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View Full Version : Shooting in a non-wheelchair match from a wheelchair?



bluewolf
09-29-2004, 08:00 AM
<font color="brown">This is a variation from the APA ruling thread relating to wheelchair patients. Not wanting to add to the thread since the answers appeared to be given in that thread, I also had another question about persons shooting from a wheelchair relating to some of my obsevations.

I know people that are disabled to the point that they must shoot from the wheelchair the entire match, but also know some that could stand for some shots. In their case, they do have some use of their legs, but just could not stand or walk around the table in a match; as opposed to total paralysis of the legs.

I think that when we see someone in a wheelchair, many of us think that they have no use of their legs, when this is not always the case.

But, the ones I have watched In APA matches are the ones that are TOTALLY wheelchair bound. In observing many of them shoot, their equipment put them at a very low seating position,and often made them do a [censored] out stroke, were not able to reach many shots without the bridge,but were also at a disadvantage, compared to a standing player, in their use of the bridge.

I wondered if there is some kind of specialized wheelchair equipment, which would elevate them enough to get a better reach and/or stroke on the ball.

Any persons who use wheelchairs, or have medical experience working with wheelchair persons, know of any 'adaptive' equipment, that would enable those in wheelchairs, playing in a non-wheelchair event, have less of a disadvantage?

Laura</font color>

Billy_Bob
09-29-2004, 11:44 AM
I have heard of one person who sits on a cushion to elevate him a bit.

I played another guy in a wheelchair who had just stumps for legs. He would sit up in his chair for the break or for some shots. He is quite a good player. He also respected me and looked happy when I beat him. I think he wants to be treated like anyone else and not given any breaks in the game, etc. He did get even and beat me in the second round.

Personally; how anyone in a wheelchair plays or how they manage to hit the balls - with a stick extension, mechanical bridge, sometimes sitting, sometimes standing, cushion, or whatever - would not bother me.

I would say do whatever works for you, have special devices made which help you shoot if needed, sometimes stand, sometimes sit, whatever. So long as you are following the basic rules of the game, I would not have any problem with your playing. (Until you beat me of course! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif)

Popcorn
09-29-2004, 11:57 AM
QUOTE

"I would say do whatever works for you, have special devices made which help you shoot if needed, sometimes stand, sometimes sit, whatever. So long as you are following the basic rules of the game, I would not have any problem with your playing. (Until you beat me of course! )"

If you are playing in a wheelchair tournament though, you have to stay in the chair. There used to be a guy, I think his name was Hill that had no legs and would pull himself up on the rail, sometimes sitting in the middle of the table to shoot, it was ridicules.

Wally_in_Cincy
09-29-2004, 12:20 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluewolf:</font><hr>
....I wondered if there is some kind of specialized wheelchair equipment, which would elevate them enough to get a better reach and/or stroke on the ball....<hr /></blockquote>

I imagine some sort of hydraulic mechanism of that type would be quite expensive (about the same amount as some players spend for a cue /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif ), but it probably exists.

Popcorn
09-29-2004, 12:45 PM
Wheel chair pool is well organized and they use all kinds of things to make the game easier for them to play. I have a friend that is a very good player. I have modified his chair and made extensions for him. He has a chair with no arms and a higher seat. I also made a holder for his special bridge and longer cue. The big problem is the type of handicap the player has. Some are not very stable and want to fall over when they lean. You have to make a strapping system so they can lean comfortably and not fall out of the chair. If I sit in a wheelchair there is little difference in my play as long as I can reach the shot because I can use my leg strength to steady myself. They have more problems then just being in a chair.

http://www.nwpainc.com/

bluewolf
09-29-2004, 04:36 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr>The big problem is the type of handicap the player has. Some are not very stable and want to fall over when they lean. You have to make a strapping system so they can lean comfortably and not fall out of the chair. If I sit in a wheelchair there is little difference in my play as long as I can reach the shot because I can use my leg strength to steady myself. They have more problems then just being in a chair.

<hr /></blockquote>

Sounds like you have done some good things, Popcorn. You are right about the balance thing though, if the legs cannot stabilize you. In fact, there are some people, who are in wheelchairs more for balance reasons than leg problems.

That actually, is where I was a few months ago,in the wheelchair before I went back into remission before league started up again, but I did lose my balance last night and do a cueball foul.LOL But i did then really start wondering about modifications to make shooting from a wheelchair easier.

Laura

heater451
02-29-2012, 10:26 PM
I know this thread is from 2004, but I happened across it, and wanted to add something, in case someone happens to be web-searching the issue.

I've seen a guy shoot from a wheelchair with a custom cue--it might have been 3 sections. It was extra long, maybe even over 60", and he shot using an underhand stroke. The reason I am mentioning this, is because I think an extended cue might still be necessary, when using a "standing wheelchair".

This company has manual and power standing 'chairs: The Standing Company (http://www.thestandingcompany.com/)

And Levo has one that, like FWD power chairs, kind of blurs the line between 'power chair' and 'scooter' (like the Jazzy does, which you may have seen on TV): Levo USA (http://www.levousa.com/)

I used to do service on Durable Medical Equipment (DME). We used to get shown these kind of things all the time. . . .

Tampa Kathy
04-08-2012, 01:09 AM
I've known several wheelchair players. A couple of them had modified chairs with the arms cut lower than most standard wheelchairs. One used a standard wheelchair. I think it depended on what the individual could adjust to. I know that one of them used something like a belt for security.

Deeman3
04-09-2012, 01:52 PM
I really admire those who play so well despite their handicap.

bradb
04-09-2012, 04:00 PM
Dee, the best player in the BC 8-ball league is in a wheel chair.

I've had to play him several times and each time he ran out on me. There is no handicap for him, he can shoot from any angle. I have heard that he has gone down to Vegas when his team wins so I believe he is an eligible player. Brad