, 02:53 PM
Set, pause, finish?
Set up. Practice strokes. Stop, stare at the tip to the cue ball then to the ob for at least two seconds(without moving your head and anything but the eyebrows and eyeballs).
Shoot.
This one's free. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Barbara
09-22-2004, 06:40 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote RedHell:</font><hr>Richard, I too have focus problems. I feel I can make all the shots, but for some reason, I don't...

One drill that has help me improve focus is this one. I'm not sure but I think it has been posted here by Scott Lee.

Take nine balls and lined them up on the foot rail second diamond. Take BIH and shoot the first ball in the head rail corner pocket at your natural speed with a stop shot. Take BIH again and do the same for the second ball and so on until you potted all 9 balls. It seems easy and truly if you stay focused, it is. But by doing this often, I believe you trained your brained to stay focused for 9 shots at the time, wich should be sufficient to run a 9-ball rack. If you play 14.1, you might want to perform this drill with the 15 balls.

Since I do this drill, I realised that my focus has improved. Oh, also, when I lose focus and miss a ball at this drill, I make sure I take a lot of time resetting the balls. I go to my seat, wipe my cue, take a sip of my drink maybe sometimes sit for a few minutes and look around just to emulate a game situation where at this point my opponent should be shooting. This allow me to practice getting out of focus and getting back in...

I hope this help ! <hr /></blockquote>

Yes!! There is hope for you!! LOL!! You and CarolNYC should never be allowed in the same room. I think it would seriously mess with the Earth's magnetic force and polar gravitational fields!

Now if you could only learn how to slow down when people are following you... /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif

Barbara~~~no hope for me....

ras314
09-22-2004, 07:23 PM
I think Scott calls the 9 ball drill a "concentration drill", means one has to focus on each shot. Claims the shot itself is nothing (I ain't too sure about that!) that the idea is to maintain your concentration over a series of simple shots.

Usually I miss the first ball, cuss some, set the ball back up and pay more attention. 4 or 5 balls later it seems pretty easy so I miss again. Ugly!

Scott recomends you run this drill three times in a row. Well, IF you do you can be sure you have been able to focus!

stickman
09-23-2004, 03:08 AM
Sometimes when I'm practicing, it helps me to line up my shots and shoot with my eyes closed. This requires you to focus mentally.

#### leonard
09-23-2004, 06:54 AM
Richard, Jim Colbert wrote a two part article on fine tuning your concentration. They appeared in 6/75 and 7/75 if you can access their archives it is well worth reading.

The main thing I got out of the articles was mentally rehearsing every shot before shooting. The first time I played after applying his methods to pool I ran 212 balls with a road crew outside the poolroom digging up waterpipes.

The Symphony of the Jackhammers was my name for that run.

It so impressed the owner of the three table room that he had a placque made and hung it over his desk.

This was another trick I used, was to create a dance movement on every shot. I had obsevered that when great players started playing bad their body would lose its natural rythymn and their play would suffer. Keep everything in a natural dance sequence and your play improves dramatically. ####

Scott Lee
09-23-2004, 08:18 AM
Stickman...Absolutely correct! When you close your eyes, you are allowing your other senses (tactile and auditory) to take over. Assuming one has worked on their fundamental mechanics so that their arm moves in a straight line, you can easily pocket balls with you eyes closed. As far as the stop shot drill goes...yes, it is performed 9 shots at a time, and the ultimate goal is 3 sets (or 27 twelve inch, b-i-h, straight-in, lag speed stop shots). If you can perform the same shot the same way 27 times in a row, you will FEEL like you're 'in the zone'!

Scott Lee
www.poolknowledge.com (http://www.poolknowledge.com)

RichardCranium
09-23-2004, 02:30 PM
Thanks for the input

I combined the 9 balls drill with the eyes cloesed drill and fixed my "J" (from another thread)....this drill works really well.....

Funny thing...(Now I know my brain gets in the way) I was doing the 9-balls drill and could only make 6-8 before a miss....decided to try the drill with my eyes closed... missed the first three balls I tried and then made 11 in a row before I missed...did the full three sets with my eyes closed. (made 6 out of 9 avg) Then I did the same drill with my eyes open and made the first 23 and only missed one in the whole 27....

Now my question is why does this work????? Is there such a thing as to much focus???? When I was shooting with my eys closed I could not focus on the contact point I could only visualize what I lined up with....

Scott Lee
09-23-2004, 02:46 PM
Richard...First of all, understand that this exercise is a concentration drill. The 'anxiety quotient' is based on knowing in the back of your mind, that if you miss, you must respot the balls and begin again with the first shot.
That means that if you have pocketed 23 in a row (superior, btw), and miss, you have to start over with the FIRST shot.
That's why I tell my students to start out with just 9, then work their way to 18, and finally to the ultimate goal of 27. Our attention spans, even as adults, are quite short (about 15-20 minutes for the average person), and so practicing with discipline and structure for short periods will result in much greater gains, and quicker results, than trying to practice the same thing 100x in a row (usually resulting in anger, frustration or boredom...none of which are conducive to effective learning, imo).

Can you have too much focus? Of course...it's called paralysis by analysis. That's why we teach a system utilizing centergistics, and a pattern of only 8-10 seconds at the ball address. That allows you time to put it all together, but not enough time to start doubting yourself!

Scott Lee

ras314
09-23-2004, 02:55 PM
I've had the impression once you miss in this drill, you set up and start all over again. Hit 23 and miss, you start over again. I think this is to add to your desire to concentrate and do the 3 sets perfect. For sure it adds some challenge and pressure to what otherwise might be a boring drill.

Also it serves no useful purpose to keep trying once your results go downhill, give it a break and try again the next day.

Oops, Scott beat me to this one.

RichardCranium
09-23-2004, 03:23 PM
It looks like I did the drill wrong...I was setting up 9 balls alond the second diamond and shooting them up table in the corner pocket...1/2 on the left and 1/2 on the right (I have drop pockets) With my eyes closed I continued to shoot all 9 balls If I missed I did continue to shoot the rest of the balls even if I missed.....

When I repeated the drill with my eyes open I made all 9 on the first two sets and then made 5 on the third before I missed. I guess I should have started over at that point....
For whatever reason I thought you continued to shoot all 9...even if you miss...I wonder how I will do knowing that if I miss I have to start over....

ras314
09-23-2004, 04:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote RichardCranium:</font><hr> With my eyes closed I continued to shoot all 9 balls If I missed I did continue to shoot the rest of the balls even if I missed..... <hr /></blockquote>
Wow! I thought you could open your eyes between shots LOL. I used to pull the trick of turning my head to look at my opponent as I shot. Tended to encourage the mouthy ones to shut up.

I generally line 'em up and shoot 'em all at the same corner pocket. I tell myself if I had a ball return system so I wouldn't have to walk all that far I'd set 'em up and start over.

I have a Diamond Pro with the standard pro cut pockets. They sure ain't drop pockets but that is no excuse. Scott told me you could start seeing how fast you could make the 9 balls (15 sec, ect) once the drill seemed too easy. I haven't gotten there yet but shooting way slow doesn't seem to help.

stickman
09-24-2004, 02:55 AM
A couple things that you notice with the eyes closed drill is, your head never comes up on the shot, and you never second guess the shot. The way you wish you would shoot with your eyes wide open. HaHa /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif There is a lot of eye movement when you play with your eyes open. You check the aim, the cue position on the cueball, you estimate the distance to the intended cueball position to approximate the speed required, and recheck them again. This leaves you a lot of opportunity to second guess yourself. The second guessing is what I attribute a large number of misses to.

BCgirl
09-24-2004, 04:39 AM
Closing your eyes forces you to do things properly. You must know and be confident before you stroke that you are lined up correctly, and that you know how hard you need to hit the ball. So, it forces you to plan the shot, then to aim and check your aim. Finally, when you do stroke, you know that you cannot move anything. Most importantly, you _feel_ the contact, so it helps to develop a sense of touch. And, if you feel any elbow or other movement, you stand up and start again. So you become more sensitive to problems in the execution of the stroke. All these factors reinforce good planning and execution. On the minus side, you can't see exactly where the OB went in the pocket, so while it can be useful for developing confidence, execution and touch, it's not good for refining the correct aim for a particular shot.

As for turning your head away when executing the shot, this might _demonstrate_ that you're not looking, but it's difficult not to look around without any shoulder rotation or other body movement, so you're much more likely to miss. Which would, I guess, defeat the purpose of doing it in the first place.

BCgirl

Scott Lee
09-24-2004, 08:54 AM
Jim...Next time we get together, we'll have to work on your P.E.P. (Personal Eye Pattern movement).

Scott

ras314
09-24-2004, 11:22 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BCgirl:</font><hr>As for turning your head away when executing the shot, this might _demonstrate_ that you're not looking, but it's difficult not to look around without any shoulder rotation or other body movement, so you're much more likely to miss. Which would, I guess, defeat the purpose of doing it in the first place.

BCgirl <hr /></blockquote>
Actually I find turning the head more beneficial than closing your eyes. Teaches you to keep everything but your head still, sort of like keeping everything still except your arm during the stroke.

Guy I used to run with could turn his head, lift the cue off his bridge and wave it around, and while talking to somebody put the cue back on his bridge hand and make a neat thin cut shot. Was really something to see, till he got drunk he rarely missed.

stickman
09-24-2004, 11:29 AM
Scott, We'll count on it. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif My mental focus has not been what I wish it was. I'm sure a lot of it is stress related. I hit the balls very good with my eyes closed. There are too many things going on in my little brain to allow me to completely focus on the most important thing, the shot. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif I've been working on it lately and that is why I brought the idea up.

John_Madden
09-25-2004, 01:34 PM
Heh, Glendale and Bozeman
PRACTICE concentrating on focusing on the cue ball - its a matter of practicing until it is part of you - you will then automatically focus on that cue ball. Take care - PLAYER (from Glendale) and cuemaker (from AZ &amp; MT)

tateuts
09-25-2004, 10:41 PM
There sure are a lot of shots that are hard to make, that's why I'm looking for shots that are hard to miss. What I mean is I believe most shots are set up to be missed before the stroke.

A pre-shot routine and good fundamentals setting up for the shot are absolutely critical. If I get down on a shot in the right position, I actually think it's hard to miss it.

Trying to adjust aim from the wrong position just messes everything up.

Chris

Rod
09-26-2004, 02:30 AM
Richard, LOL

When you go to the dentist or doctor etc. and look up, there sometimes are celing tiles with all those little dots. Find one you like and stay focused on it for 10 seconds. Ha Ha Ha I still do that! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

On the serious side, but don't take the above to lightly there is some merit to hold focus for several seconds. There is a sports eye clinic in Scottsdale (I forget the name) for athletes. There was an article on the web that showed good athletes held their focus much longer. I believe it also mentioned pool. Some one may help me here if they remember the article.

What is strange baseball players, bowlers, golfers, have a fair amount of body/head movement although in most cases head movement is kept to a minium once the body is braced for impact. Pool players sure struggle with this aspect.

Although I think working with eye patterns has something to offer it's not the total answer. I think part of the answer is people looking where the o/b is going way to soon. You don't look down the fairway untill the ball is well gone. If you do peek, well you know what happens. Usually if they are unsure of the shot something goes wrong with the stroke. That's another aspect that needs attention. Be sure of what you want to do then execute. It's part of the preshot routine.

When your not completely sure is when things go wrong. A quick or cut off stroke can be a sure sign of losing focus. You still can get lucky at times and still make the shot though. I have yet to see the average to somewhat advanced pool player make to slow of a motion. It just doesn't happen, most seem to be in a hurry to get the shot off or like I said see where it's going.

Here is an anology for you. You watch a golfer take a good practice swing. Notice the rhythum of that swing. Now watch them when they actually swing at the ball. Most times it's totally different. Watch pool players when their playing well. Notice how it just flows with little effort. Watch the same player when they struggle, it's not even close. Even their warm up strokes can suffer. Lack of confidence no doubt and indecision.

Which brings me to the stroke. If you practice strokes with a more fluid movement it becomes ingrained. It builds your inner rhythum. That's not to say your stroke should be like anyone else but it should help if it resembled a pro like Buddy Hall.

There are no quick movements in pool. Even if it's a firm stroke or break, it's not started as a quick move. It is however learning gradual acceleration through the ball. I think most times this is the main problem. It causes you to loose focus as well as the other items mentioned.

As an aside are we loosing focus on contact point? If so that may be a problem as well. IMO there is no contact point. If there is how do you stay focused on a point, spot etc? There is an angle though and that's what I look at rather than a specific contact spot.
I think I could write a book on why things happen. I surely can't express myself well enough here without a lot of type.
Well enough jabber, maybe something I've said may be of some help.

Hows your golf game?

Rod

Stretch
09-26-2004, 05:28 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote tateuts:</font><hr> There sure are a lot of shots that are hard to make, that's why I'm looking for shots that are hard to miss. What I mean is I believe most shots are set up to be missed before the stroke.

A pre-shot routine and good fundamentals setting up for the shot are absolutely critical. If I get down on a shot in the right position, I actually think it's hard to miss it.

Trying to adjust aim from the wrong position just messes everything up.

Chris <hr /></blockquote>

Good points Chris. I see with this subject that everyone has kind of blurred the lines between focus/concentration/preshot routine etc. and they all are inter-related in order to produce the shot so that's not surprising. For this thread, lets just leave the physical alone and look at the mental(understanding however that it all gets put together in the end).

To me good concentration happens when you are so engrossed in a task that there are no outside influences. Your mind is fresh, your thinking clear, and your visualizations are vivid and sharp. This is the framework within which we perform. Some people require a motive for achieving this. For instance, put a wager on the game and watch your interest level take a huge leap forward lol. Same thing for Scott's nine-ball drill or other such tasks where there is an element of accountability. All good for making you "pay attention". And that's really the jist of what good concentration is right? Paying attention. If there is any doubts as to your commitment to paying attention, try playing a whole game where your whole world revolves arround the table. Even when your in the chair your relaxed but your eyes never wander from the board and your mind is prepairing for your next visit where you already know what needs to be done because you havn't missed a thing.

Everyone has there own "buttons" they press for getting into the game. It dosn't realy matter what it is, only that it helps thier concentration. Earl apparently needs a little "agro" to get him going. Others need the thrill of instant riches to find thier stroke. Still more (sadly) need a shot or a snort and they're good to go. Us puratins need only the thrill of compatition, and the satisfaction that comes from a job well done to satisfy our unquenchable ego right? lol

Now "focus" that's just what the word means. Look at it as a beam of light that starts by illuminating the whole table. Then as you decide on the proper shoot that beam narrows down to the area of the cb ob pocket and desired final resting point of the cb. Then the beam narrows still more to the cb ob pocket, then down to cb ob, and finally to an intense dot right on the contact point, then shoot. St

pooltchr
09-27-2004, 06:18 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rod:</font><hr> Richard, LOL

When you go to the dentist or doctor etc. and look up, there sometimes are celing tiles with all those little dots. Find one you like and stay focused on it for 10 seconds. Ha Ha Ha I still do that! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
Rod <hr /></blockquote>

Rod. This is not as strange as it might sound. You have to practice focusing.
I watched a thing during the olympics where the US women's softball team would use tennis balls with numbers on them. The players practiced trying to read the numbers as the balls were coming toward them from a mechanical launcher. By training this way, they had no problem focusing on a pitched ball flying toward the plate. The end results speak for themselves.
Steve

John_Madden
09-27-2004, 08:57 AM
Hi Rod,
Imagine talking to you here. Sounds like all is well with you and your game. Take care.
Jack Madden

Rod
09-27-2004, 07:57 PM
Hi Jack and welcome.

It's been a while. I won't profess to say my game is good but I'm ok. Hope all is going well with with your cue business. There are several cue makers that post here at times. Put a link to your business under your signature if you desire. They don't allow advertising but a link is fine.

I heard you were moving to Montana. Jeez how time flies that's been two or three years? Take care yourself.

Rod

John_Madden
09-28-2004, 09:05 AM
Thanks Rod,
Cue business has just started back - took quite awhile to get my shop and house built - house still isn't done. I just got a web site up and have started advertising in some of the local billiards papers - 2 in Phoenix next month. If you want to check out the website it is: www.johnmaddencues.com. (http://www.johnmaddencues.com.) You have probably seen some of the cues in Phx (one is in a collection so I don't think its seen a pool room, ones in Chicago, another Seattle, and another is here in Grizzly country). Love this country - if you want send me an email from my website with your home email. I can email you pictures of your next vacation spot!! And I just go out the shop door. Had a couple grizzlies last week to spice things up. But I will be back in Phx off and on - still have two of my kids and 6 grandkids (4 yrs and younger!!) living there. Take care and send you the pictures
Jack

RichardCranium
09-29-2004, 09:33 AM
Hey Rod

The Golf game is good....I did not play a whole lot this summer....I had planned on playing a few tournaments this summer, but I got a Strep infection in my blood and ended up in the hospital for about a week with Pneumonia and failing Kidneys....I just thought I was sick with the flu or something, but when I went to bed that night I could not get to sleep cause my right ribs hurt real bad...I could not breath very deep and I kept spikig a fever....Finally I told my wife to drive me to the hospital...The Doc said it was a good thing I did not go to sleep...He said I probably would not have woken up....They ran test on me and said my kidneys had all but shut down, my right lung was a mess and I had a strep infection in my blood...They ran every test in the book on me...The good news is the Brain Scan they did came back negative....(No screws loose so to speak)
Any way that took me over a month to fully recover the lungs and I was told NO Golf in 100+ degree weather...So that pretty much ended my summer...I am still on a kidney watch for about a year. The Doc says I should be fine, but I need to make sure I treat my kidneys real nice for the next year or so....Meds, sugar etc....Pretty much back to normal though now......

Ya know you mention golfers peeking...(which is a problem) but some are so intent on holding thier head still that they tense up thier whole upper body and can't make a good swing either....I think this may be some of my problem....Also If I miss, I lose confidence (too quick) and start "watching my stroke" and then I am done for.

What I mean by watching my stroke is I am thinking about making a good stroke instead of making the ball, and even though I am looking at the ball, I am not focused on making the shot... This happens to putters...If you watch a "good" putter, 99% will look at what I call "Ball Forward" They are only looking at the ball and down the line to the hole (they don't even think about the stroke itself) ...Poor putters end up looking "Ball Backward" They end up watching thier putter going back and through the ball and can't keep the putter on line on a consistent basis...I KNOW this translates to pool....putting by the way is the worst part of my game (surprise, surprise) I am not "Bad" at putting, I take 31 or 32 putts per round...That is above average as far as most golfers go, but Tour Pros take about 28 putts per round....There is always those 4 or Five puuts per round that I miss that A Tour Pro "Would" have made...

Same thing happens in pool...I miss about 4 or 5 "key" shots that cost me matches against better players. I can win against weaker players cause you get those shots right back...but when you play someone that can really play. you might not get another clean shot...

I've picked up some good advice from this thread (mostly what I expected) and I can sure I will see some progress....

Funny Thing about the 9-ball drill...Now that I am doing it correctly, I can get through the first 9-balls, but what I find is that I get lazy on the set up of the next shot and won't line the shot up straight in, but I shoot it any way, and that is when I miss. (I am sure that is part of the drill to learn patience)

So...Rod, where are you hanging out these days...I would love to get togehter with you sometime (so I can pick your brain) and mabey you can point out some of my many flaws..:)

Rod
09-29-2004, 11:23 AM
Wow sounds like you had a bad summer. Sorry to hear you had severe problems. The important part is you’re well again and you know what to monitor.

You mention head tension and we know it travels down the neck and into the shoulders, good point. It's important to keep still but not tense. Tension is a killer. Your analogy on the putting stroke falls right in line also.

If you find yourself getting lazy on the setup and aim, I have a warm up drill that will help with your alignment, aim and stroke. In the beginning if you watch your stroke it's ok. That's the point you can see it make little moves in one direction or the other. Most likely caused by a little bit of tension instead of just letting the weight swing. It's shot at slow speed in the beginning; you'll need a straight stroke good alignment and aim.

Here is the basic setup, appx one ball width from the rail or a tad over and not too much angle. BTW, you can't touch the side rail with the o/b. See if you can go both directions without doing such. Sorry no Wei link, I use mine on the desk top.
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Shoot half a rack to one corner, and then switch back to the direction you started. It's important you switch right to left then left to right. Doesn't have to be in that order though. You'll see a difference when you switch most likely. One side you shoot well and the other side thin or fat. It will show your tendency both directions.

Give it a try, start slow and increase speed later if you like. Be sure to let the cue flow through the ball, don't let those little muscles or the big ones for that matter take over. It will help and I guarantee that shot from any angle will be a lot more simple. LOL

I'm not hanging anywhere right now, been caught up with other matters. My game I'm sure sucks a bit. ha ha If you venture across town to play at clicks let me know maybe I'll have some time.

Rod