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drawshot
10-06-2004, 10:09 AM
Every time I get a ding into my cue I have used some burnishing papers to remove the ding... unfortunately this has cause the ferulle to be a little larger than the shaft and I feel a little ridge from the slightly larger ferulle.

So I ask what is the best way to thin the ferulle every so slightly?

Sid_Vicious
10-06-2004, 11:18 AM
I quit taking the entire shaft down in order to remove dings long ago. Your problem imo is not in the ferrule result but in the methodology of ding removal. I do have one ferrule like this though, became that way when a cue maker turned the shaft attempting to remove the chalk color. I'll never make that mistake again either...sid~~~uses a syringe and water drops to remove dents

Btw, I'd leave the ferrule as it is and not worry about it

Troy
10-06-2004, 12:09 PM
First, I can only imagine you feel the difference between the shaft and the ferrule 'cuz you know it's there... Certainly not when you're actually shooting... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
If you must fix it, simply rub down the ferrule 'til it's the same diameter as the shaft.
Or, as Sid said, "leave the ferrule as it is and not worry about it".

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote drawshot:</font><hr> Every time I get a ding into my cue I have used some burnishing papers to remove the ding... unfortunately this has cause the ferulle to be a little larger than the shaft and I feel a little ridge from the slightly larger ferulle.

So I ask what is the best way to thin the ferulle every so slightly? <hr /></blockquote>

Chris Cass
10-06-2004, 12:25 PM
Hi Drawshot,

Well, I think you should try first to swell the wood before the ferrule. Just wet it, not too much but get it close as you can and sand it lightly with some 1000 grit or 800 grit. If you see or feel that lil difference then I suggest you have a leathe man get it right. One pass should do it.

Just be lucky you don't have Ivory. That comes down very easy and it's usually the other way around. This also happens due to the weather change too sometimes. Also, when the shaft gets too old. I've seen also happen to shafts that the ferrule has swelled a bit. Now, if you see some space between the ferrule and the shaft? Then of course you'll need to replace the ferrule. In that case some leathe guys can replace it but you'll be stuck with a smaller ferrule than the shaft as it's time consuming to get it perfect.

I'd try to first swell the wood surrounding your ferrule. Just be carefull and wipe it off quickly because it can cause a say, Meucci ferrule to blow right off the shaft when the water gets under it. It's really cool to see but it's not cool if it's yours. LOL

Regards,

C.C.~~doesn't mess with the shaft unless it's totally neccessary.

BLACKHEART
10-06-2004, 03:19 PM
Unfortuately, your ferrule is more than likely, a plastic tube. If you cut or sand the ferrule down to the size of the thinned shaft, you will have a thin walled ferrule, that will be prone to splitting. Leave it alone...JER

drawshot
10-06-2004, 04:40 PM
It's fiber linen... was considering sanding it but will fiber linen weaken with sanding it... were taking not even a millimeter.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BLACKHEART:</font><hr> Unfortuately, your ferrule is more than likely, a plastic tube. If you cut or sand the ferrule down to the size of the thinned shaft, you will have a thin walled ferrule, that will be prone to splitting. Leave it alone...JER <hr /></blockquote>

BLACKHEART
10-06-2004, 05:00 PM
If it's just a little bit, then sand it down &amp; enjoy...BUT when sanding,remember that the wood next to the ferrule will sand easier than the ferrule &amp; you will only make it worse. Make sure you ONLY sand the ferrule or you'll be buying a new shaft. JMO...JER

ppgr
10-09-2004, 09:41 PM
If you decide to sand down the ferrule, be sure you use a sanding block.Otherwise you're likely to make it worse.