PDA

View Full Version : He's found his cue in life (Danny Basavich)



PQQLK9
09-29-2004, 07:48 AM
He's found his cue in life
Wednesday, September 29, 2004

BY STEVE POLITI
Star-Ledger Staff

The sharks would look at the fat kid and see dollar signs. He had chocolate cake smeared on his face and shirt. He smelled like someone poured a beer over his head. He was losing to the town drunk. And he wanted to play them for money?

They would take out their cell phones and call their buddies. "Easy mark," they would say laughingly, and everyone with a cue would show up at the pool hall, hoping to get in line for the free buffet.




A few hours later, Kid Delicious would leave town with all their money.

"There is a moment when they go, 'Man, you're not playing like you did when you first walked through the door,'" he said. "In the beginning, I got nervous when I had to start showing my game. I finally realized, nobody's going to do nothing -- and I was there to take their money."

His name is Danny Basavich, although everyone calls him by his nickname. Kid Delicious hustled for most of his young adult life, traveling to 48 states, to big cities and small towns. He said his winnings top six figures, and he did it despite an overwhelming depression that forced him to drop out of high school in Manalapan.

Now, days after his 26th birthday, Basavich has come off the road to pursue his lifelong goal: becoming the No. 1 pool player in the world.

New Jersey already has produced its share of famous pool players. Steve "the Miz" Mizerak of Middlesex County collected titles in the 1960s and appeared in the Paul Newman movie "The Color of Money." Loree Jon Jones started playing pool at 4 in her Garwood home and turned pro at 11. Newark-born Jack "Jersey Red" Breit was a contemporary of the great Minnesota Fats.

Basavich has the talent to join that list. He has won six events this year heading into the prestigious World Summit of Pool, which begins tomorrow at Grand Central Station in Manhattan. Sixty-four world-class players will play 9-ball, a game in which players must shoot at the lowest numbered ball on the table with the object of legally sinking the 9-ball. The purse is $50,000.

No amount of chocolate cake on his face will help him now.


Grim beginnings

Pool didn't always come this easy for Basavich, who is 5-9 and 290 pounds. He picked up the game when he was 12 at a Manalapan pool hall called Elite Billiards, letting a local legend named "Neptune" Joe Frady school him a couple of times a week. He told the owner he wanted to make a living playing billiard.

"You should quit for two weeks," the man responded. "And after that, you should quit altogether."

But if he quit, where would he go? He dropped out of high school the second week of his sophomore year, too depressed to deal with the cliques and the ridicule from other students. He finished his high school requirements at Old Bridge Adult High School, but that was just one hour a day, three times a week. He did the rest of the work at home.

His father took him to counselors and therapists, but nothing helped him to escape the feelings of dread and paranoia, the overwhelming sense of hopelessness.

"It really upset me, because every now and then you'd heard about a young kid who would commit suicide," Dave Basavich said. "I was afraid he would get too depressed. The pool was better than therapy. The pool kept this head straight until he grew up."

When he was 18, he and his buddy, "Bristol" Bob Begey, left town. They drove to Philadelphia, to Boulevard Billiards, a place where mobsters bet on 9-ball games and where a former U.S. champion named Mike Lebron ruled the tables.

Basavich wanted to play Lebron, but he had to prove himself against the other players first. He won his first match, then his second, then his third, pocketing thousands.

Finally, it was his turn against Lebron.

"The whole room was betting against me. All of South Philly was betting against me," he said. "I was down 5-0. I went into the bathroom and looked at myself in the mirror, and I was so depressed. I was going to lose all the money I had won.

"Then I came out and won 11 straight games."

Kid Delicious and Bristol Bob, their pockets stuffed with cash, hit the road.


On the road to success

It was always the same game plan: Basavich would pick out the smaller places first, trying to ease his way into town, and then work his way to the big games. He had the help of a "steer man," a guy with a thick binder listing the good players in each city and how to find them.

"In every state, there are always three or four good players," he said. "They'll be the best player in their local area. And everyone thinks they're the best, that they can't lose.

"And I'd go in there and take them on and beat them."

He had a few lines prepared. "I'm on my way to Vegas for vacation," he would said. Or sometimes it was "I'm in town visiting a friend." He was lying, he knew, but he said, "I couldn't tell them I was there to take their money."

He would start with a novice game for $5 or $10, and it would escalate quickly. "You'd be surprised," he said. "Once you get a $10 game, you'd be surprised."

Basavich would rub some beer on his face. He would act drunk, stumble around the table. "Sure enough, here come the good players, walking through the door," he said. "I'm telling you, it works like clockwork. People from all over town are coming to take money from the guy from out of town."

Every town has a shark, a guy who already has beaten everyone else in town. He can't get money games any more, so when an out-of-towner shows up, he jumps at the chance to play.

Basavich found these guys in places like Fargo, N.D., and Duluth, Minn., and Louisville, Ky. He found them in places with Sheetrock on the wall and bare floors, where the music from the jukebox would rattle the balls on the tables.

"These guys never get beat in their region of the country," he said, "because who's going to go there?"

He never talked big money until they talked big money. Then he might announce, "I'm getting tired of this. I'm going to Vegas on vacation and I've got all this money and I don't care if I lose." The $10 stakes become $1,000, and guess what? Basavich becomes a different player. The fat kid with the chocolate cake and the beer cologne suddenly looks like he invented the game.

Eventually, he ran out of states. He had played money pool everywhere but Hawaii and Alaska, and his picture might as well have been on a wanted poster in every pool hall or dive bar. Nobody would play him anymore.

He decided it was time to play professionally, his second attempt at a more stable -- if less profitable -- existence.


Taking the high road

The first time, three years ago, he hit the treadmill and lost 110 pounds. He was in the best shape of his life, the perfect time to become a pro. The tour was called the "Billiards Channel Challenge." The best players in the world would compete in a series of 16 events, and at the end of the year play for a quarter-million dollar purse.

Basavich won his first event in Coconut Creek, Fla., beating a legend, Buddy "the Rifleman" Hall, in the final game. He finished ninth in the next two events. When the standings were released, Basavich was the No. 1-ranked player.

"And then the tour got canceled," Basavich said.

He got depressed. He gained back the weight. He didn't leave his house for six weeks, and when he did, he went back to the lifestyle he had known the best. He went back on the road.

But this time, the tour is not going anywhere, even if Basavich certainly is. In August alone, he played in tournaments in Rockville, Md., Goldsboro, N.C., and Memphis, Tenn. He traveled to Taiwan for the world championships in July and finished 25th in the U.S. Open this month in Chesapeake, Va.

He is ranked 33rd in the world. He hired an agent and taped four instructional videos, his easygoing personality making him a natural on the camera. He also has his own cue line: For $349, you can own a Kid Delicious original.

And the depression? In check, with the help of medication.

"I was very lucky to find pool, because it helped. It's the place I feel most comfortable in," Basavich said. "The gambling is coming to the end, and now I'm going for No. 1 in the world."

http://www.nj.com/sports/ledger/index.ssf?/base/sports-4/1096434617118070.xml

Eric.
09-29-2004, 08:15 AM
Thanks Nick. I enjoyed the article. Local player that used to be 'unknown'. One mistake though, Danny has been to Alaska. There can be alot of action there.


Eric

br8knrun21
09-29-2004, 08:44 AM
Nice article PQQLK9.

"He also has his own cue line: For $349, you can own a Kid Delicious original."

^^^^^^Didn't know this.

Perk
09-29-2004, 10:57 AM
Excellent article.

Thanks.

Popcorn
09-29-2004, 03:02 PM
Stereotypical interview with a pool player. They always come off sounding like pathetic bums.

JimS
09-30-2004, 05:17 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> Stereotypical interview with a pool player. They always come off sounding like pathetic bums. <hr /></blockquote>

I don't think he comes off sounding like a pathetic bum. I think he comes off sounding like what he is; a guy who's had problems in life and now he's making his way. I find it an inspiring story that might give hope to someone who's hurting.

Wally_in_Cincy
09-30-2004, 06:19 AM
[ QUOTE ]
He had the help of a "steer man," a guy with a thick binder listing the good players in each city and how to find them.
<hr /></blockquote>

In a recent edition of Inside Pool they asked him about going on the road and he said he never played anybody unless he already knew their speed. Sadly for his opponents, they did not know his /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Wally_in_Cincy
09-30-2004, 06:20 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> Stereotypical interview with a pool player. They always come off sounding like pathetic bums. <hr /></blockquote>

You are such an optimist /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

I thought it was a rather interesting story for players and non-players alike.

Popcorn
09-30-2004, 07:33 AM
He is seriously obese and somewhat mentally ill trying to make a living in a sport where no one can make a living. From what I read he should be under a doctors care and not out playing pool. He sounds like he is one missed 9-ball away from putting a gun in his mouth. I was not inspired but saddened for him. I can just see a mother whose son likes to play pool reading this and not feeling so good about her son going to the pool room. Same with a city commissioner reading stories like this, with all the bragging about the gambling and so forth, who is about to vote on a variance for someone trying to open a pool room in their town. It serves no good purpose and players should not give these kinds of interviews. I guess they think it make them sound smart, running around, stealing from unsuspecting players, paying no taxes like they are beating the system or something. I will stick with my first impression, it make them sound like pathetic bums, and no one to me admired and I am sure anyone reading the story who is just an everyday person would see it about the same way. No matter how you look at it, it serves no good purpose for the sport. Players should no better, but none of them do.

Deeman2
09-30-2004, 07:54 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> He is seriously obese and somewhat mentally ill trying to make a living in a sport where no one can make a living. From what I read he should be under a doctors care and not out playing pool. He sounds like he is one missed 9-ball away from putting a gun in his mouth. I was not inspired but saddened for him. I can just see a mother whose son likes to play pool reading this and not feeling so good about her son going to the pool room. Same with a city commissioner reading stories like this, with all the bragging about the gambling and so forth, who is about to vote on a variance for someone trying to open a pool room in their town. It serves no good purpose and players should not give these kinds of interviews. I guess they think it make them sound smart, running around, stealing from unsuspecting players, paying no taxes like they are beating the system or something. I will stick with my first impression, it make them sound like pathetic bums, and no one to me admired and I am sure anyone reading the story who is just an everyday person would see it about the same way. No matter how you look at it, it serves no good purpose for the sport. Players should no better, but none of them do. <hr /></blockquote>

I might have agreed with you twenty years ago when Las Vegas and the Catholic Church had a monopoly on gambling but now we have a casino everywhere they can find to park a riverboat, most states have lotteries and gambling is not as looked down on as in the past. I just don't think most people, outside of pool give these stories much credence, they just don't care.

I wish Danny would lose the weight, heck, I wish I were not fat but let's not judge everyone who does try to make a living as a crackpot and tie their weight to their value as a person. Some people do make a living wage in pool even if it's not always the players.

If you don't get these type stories every once in a while, the game seems too tame to a lot of folks. I just don't think is frightens off tons of potential players. After all, when the game was really seedy, in the 30's and 40's, it was at it's highest point. All the squeeky clean stories have not given us a big boost either. If you take Danny's little story away, they will just fill it's slot with some other junk about lawn bowling or other crap.

I think we are taking this stuff way too serious since their is no pool related reality show, it can't be that important. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Steve Lipsky
09-30-2004, 09:33 AM
Popcorn, I agree with some of your points, and strongly disagree with others.

Danny is a good-natured guy who's battled some serious problems in his life. I've seen two lengthy stories on him in the last few months, and both of them have centered heavily on his weight and depression. He is being open and honest about very difficult topics. Is he doing it as personal therapy? I don't know. But his honesty is impressive to me.

As for what is good for the game, I'm long past caring. Nothing will change the fact that this is a blue-collar, boring game to watch. Do you think if Basavich had said, "Well, in the prep schools I was captain of the varsity billiards team. We would come back from classes, study, play a set of nine-ball, and then have a spot of tea with the dean." that anybody's image of the game would change? If you do, I don't know what to say.

Ewa Laurance has been promoting the game in positive ways for 15 years now. What difference have you seen? The women's tour is certainly in better shape than it once was, but it's not exactly thriving.

It's been said before, and the more I think about it the more I believe it, the only way to "capture" the general public's attention in this game is to promote the money issues. Be they gambling or tournament purses (preferable), people will watch for the money. The second they see first prize pays $6k or something, it's channel surfing time. I mean, that's a house payment to some people.

The other way to make it more appealing is to film the matches, not videotape them. Whichever genius at ESPN hasn't figured this out yet should be fired, effective immediately. For anyone who likes poker on TV, the WPT (in video) is almost unwatchable. The World Series broadcasts (in film) feels like you're watching an event.

I also don't really care if pool becomes more popular, to be perfectly honest. It's not going to change my life, except perhaps it will induce some more TV stations to air more boring pool matches.

Anyway, I don't see why it's up to Danny Basavich to be pool's ambassador of the game, and even if he wants that title, why his opinions on promotion have to fit with yours. A guy did an interview with him, and he told the truth. Would you rather him lie? I can tell you something about pool players and interviews... they're lying enough as it is. I just read an article where a player, who I sort of grew up with, claims to have won (and then squandered) $500,000. Unless he played a match for like $520,000 when I wasn't looking, I think his figures may be a bit off. But there it is, in print, for the world to believe.

- Steve

Popcorn
09-30-2004, 12:01 PM
The image means a lot. When you try to rent a building once you tell them what you want to do with it they will turn you down. Many cities have specific ordinances regarding pool rooms on the books, these same towns may have adult entertainment all over the place but no pool rooms. I once sold a pool room and the real estate agent I called was afraid to come look at the place. We are part of the pool community you and I, but we may be very surprised what the average non pool playing person thinks about pool. It is worse then you imagine. My accountant after I had bought a pool room asked if I was not afraid of all the violence, guns, drugs and stuff that the business may involve. I am not kidding, the image is far worse then you think. Articles like this just perpetuate it. It just does not help.

Dagwood
09-30-2004, 12:11 PM
Good post Steve. Knowing Danny myself, I thought the interview gave a quick but fairly accurate reflection of who Danny is; an honest person with problems that alot of people are dealing with who is just trying to make a living. I don't think that it portray's him as a bum in any way, but someone who is trying to make it in this country the way he knows how to.

I don't believe that he's giving these interviews to "change the public's perspective on the game", or become an ambassador to the game, or to boost his image. I think Steve possibly may have hit on a point in that it may be some sort of "self-therapy", or even better, that he's finally come to grips with who he is, and isn't ashamed to talk about it anymore. I feel somewhat insulted by some of your comments regarding Danny, Popcorn, as I consider him to be trustworthy, (as far as poolplayers are concerned), and honest. Just because someone spent a few years working the road doesn't mean that they are straight up theives, tho they are out there. If you've never had the opportunity to meet or talk to Danny, try to hold off on judging him until you do. He really is good people.

Ciao, Dags

Dagwood
09-30-2004, 12:20 PM
Popcorn, I agree with you that the image of the billiards industry in America is much worse than many of us realize. But, (and this may seem a little backward to some), in order to change that image, we have to emphasize the intersting aspects of the game we have come to love, (granted not endorse them), to bring more people into the fold in order for them to see that the pool scene isn't as bad as it's cracked up to be. It's not goign to happen overnight, and I very much doubt that we'll see it happen in the next few years. But that's the only way that I can see it happening.

And to adress the fact that the image of pool drives away investors...sure. I'll agree with that. If more people are brought into the billiards community due to the intrigue and allure of money, (more people = customers = more income), investors will be more likely to take a risk and invest in a Billiard room. It's just a matter of a trade off.

again...Ciao,

Dags

Wally_in_Cincy
09-30-2004, 01:05 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Dagwood:</font><hr> ...If you've never had the opportunity to meet or talk to Danny, try to hold off on judging him until you do. He really is good people.

Ciao, Dags <hr /></blockquote>

I've seen the guy in person 3 times and I have never seen him without a smile on his face.

I got an autograph from him at DCC. I told him he could not sign it unless he signed "Kid Delicious" because that's the best nickname ever. He laughed.

snipershot
09-30-2004, 01:30 PM
I've heard alot of good things about Danny, he seems to be well respected by the other players, so what if he has had a bit of a troubled past, we've all had our problems at one point or another.

Chris Cass
10-01-2004, 05:39 AM
Hi Steve,

I talked to Danny for awhile at the Open. He seemed like a good guy. He was sincere and was very attentive to anything I had to say. We talked about the ring game that didn't take place and a few other things. Myself didn't believe what I read in this interview thing.

I can't picture him rubbing beer on his face trying to get action and it all seems like hype to me. Too bad they always try to find the seady part of pool as exciting. To me Danny seemed very respectful like I said. I also find it hard to believe that he was having problems dealing with the weight issue. He doesn't seem like he would have a problem with it. I didn't think of it as such a big deal myself. I've seen bigger men do many things and have known players that have been big not have a problem playing great pool.

I'm sure like the alcoholic, can hide themseleves pretty good. I never judge others by their size but their play. There was a guy I met was the counterman at Maries Golden Cue in Chicago named Matt. Him and I made a few hundred a piece one night there and he had half my action.

He also had my back that turned out to be a good thing that time too. Matt could play btw. He just liked the game. I never thought about how big he was till this article and he was much bigger than Danny. Funny how that is so immaterial compared to ability.

JAT,

C.C.

RailbirdJAM
10-01-2004, 06:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>I got an autograph from him at DCC. I told him he could not sign it unless he signed "Kid Delicious" because that's the best nickname ever. He laughed.<hr /></blockquote>

The first time I met Danny Basavich, a young player from New Jersey, he was introduced to me as "Kid Delicious." We were at Drexeline Billiards in Pennsylvania attending a Joss Tour event about three years ago. Allen Hopkins was there as well as a lot of other high-caliber players. The very first thing I noticed about him was his eyes. He has those "Tommy Kennedy" kind of eyes that sparkle and smile.

Seeing him at various tournaments, we've shared many a good laugh and have become friends. His best asset in person is that he, in fact, is a good listener and gives whoever he is talking to his complete undivided attention.

It's hard to make a living in the current tournament-inclined pool world. The payouts are the same in the year 2004 as they were in 1984, and when attending larger tournaments, you're stuck $1,500 and $2,000 before you hit the first ball. I understand how players like Danny gained their strong pool-shooting capabilities from on-the-road travels and action games.

I met Danny's father at the Big Apple tournament last year, a self-made man who only wants the best for his son. He worried about Danny making his future in pool, but knew it was in his blood and supported him in all his endeavors.

A sponsor recognized a specialness in Danny, his charismatic personality as well as his strength in pool, and fortunately, it has provided some opportunities for him to excel in the sport. When he won the Joss Tour Finale in Portland, Maine, earlier this year, I learned that 20 percent of all of Danny Basavich's winnings are donated to charity. I think that speaks volumes about his character.

I began my journey on this current pool scene full of optimism, hope, and joy to be able to experience the sport in all its glory up front and center. Over the course of the years, I have lost a little enthusiasm, I must admit, having witnessed the infighting among various pool entities and watching pertinent industry members creating division and beating each other up. If the game, sport, whatever you want to call it, is ever going to advance and attract new interest, it will be because of players like Danny "Kid Delicious" Basavich, and I am proud to call him my friend. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

RailbirdJAM

Wally_in_Cincy
10-01-2004, 06:51 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote RailbirdJAM:</font><hr>

...A sponsor recognized a specialness in Danny, his charismatic personality as well as his strength in pool, and fortunately, it has provided some opportunities for him to excel in the sport..... <hr /></blockquote>

Howdy Ma'am,

who is his sponsor?

Steve Lipsky
10-01-2004, 07:17 AM
Hey Chris,

I do not want to invade Danny's privacy more than we already have, so the last thing I will say about it is that, yes, the weight is a big issue for him. If you get a chance, read the Mike Geffner article about him in Billiards Digest from a few months back.

I also don't see how the reporter would make up the story about rubbing beer on his face, but I guess you never know... (And nobody ever said it would be a good hustle, lol.) Danny has grown up a lot in the last 3 or 4 years, I think.

I hope my last post didn't give off a wrong impression of Danny. He makes me laugh, he's never been anything but a stand-up guy to me, and he's got the single greatest voice this side of the Mississippi (now that Ervolino moved to Vegas). If anyone took my post to be negative towards him in any way, that was not how I intended it to come off. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Sorry,
Steve

Popcorn
10-01-2004, 07:28 AM
That was my entire point, this bunch of bull was fed to the writer and that's what he wrote. Danny Basivich gave the writer a bunch of ammunition to write just one more BS story about pool. So what did it hurt? Well lets use out imagination. This story could be the last thing a city commissioner read at breakfast just before going to work. The first thing on the agenda is a person trying to get a parking variance to open a pool room. This commissioner turns out to be the deciding vote. He says to himself, "Maybe it is not such a good idea to have a business like this right in the middle of out town, just a few blocks from our high school." and votes it down.

Is my scenario far fetched, not at all. It happens every day. I spent two hours in front of a city commission trying to get a zoning change, (nothing to do with pool) and these people can be easily swayed by almost anything. In my town you can not get a license to open a small grocery store, (7-11 type) at all. A few years ago there was a bust of a small chain of these groceries that were money laundering and fronts for other stuff. That one incident was all it took. The city decided these places were nothing but somewhere to buy late night beer and cigarettes and the city could do without them, that was it. The image of pool hurts us in many ways. For the most part perception is reality and that is what you have here.

In this case I would say you have a story that isn't even for the most part true, as you pointed out. I hate to keep repeating myself but you just don't need stories like this being printed in the newspaper. I could write this same story and spin it to sound like pool was this kids salvation and the greatest game in the world. Challenging, interesting, a game that any parent would be proud to have their kids play. Not a story about a pathetic guy pouring beer on himself and pretending to be drunk to steal money. Want to talk about gambling, fine, but do it in a more classy way. People like to hear of the gunfighter who risk all against the top players, that has a mystic about it and is what the public finds exciting about the game, not this gutter stuff.

You just can't let these writers manipulate you. I did an interview some years back for an article in the local business section of the paper about the boom in pool. This was about a year after the Color of Money came out and pool rooms were opening every where. I talked to the guy for more then an hour and he constantly was asking about gambling and all as I was trying to talk about the business. When it came out the following week, there was a picture on the cover of a bunch of guys playing pool in a bar. You could see all the smoke and beer bottles and they looked like bikers. It was the main feature article in that issue. There was one small quote from me and that was it. The rest was all the BS that was fed to the guy by all the other room owners trying to make themselves cool. The writer really stabbed one guy in the back, calling his place a dark ominous looking room filed with a group of characters, (And he used their nick names they had given him) that could have come from central casting. This is a nice place, not in the best part of town, but real nice and clean. After reading this article you would never go in that place if you didn't know better. The hell with it, I have said enough. Some will get what I am talking about and most never will.

Dagwood
10-01-2004, 08:05 AM
Popcorn,

I understand what it is you're driving at. But I just don't agree with much of it. I know that zoning commissions are very touchy when it comes to giving out variances...my own family has had dealings with the board in my own hometown. But IMHO, we have to attract the public to the sport. People have a very morbid sense of what is interesting. Stories like what was printed about Danny are just what people want to read about. Like I said above, the more people get interested, the more money comes into the sport, and slowly but surely, public opinion, via their own experiences vice what we are telling them, will change towards pool. It's not something that will take place overnight, if it happens at all. Again...it's just my opinion.

Dags

#### leonard
10-01-2004, 08:18 AM
Popcorn, It was in the 60s Peter Balner[Palmer Cues] had the American Billiard Review and I wrote an article trying to get the poolplayers to copy the Pro-Golfers and run the tournaments for charity. Move pool into the Country Club set. I wrote no one in the poolroom busines can help pool but in the CC there are presidents of Corps with millions to spend in advertising.

Not one pro ever responded to that article, after that I knew I loved a game that had no future. In the 45 years since then Golfers had their purses go from a couple of hundred thousands to millions with some first prizes going to nearly a million.

When I played Irving Crane at the CC, they out drew the 4 Balsis/Crane matches that I had at the Albany Golden Cue in one night. The same people wouldn't be caught dead in a poolroom.####

Eric.
10-01-2004, 08:27 AM
####,

It's a shame that nobody took your lead. IMO, you have to tap the centers of influence and "pitch where the moneys at" to get more mainstream exposure.


Eric

Barbara
10-01-2004, 08:30 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr>You just can't let these writers manipulate you. I did an interview some years back for an article in the local business section of the paper about the boom in pool. This was about a year after the Color of Money came out and pool rooms were opening every where. I talked to the guy for more then an hour and he constantly was asking about gambling and all as I was trying to talk about the business. When it came out the following week, there was a picture on the cover of a bunch of guys playing pool in a bar. You could see all the smoke and beer bottles and they looked like bikers. It was the main feature article in that issue. There was one small quote from me and that was it. The rest was all the BS that was fed to the guy by all the other room owners trying to make themselves cool. The writer really stabbed one guy in the back, calling his place a dark ominous looking room filed with a group of characters, (And he used their nick names they had given him) that could have come from central casting. This is a nice place, not in the best part of town, but real nice and clean. After reading this article you would never go in that place if you didn't know better. The hell with it, I have said enough. Some will get what I am talking about and most never will. <hr /></blockquote>

Popcorn,

You've proved the point that some writers will write what they want to regardless of what you've said to them and how you answered their questions. And after it's been published, what the heck can you do about it?

I think this guy wrote what he wanted to without thinking about what this image does to pool. What does he care? He got his article.

Barbara

RailbirdJAM
10-01-2004, 08:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>Howdy Ma'am. Who is his sponsor? <hr /></blockquote>

Pittsburgh Steel. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

RailbirdJAM

Chris Cass
10-01-2004, 09:13 AM
Now I'm really confused. I never for once looked at your post as negative in the least. Heck Steve, Your one of the most giving and positive persons I've ever known.

Regards,

C.C.~~never got that impression and I'll have to take Danny as how he is today. everyone changes and I guess he's no different than anyone else. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Deeman2
10-01-2004, 09:17 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote RailbirdJAM:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>Howdy Ma'am. Who is his sponsor? <hr /></blockquote>

Pittsburgh Steel. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

RailbirdJAM <hr /></blockquote>

Now that is nice. It's good to see someone outside the pool industry sponsor someone like Danny. Maybe, if he does well, some others will get good sponsorship.

Deeman

Nostroke
10-01-2004, 10:50 AM
No matter what any curmudgeon may say about an article, it is clear that everyone who has met Danny, knows he is AOK.

I have met probably 50% of all the regular playing pros at one time or another and Danny and Tony R are the only ones i can 100% count on to get a greeting from. Danny will always give me the big smile, shake my hand and start with some small talk. Im not going to repeat what everyone else has said but those that have met him are right on.

And Steve you are so right. That half Brooklkyn half Jersey accent with his voice quality puts him clearly at the top of the category. You cant help but smile when he is talking to you with that voice and smile. I have never seen an ounce of depression in him and he always lifts the spirits of those around him. KD is one of a kind!

RichardCranium
10-01-2004, 11:42 AM
Kid Delicious...........what an awesome nick name...I am totally Jelous...........

I heard there was a guy back East that was called "Pudding"...I can see the headline now if they match up...."Kid Delicious eats Pudding for lunch"

Wally_in_Cincy
10-01-2004, 12:17 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote RichardCranium:</font><hr> ...."Kid Delicious eats Pudding for lunch"
<hr /></blockquote>

LOL

Actually he prefers cheeseburgers /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

They said Wimpy Lassiter got his nickname because of the copious amounts of hamburgers he could put away.

Chris Cass
10-03-2004, 07:41 AM
Hi Popcorn,

I know what you mean about everything you've mentioned. Zoning or whatever to the local board of commisioners have to meet their standards. Something that will make them money or what they feel the town needs. Sure we don't need bad publicity surrounding the game more than we have already.

If it wasn't a big problem Byrnes wouldn't have put a special section in his book about it. I feel there's a few factors when trying to get a liceince to open a room. One has to be the room owner. He or she must present it the right way. It helps to have a good reputation in the community and invest some money that would show what type place their opening. Not some that just want to have some hole in the wall.

I think the location also matters a lot too. You wouldn't want to have it in a secluded part of town. They also might think of past experience with pool halls that didn't work well for some reason or another. Beyond me that they would give some dirty book store a licience without a thought over a pool hall. Now, that's some degenerates there.

I'm not the person to talk to about liciences anyway. I've never had the opportunity to try for one or open a business. It's all that I'm thinking about that would cause problems getting one.

About the writers and interviewing. I tend to sway with Barbara on this one. Seems the writer asked Danny many things and most likely took bits and pieces of what he said then, took what he thought would make a good article and took it from there.

Writing is so subjective. Somewhat like the news. Say CNN vs NSNBC. I if I were Danny would have that writer retract some things but he very well couldn't if he told him the things he wrote in part. He may have wanted the recognition as a pool player and seen this as his opportunity to see his name in print. Who knows?

Myself, I'd like, if it were me? To lean towards the human interest side of things. It's much more positive to others in every walk of life than just the billiard industry and it would help the game also. I've been down the seady side of the game and have done plenty things that I'm not proud of and some would find exciting. You pretty much have to pi$$ me off to hear anything from my past.

Instead, my story would be the one of how a small guy that's devoted his life to the game and his family. One man that had a 5% chance of surviving Cancer. Faced with this battle and thinking of his family only. Got them involved on a chat board.

Introduced them to his new found friends. Got them involved in the sport to help them deal with his passing. The board with it's members throughout the entire U.S., Canada and throught the entire world. Came togather and fought this battle with him all the way.

One memeber getting his church involved. Another, one of it's memebers with the biggest named cuemaker in the billiard community. Gave his own personal cue as a gift from the board to help in his recovery.

All members with phone calls, cards signed from players throught the country including many professional players on ESPN. All there to fight this dreaded Cancer. All in his corner right there with this helpless family in time of need. All pulling togather as one. One of their own.

Togather, we beat this Cancer, with only the 5% chance of winning. People that love the sport and willing to spend countless time and money helping one another for a common reason. For the love of another human being that all share the love of the game togather.

After, this battle was won it didn't stop there. It's on to the next and this pool player surprised over how all the prayers and fight togather would come out winning. With one thought in mind. Paying it forward.

To me this, is what pool players are all about. We're about competition and when push comes to shove we're all in it togather as family. The sport we love and the poeple that we share the love of the game with. It's not about the back room anymore. It's much bigger than that.

See Popcorn, that's why I know what you mean. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif It's not all about someone. It's about all of us.

Regards,

C.C.~~BD has no clue but IP does. /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

Popcorn
10-03-2004, 11:16 AM
Now there is a stoty worth telling.