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A_Reyes
10-14-2004, 07:53 PM
Does anyone know how to level a 9ft. three piece Peter Vitalie table. My table is off a little at the foot of it. There are no shims in it. I tried to get the people that set it up to come to where I live because I noticed the seam come up on on of the slates.(one month later)

At the time I was considering letting them replace the rubber and felt for me as well, but I did not get a return call from them the second time I called them. I had someone come in and replace the bumpers and cloth and before I thought of asking them about leveling the table, they were about done with their work.

It isn't off real bad, but when you get to that end of the table it can be somewhat aggravating /ccboard/images/graemlins/mad.gif

I don't want to spend another small fortune on someone else doing it if I can do it. Just for infomration the second business that came and replaced the bumpers and cloth used beeswax to seal the slate joints. They said the person who installed it used drywall compound and they shouldn't of.

Now I have two different businesss that contradict each other. Does anyone know who is right? I especially don't want the same people doing the work. Neither of them have impressed me with their knowledge. The old saying; if you want it done right, do it yourself, is coming to mind!

I would appreciate any ideas or suggestions

Angel /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

JimS
10-15-2004, 04:59 AM
It's tricky trying this on your own. If you try to lift the table it's quite likely you'll pop the slate and leveling the table also takes a machinists level and they are expensive...even used on eBay.

Some seal the slates with beeswax, some with Bondo. I haven't heard of sealing with drywall compound.

I'll bet you'll get more knowledgeable answers than mine as I'm not an experienced table mechanic.

SnakebyteXX
10-15-2004, 06:35 AM
[ QUOTE ]
Just for infomration the second business that came and replaced the bumpers and cloth used beeswax to seal the slate joints. They said the person who installed it used drywall compound and they shouldn't of.
<hr /></blockquote>

I'm a little confused by your post. Are you saying that one month after you bought the table and had it set up the slate separated? That the people who did the original setup used dry wall compound to seal the slate joints and when that failed they wouldn't fix the problem?
Further:
[ QUOTE ]
the second business that came and replaced the bumpers and cloth used beeswax to seal the slate joints. They said the person who installed it used drywall compound and they shouldn't of.
<hr /></blockquote>

First things first: For sealing the seams between pool table slates, Drywall compound = BAD -- Beeswax = GOOD.

Are you saying that the second business you called repaired the separated slate problem (using beeswax) but didn't level the table at the same time? That seems very odd. Seems to me that repairing separated (uneven) slates would certainly require some effort be spent at restoring them to true level.

It's possible that they leveled the table at that time and you have a problem with the floor sagging beneath your table. If that's not the case and real truth is that the table is still out of whack because of the slates separating and was not re-leveled properly by the last crew that came out - then they should be called upon to return and do the job right - no extra charge.

OTOH: Maybe it's time to forget about the first two incompetent businesses and call in business number three?

Snake

table_tech
10-15-2004, 07:12 AM
yes u need to find another mechanic.your table needs to be releveled,it might be a quick easy fix or it could be a costly one too.if u called me and i knew i was following two other companies and u told me the the details i would suggest removing the rails,the bed cloth,re level the frame first,then the slate,fill the seems with beeswax then reassemble the table and of course stand behind the work i do.dealers here use wax and plaster.ive only used beeswax but ive done many recloths and lots of dealers still use plaster or whatever it is.

Troy
10-15-2004, 07:38 AM
A competent Table Mechanic would assure the table was correct. This should include leveling the frame and then the slates, using a Machinist Level (12").

The two best mechanics on the West Coast use Bondo® on the slate seams and on any other slate imperfections. "Drywall compound" ??, I seriously doubt even a hack would use it.

Troy

Deeman2
10-15-2004, 08:07 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote A_Reyes:</font><hr> Does anyone know how to level a 9ft. three piece Peter Vitalie table. My table is off a little at the foot of it. There are no shims in it. I tried to get the people that set it up to come to where I live because I noticed the seam come up on on of the slates.(one month later)

At the time I was considering letting them replace the rubber and felt for me as well, but I did not get a return call from them the second time I called them. I had someone come in and replace the bumpers and cloth and before I thought of asking them about leveling the table, they were about done with their work.

It isn't off real bad, but when you get to that end of the table it can be somewhat aggravating /ccboard/images/graemlins/mad.gif

I don't want to spend another small fortune on someone else doing it if I can do it. Just for infomration the second business that came and replaced the bumpers and cloth used beeswax to seal the slate joints. They said the person who installed it used drywall compound and they shouldn't of.

Now I have two different businesss that contradict each other. Does anyone know who is right? I especially don't want the same people doing the work. Neither of them have impressed me with their knowledge. The old saying; if you want it done right, do it yourself, is coming to mind!

I would appreciate any ideas or suggestions

Angel /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif <hr /></blockquote>

A.Reyes:

I think, by your description, you don't have the basic skills, knowledge and tools to do this yourself as others have said. If you table is off, on one end, the three slates are not in a common plane. I suspect, as it happened in a month, that the slate was not laying flat in the first place or was not resting flat on the cross supports. The entire key will be to get these three in plane and secure before attempting to level the slate, as a whole with the floor/gravity/earth. Hire a good table mechanic. Then he/she can fill the gaps between the slates and check them with a precision straight edge or spirit level when they are in line. If the mechanic does not have a precision level a machine shop or tool and die shop might loan you one to have on hand while he/she is working. You did not, I assume, have to replace the cushions and cloth after one month of play so this must be a used table.

What you can do, while the mechanic is working is to make sure the three slates are solid and none "rock' when in place. Have him show you how the three slates are in plane before installing the cloth. Check out the "entire" table surface with the level when he is finished. Set up balls along the rails in line and equally spaced from the rail and tap them with a third ball to see that they roll straight down the rail. Do this on all rails, all sides. Drop a few balls off the nose of the cushion and watch them roll to a stop, paying attention to the last couple of inches of roll. Do this in several places on all three slate areas.

Some other notes. Shims are o.k. but they should be solid under the slates. Surface area is important in this as a narrow shim that only contacts a small surface area will distort/compress in time. Don't refer to cushions as bumpers and cloth as felt or they will know you don't know what you are talking about.

I know you feel that you may have to do it yourself if you want a good job, as you said, but don't try this without some professional help. You don't want a plumber doing heart surgery on you. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

NBC-BOB
10-15-2004, 10:22 AM
It sounds like your table was never properly leveled to start with, or it settled on the type of flooring that you have.I would start by removing the rails,cloth,slates and leveling the base properly.I've used joint compound, and never had a problem,but beeswax is fine.If the slates are shimmed properly you should be able to take a ball in your hand and slide it across the seams without feeling anything.
If you do the seams of the slate are not properly shimmed.

trailboss
10-16-2004, 06:01 AM
Bondo or beeswax are the only two I have heard of for the seams. If its beeswax and a seam pops up it is easy to fix.. you get a cueball and roll it firmly across the seam, do not roll it with the seam just back and fourth across it. This should take care of the problem.

Angel_R
10-25-2004, 09:07 PM
Thanks Everyone for your perspectives. Sorry I took so long to reply, I couldn't log on and had to change my name and email account. I just had the guys back in and they looked at my table. The levels all say i am right on. They did some tweaking, but it appears my slate may be slightly warped. Oh well. It still shoots real good. Maybe next year I'll buy new slate. Thanks anyways for all the input. Angel /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

ras314
10-26-2004, 08:05 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Angel_R:</font><hr> I just had the guys back in and they looked at my table. The levels all say i am right on. They did some tweaking, but it appears my slate may be slightly warped. <hr /></blockquote>
Sounds like they used carpenters levels. If so these are not sensitive enough. A machinist level which is usually used has marks which indicate about a .005" per ft slope. It is next to impossible to have one of these read "right on" at all spots on the table. If off no more than 1/2 division a slow rolling ball will roll quite straight unless there is a problem with the cloth.

Angel_R
10-26-2004, 08:27 PM
I'm not sure what kind they used, but one was about 6-7 ft long and the other at least 4ft. Angel /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

table_tech
10-26-2004, 09:13 PM
if you paid full price for the work they did you were robbed,id bet your slate is ok.a qualified installer/mechanic doesnt have to use a machinist's level to level a table ,but they would never use a 4' 6' or bigger level,this is a fact.do yourself a favor and next time try another company.

Chris Cass
10-27-2004, 04:22 AM
Hi Angel,

All the table mechanics out by me which is 2. Use only a machinist level. They both are 1ft long. Seems to me if you really have a warped piece of slate you'd might look into replacing that section with another.

I know on Jamie Baraks home 10ft table he found a slate piece off another table and drilled the holes for the replacement and it worked out fine as I've heard from the ones who played on it. The slate isn't cheap but he found one piece that was off a table someone was getting rid of and it was straight. So, it wouldn't hurt to ask around and when one arises, buy it. just the one piece should surfice.

Also, I thought bando was used for the small dings and not the seems? I also think there should have been cards to seperate the slate pieces when putting the slates togather? Also some liquid nails or something that Barry Berhrman uses for the Open when they set them up? JimS knows, he has his set up the right way and it also had problems in the beginning.

He's the best to talk to about what he went through. His popped up too and it was fixed. His plays straighter than any table I ever played on. What a table. The tables also do settle in too. I know this and once the frame and bed are set up you'll have to recheck after about a week. A room owner told me that.

Regards,

C.C.~~not a table mechanic.

Angel_R
10-29-2004, 07:58 PM
Thanks!